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a good historical about Glock. Gaston used a lot of contacts.
My opinion. Modern Firearm History Lesson


The task fell to Lieutenant Ingo Wieser, an aide to Colonel Dechant, to compare Glock’s submission to that of five other manufacturers. Wieser, a twenty-five-year-old career soldier, had an unusually intimate view of the birthing of the Glock. Without contradicting any of the central elements of the story as told by Gaston Glock, and repeated over the years by his admirers, Wieser adds useful political context and a dose of skepticism to the heroic portrait of Glock.
Today, Wieser operates a security-consulting firm in Vienna and serves as a leading forensic adviser to the country’s court system. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of modern pistol technology. In 1979, before Gaston Glock’s opportunistic eavesdropping in the halls of the Defense Ministry, Wieser had supervised tests on potential replacement pistols. These trials found that Beretta offered the most effective model. But Steyr, the long-established Austrian arms maker, which was controlled by the Socialist-dominated government, objected fiercely that a foreign manufacturer should not receive the contract. In response, the defense minister told the Army that if Steyr did not win the competition, then another Austrian company had to be found. Otherwise, the military could end up accused of insufficient patriotism in its procurement. But there wasn’t a suitable alternative company in Austria that already knew how to make handguns. “Mr. Glock was at the right place at the right time,” Wieser told me.
Gaston Glock, through his production of knives, ammunition belts, and other accessories for the Army, had earned a reputation as a dutiful contractor. He had also forged strong ties to Socialist party officials. Colonel Dechant concluded that with meticulous guidance, Glock could be used as a means to build an Austrian pistol to the military’s specifications and to head off a messy confrontation with Steyr.
Dechant brought Hubner into the project because of his vast knowledge about European pistols. Glock’s role was to amalgamate ideas from Dechant and Hubner and borrow the millions of shillings needed to fabricate and test prototypes. This was not a small or unimportant function, Wieser told me. But in his view, Glock was more of a general contractor than a genius inventor. “Without Dechant and Hubner,” Wieser said, “Glock would still be making curtain rings.”
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Wieser did not try to conceal his envy of Gaston Glock’s subsequent fame and wealth. As the Army’s top handgun tester in the early 1980s, Wieser made many suggestions to improve the Glock prototype, but he received no pecuniary reward. No one celebrates his contribution to a revolutionary weapon. “Mr. Glock conveniently forgot about me,” he said.
His bitterness notwithstanding, Wieser emphasized that he conducted a fair and objective competition that pitted the Glock against weapons from Heckler & Koch, Sig Sauer, Beretta, Austria’s Steyr, and Fabrique Nationale of Belgium. Only the Steyr GB pistol held more rounds in its magazine—eighteen—than the Glock’s seventeen. The Heckler & Koch P9S and the Sig Sauer P-220 each held nine; the Beretta 92F, fifteen.
 

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a good historical about Glock. Gaston used a lot of contacts.
My opinion. Modern Firearm History Lesson


The task fell to Lieutenant Ingo Wieser, an aide to Colonel Dechant, to compare Glock’s submission to that of five other manufacturers. Wieser, a twenty-five-year-old career soldier, had an unusually intimate view of the birthing of the Glock. Without contradicting any of the central elements of the story as told by Gaston Glock, and repeated over the years by his admirers, Wieser adds useful political context and a dose of skepticism to the heroic portrait of Glock.
Today, Wieser operates a security-consulting firm in Vienna and serves as a leading forensic adviser to the country’s court system. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of modern pistol technology. In 1979, before Gaston Glock’s opportunistic eavesdropping in the halls of the Defense Ministry, Wieser had supervised tests on potential replacement pistols. These trials found that Beretta offered the most effective model. But Steyr, the long-established Austrian arms maker, which was controlled by the Socialist-dominated government, objected fiercely that a foreign manufacturer should not receive the contract. In response, the defense minister told the Army that if Steyr did not win the competition, then another Austrian company had to be found. Otherwise, the military could end up accused of insufficient patriotism in its procurement. But there wasn’t a suitable alternative company in Austria that already knew how to make handguns. “Mr. Glock was at the right place at the right time,” Wieser told me.
Gaston Glock, through his production of knives, ammunition belts, and other accessories for the Army, had earned a reputation as a dutiful contractor. He had also forged strong ties to Socialist party officials. Colonel Dechant concluded that with meticulous guidance, Glock could be used as a means to build an Austrian pistol to the military’s specifications and to head off a messy confrontation with Steyr.
Dechant brought Hubner into the project because of his vast knowledge about European pistols. Glock’s role was to amalgamate ideas from Dechant and Hubner and borrow the millions of shillings needed to fabricate and test prototypes. This was not a small or unimportant function, Wieser told me. But in his view, Glock was more of a general contractor than a genius inventor. “Without Dechant and Hubner,” Wieser said, “Glock would still be making curtain rings.”
/ / /

