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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im looking at a German k98 mauser and I am wondering what questions I should ask the seller before buying, and anything I should look for or watch out for. And how can I make sure I get the best one out of the 3 that he has? thnx

heres the ad description:
I have for sale only 3 left = K-98 8MM. Germar Mauser at $ 159.00 Ea. Gun have very good Bore 80% or better and good wood, all have been test fired and checked out.About 80% blueing or less on guns, no rust or pitting on the guns.Gun are captured K-98s with most of the markings removed but there some German marking remaining on guns in some places.Guns were made in the Preduzece factory about 1944 all machined parts.Some guns have #s match on bolt and rec. Guns are not [M48s] note the short handgard on top and the bolt disassembly disc. in the stock..Shipping is $ 11.00 To FFL. or CRL. Dealers

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Nice guns - I'd probably go with the lower one, but that's just personal preference. The Yugo rearsenals are good rifles, with some war history. The price isn't bad, especially compared to the recent Russian-captures on the market.
Ideally, you'd want to have a gunsmith check them over for headspacing and general condition. Check the front sights, if it's offset to one side, it could indicate an accuracy problem. A few WaffenAmts here and there don't really add much value IMHO, since the best markings have been scrubbed.
Looks like a fair deal. :cool:
 

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I agree with Big Dog they all appear to nice rifles I would also go with the bottom one from what I see in the picture. Price is within the range based on condition.

If you are looking at a specific type (laminate or walnut) or a specific grade, you might want to check CDNN www.cdnninvestments.com, they usually have some pretty good Yugo rearsenal rifles with good pricing based on what you want.
You will have to download the PDF file catalog to view what they have.

Either way they are good rifles, as mentioned have a gunsmith check the headspace or get yourself some gauges and do it yourself.
 

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First, don't assume that what you are told is true (sorta like a mechanic telling you you need brakes when your rotors need turning).

Have the guns looked at by a reputable smith for head space, cracks in the bolt lugs, cracks in the receiver, etc.

Check the stock to make sure there are no cracks in the area of the barrel locking screw/lug. Some Ks have the normal wear and tear cracks and dings and you have to decide if they are acceptable to you, or not.

Safety is the thing with old milsurp guns. What looks good could well kill you.

I've seen guns with a chitty bore that shot better than one with a clean and pristene bore.

For the most part any you get is going to be one heck of a shooter......but, there are exceptions. If the lands and grooves appear to be square on the edges.....cool.

Check for play in the bolt action when it's locked. Not up and down so much, but forward and backward.

With the bolt open, press the trigger and push the bolt forward and engage (push forward) the bolt it to make sure the release/trigger works. IF you have an old spent cartridge, cover the primer with two or three layers of cellophane tape and 'dry fire' the gun to make sure the firing pin makes a good indentation.

These are the basics and many have covered other good area.

Everything discussed here can be checked by any reputable gunsmith. It might cost you $20-30 but that is better than something awful happening to your forehead, eyes, etc. You see, the fun part of shooting is being able to do it again another day.

Good luck with your selection and keep us posted...they're a dang good gun....yepper....fer sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanx a lot for all the info guys, but I dont know a **** thing about k98's except that they are bolt action rifles used by the German army in WWII. Never shot one... Dont own any other guns so this 98 would be my first, but I'm really interested in getting one. Bolt...reciever... pins... springs...:rolleyes: I wouldnt even be able to identify all these parts, let alone inspect them.:confused: I found this ad online and it just so happens that this guy with the 98's lives only a couple hours away from me, so would it be better to drive up there and see the guns in person? or just pay the shipping and have it sent?

Do you think there would be any chance that I could take the gun to a 'smith, then if he finds something wrong with it, return it to the owner? kinda like you do with a car before you buy it:)

thnx
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I posted the same message in another gun forum, and one guy said this:
From what I can tell the top two are the ones to chose from( the bottom one's but plate and reciver ring is different from any of the true gerw 98ks I've seen) hopefully one of them has the matching # becase I would go with it if possible and matching # makes it worth a little more to the collector. Most captured weapons were collected from the soldiers and the bolts removed and placed in a different location to keep them from being useful if recaptured, so thats why its hard to find ones with the # matching. I hope that helps you a little with out actualy haveing hands on to make a choice.
He likes the top two, while you guys say the bottom one... Why would you get the bottom one over the top two?
 

