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For years, critics of The New York Times have complained about the pervasive bias in the paper's news articles. Gun owners have seen countless stories that are factually incorrect or contain scare quotes from anti-gunners without any counter from the NRA. But this anti-gun bias seems to have grown into something that may be even worse: a pro-crime message.

Reporter David Dunlap was recently assaulted in midtown Manhattan by a man who was upset that the reporter was taking pictures of an illegal activity (signs being illegally posted on light poles). Dunlap was thrown to the ground and beaten, and his camera was smashed. But Dunlap says he won't press charges.

"I'm not inclined to press charges. While my assailant's actions were frightening, they resulted in part from what he interpreted as provocation: that is, my taking pictures after he had explicitly warned me not to. He did not take my wallet, cash or briefcase; something he could easily have done while I was on the ground. Nor do I recall him using much more force than was needed to wrest the camera from me. He didn't kick me gratuitously when I was down. He did what he threatened to do, but no more."

So if a rapist tells you he's going to rape you, doesn't use "much more force than was needed," doesn't rob you, and only does what he threatens to do, should he get off the hook?

Dunlap saves his anger for the company that presumably employed the attacker, Def Jam/Island Records. But most of the people commenting on this story are pleading with Dunlap to press charges. They understand that if this man faces no consequences for his assault, he'll likely feel free to commit another. Too bad Dunlap seems more concerned with seeing a corporation answer for the criminal action of an employee rather than seeing a criminal face justice for his assault on an innocent man.

I have a message for David Dunlap. You were the victim of a crime. But your refusal to prosecute your attacker may lead to other crimes being committed by the same man. And they may not all end with "just a bruise" and a broken camera. Getting tough on crime isn't just the job of politicians. We have our role to play as well if we want to see our streets become safer.

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If he can prove that the company ordered the attack he can prosecute both.
 

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Themes

I work at a university where the national edition of the New York Times is set out daily for all pick up at no cost. Therefore, I go though the Monday-Friday editions as the week progresses.

The paper more and more has themes to the news stories to make a point about what the owners want to say and this is further reinforced by the opinion/letters to the editor page.

For instance, Hillary seems never to lose. Her organization makes mistakes, the voters don't get the message, Obama's organization did really well, and so on . . . Yet the overall theme comes through that Hillary should have won but something or everything went wrong beyond her control. If Hillary does not get the nomination I expect it will be stories that the Democratic Party made mistakes, the superdelegates did not get the message, Obama's organization was primed to take over the convention, and so on . . . .

It is a far cry from the historical banner of "All the News thats Fit to Print".
 
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