Wieser did not try to conceal his envy of Gaston Glock’s subsequent fame and wealth. As the Army’s top handgun tester in the early 1980s, Wieser made many suggestions to improve the Glock prototype, but he received no pecuniary reward. No one celebrates his contribution to a revolutionary weapon. “Mr. Glock conveniently forgot about me,” he said.

His bitterness notwithstanding, Wieser emphasized that he conducted a fair and objective competition that pitted the Glock against weapons from Heckler & Koch, Sig Sauer, Beretta, Austria’s Steyr, and Fabrique Nationale of Belgium. Only the Steyr GB pistol held more rounds in its magazine—eighteen—than the Glock’s seventeen. The Heckler & Koch P9S and the Sig Sauer P-220 each held nine; the Beretta 92F, fifteen.
From this story it sounds like Wieser is being a bit facetious when he says he conducted a "fair and objective competition that pitted the Glock against weapons from Heckler & Koch, Sig Sauer, Beretta, Austria’s Steyr, and Fabrique Nationale of Belgium." Earlier in the story he states the government had already decided that an Austrian company was going to win the contract, no matter what.
The Steyr did not win, so the only other Austrian company with a dog in the fight, did, and the only reason given was mag capacity, Gaston's political connections among socialists, Dechant's military contacts, Wieser's numerous changes to the prototype, and the fact that the Steyr did not, apparently, fair well in trials.
The same story implies that had the Austrian-made requirement not been made, the Beretta would have won the competition handily, and the Glock was entirely chosen for political reasons.

On the bright side, Glock fanboys could probably get their own version of this shirt,
165794


but with the word "COMMUNIST" changed to "SOCIALIST" and a picture of the Glock instead of an AK.

It is also probably best not to scrutinize too hard the former political affiliation of Gaston's "socialist" connections and supporters, or the fact that the whole argument for a domestic contract was based on "nationalism" from a group of Austrian "socialists," many of whom had belonged to an Austrian based socialist nationalist party of some infamy.
 

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And the Berreta 92 isn't? ROFLMAO!
P-38 in an expensive dress and boob job.
Depends on what flavor of European Socialism we are talking about?
 

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And the Berreta 92 isn't? ROFLMAO!
P-38 in an expensive dress and boob job.
Depends on what flavor of European Socialism we are talking about?
The Beretta 92, as originally built, isn't bad. The U.S. version with the American-style mag release is more finnicky than its Euro cousins with the heel release. The 92 could definitely be said to be a product of socialism - every gun it is derived from came out of the Italian Fascist period - but Beretta as a company goes back to feudal Italy. Glock goes back to national socialists in Austria, and most of those guys who were making decisions for the government at the time rose to power entirely because of one of the most evil socialist regimes in history.
 

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I also don't see Glocks company starting off until in the 1960's.
And not making firearms until a decade later.
I do recall Beretta cranking out weapons for Ill Duce's regime and the Nazis.
Some people do what they did to survive.
I've owned and own their products also.
If I judged and boycotted Firearms by the character of their owners, designers or corporate history. I'd own few if any.

But it's a free country and to each their own.
 

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I don't care that much where my firearms are made or by whom. (as long is the quality is good) throughout history, conquers and conquered alike adopted the weapons of their enemies if they were proven to be superior.
 

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But in his view, Glock was more of a general contractor than a genius inventor. “Without Dechant and Hubner,” Wieser said, “Glock would still be making curtain rings.”
 
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