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Kreator,

Without seeing the guns firsthand I would say the top two are German K98s indicative of the flush butt plate and the bottom one is a Yugo K98 (big brother of the Yugo 48 and 48A) indicative of the wrap around butt plate.

If it's close enough to drive that might be a consideration. For about $20 each, you can buy a 'Go' and 'No go" chamber gauges with which to check the gun yourself when you get there.

Essentially what these do is 'measure' the accuracy and wear (or lack of wear) between the the space where the bolt meets the rear of the round and the chamber walls and seat when the cartridge is seated. Too much wear and the gun may be dangerous to shoot.

For example, if you put an 8MM 'Go gauge' in the chamber and the bolt closes that tells you that chamber will accept the 8MM round. However, that doesn't necessarily mean the gun is safe....therefore, if you put a "No go' gauge in it and it still closes it means the chamber is too worn for safe shooting. The bolt should not close when you put a 'No go' in it.

Depending on who you talk to, one GENERAL rule of thumb is if you put an 8MM round in the chamber and the bolt extractor engauges and pulls the round out you don't need to check it with a 'go gauge' but just a 'no go gauge'.

Some will tell you, and I admit I've done it, you can take the gun out in the boondocks.....load it up, place some blankets, etc over it, weigh it down and pull the trigger with a string while you're around side of you vehicle.

If the gun is still intact afterwards ALL this tells you is after THAT shot it's still all together. It doesn't tell you if you were lucky or if it might go 'boom' in your face the next time. So, I DON'T recommend or subscribe to that method of testing.

The gauges can be purchased from various websites and are a good investment, especially if you plan on buying other 8MM surplus rifles.

After I post this I will research for the websites where you can buy the gauges, if you wish. Keep in mind the delivery time and the amount of time you might have left to purchase the guns.

If you have some local gun shops there might be one where you can buy the guages locally.

If the buyer insists he/she has had the guns gauged have him sign saying that and let your conscience be your guide. Have which ever you buy rechecked though. If they don't check out you might have some leverage making him take the gun back for another one.

Unfortunately, there are few people out there that will warranty their guns and most people sell on the pretense the buyer is supposed to know what they are shopping for and they buy 'as is'.

Incidentally, for about what he is asking for those guns you can buy an unissued Yugo M48 or M48A, and from firsthand experience, those are two super guns in their own rights.

But, for collectors, the German Ks are the ones to get...ones with the Nazi markings still intact, that is....otherwise the Germans with ground off markings are not that collectable.

Check out www.brownells.com for the gauges and type in 'go gauge' in the search field.

I hope this is of some help to you and I haven't 'cornfused' you. If not, let me know and I will try and muddy the waters even more for you, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am a big WWII fan and I really would like a German one, and dont care if its a capture, just as long as its originaly German and in good shooting condition.

How can I make sure I get the best one he has?
What size round does it take?

Ok, Im going to try and call this guy tonight and ask him some questions:
-Are they in good shooting condition?
-Have you tested them? (and how you tested them)
-What #'s match?
-What markings are left on them?
-What comes with it? (case, sling, bayonnet,etc.)

Anything else I should ask him?
 

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from the pictures all 3 of these guns are k98k german mausers. the buttplate and barrel bands changed over time. the top 2 have the flat milled buttplate, and earlier style barrel bands. the bottom has the late war stamped steel cupped buttplate. these rifles should all take the 8x57mm german round, commonly called 8mm mauser. the best bet in getting the best one is to actually look at them in person.
 

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Kreator,

No offense, but I spent, dang, I dunno, close to an hour answering you and giving you a website and it still went over yer head.

The bottom line is YOU DON'T KNOW which is best without having fired it...having it checked out, etc. all of which was recommended.....grrrrrrrrrr.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, I really do appriciate all the info you gave me and you have helped a lot. I dont think I asked the same question twice, and if I did, I didnt mean to. But like I said, I am a "newbie" when it comes to this stuff, and this is all new to me so I have to ask a lot of questions. I'm just a little paranoid about getting ripped off... didnt mean to get on ur nerves... but its getting late and people get cranky... bedtime;)

K, i'm calling this guy tomorrow, and if anyone can think of any more questions I should ask him, let me know.

thnx again
 

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If all goes as I expect it too, you're gonna get one heck of a fine weapon.

If you use older corrosive ammo I suggest you clean your gun right after firing and not let it set.

When I go to the range I take along a bottle of ammonia/water solution (1 part ammonia to three parts of water) and run a damp swab down the barrel several times and on the bolt right after I shoot. Then I do a more thorough job when I get home.

That corrosive ammo can pit, corrode and rust your gun parts if the salts sit too long.

Some people also suggest a good scrubbing of the exposed parts with Hoppes 9 too. Most sources say ammonia solution and hot water works well.

Anyway, have fun...yepper....fer sure.

BTW, are you getting all three or just one particular gun? And, how do the serial numbers match up?
 

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Kreator,

Since you live so close I would recommend going to see it in person, if you have someone more familiar with these types of firearms see if they can go with you. If not most sellers will offer a 3 day non firing inspection period, this should give you enough time to have the weapon looked over by a reputable gunsmith.

As stated earlier all 3 are 98k rifles, the seller has indicated that all of them are Yugo captures and are identified by the "Preduzece" on the receiver ring. The earlier year rifles had a flat butt plate the later year had the cupped butt plate. Any of the 3 are fine based on the condition upon inspection. I believe Big Dog and I listed a personal preference but there is nothing wrong with the other two. I just like the overall stock appearance on the bottom one as well as the "H" type band, also I did not see Preduzece stamped on the receiver ring of the bottom rifle so it makes me wonder if it is a German 98.
 

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Yeah, what Stewart said . . .

Actually, from the pic all three look pretty good. I'd love to see all three in good sunlight, and be able to go over them well.
Is the seller a reputable dealer or a private individual? A dealer should honor a three day inspection period. If his ad is honest, you shouldn't be disappointed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Dale,
Im just getting 1 gun.
About the #'s he says "Some guns have #'s match on bolt and rec."

Big Dog,
Well, something tells me that hes a dealer...:)

:eek:

This is all the dealer said about the gun;
:confused:-Gun have very good Bore 80% or better and good wood
-all have been test fired and checked out
:confused:-About 80% blueing or less on guns
-no rust or pitting on the guns
-Gun are captured K-98s with most of the markings removed but there some German marking remaining on guns in some places
-Guns were made in the Preduzece factory about 1944 all machined parts
-Some guns have #s match on bolt and rec
:confused:-Guns are not [M48s] note the short handgard on top and the bolt disassembly disc. in the stock

The ones with the :confused: by it means I dont know what hes talking about
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Originally posted by Big Dog
Check the front sights, if it's offset to one side, it could indicate an accuracy problem.
What would I be looking for? Ive never seen the front sight up close... if its tilted to 1 side? or moved over? :confused:

thnx
 

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Dang, Kreator...you got me drooling over dem beauties....yepppppppppppeeeeerrrrr....fer sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well, it looks like I got the green light! I called him, hes a real nice guy, sounds sincere and honest, Im gonna try and go up in a couple weeks and pick one up. And Dale, save some of that drool cause hes got a vet bring-back with all matching #'s and all the nazi insignia still on it!:nod:

And another thing, he said he'll let me use his gauges if I wanna take a look at the headspacing myself. He also offered some free ammo and he said I can shoot before I buy :target:
 

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here's just some usefull info. these guns were not made in yugoslavia, they were produced at various german factories in germany and several other occupied countries. preduzece44 is simply the yugoslavian armory that checked out these guns and ground the the german production code and year off the top of the reciever ring, then they stamped the yugoslavian crest on them, so in fact you cannot verify which year these rifles were made in. and for that vet bring back rifle check under the barrel in front of the bayonett lug, that is where you will find an importers stamp if it wasnt a vet bring back. if it matters or if you can distinguish the difference milled parts on a rifle were generally made in or before 1942, stamped parts were usually 1942 or later- this is just a general guide as some factories produced milled parts almost to the end of the war, some others didn't.
 
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