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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got this as an email from a friend who is another Glock Armorer...
Glock Inc. no longer accepting parts orders
I have been a certified armorer since 2004 and over the years placed dozens of parts orders with Smyrna. Right after New Years I filled out a form and sent it in just to replenish my parts box and I got a phone call today telling me that they are no longer processing parts orders because of extreme demand and their inability to fill orders. Lady was very nice but told me she was going to shred my paperwork since it contained by credit card info. Said I should try again later in the year but they would not even enter mine as a backorder.

Now I am not LEO or working for an agency, so it may be different for them. But I found the policy a big shocking for certified armorers that they would not even put mine in the system now.
 

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Parts are a real big demand now. Everything from AR parts to pistol parts. I also am thinking that Glock parts are more in demand now because of the 80% pistols are building. About everyone I know and also on outdoor sites has built at least one or more. Most are Glock platforms and they are scrambling to find parts kits I have noticed on all the sites I hang on.
 

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Is it really they cannot produce the parts, or are they getting pressure from the dark side to make parts hard to get for those building their own.

parts kits on gunbroker of guns broken down and sold with no serialized frame or receiver are routinely selling for more than a like complete firearm.
Parts are a real big demand now. Everything from AR parts to pistol parts. I also am thinking that Glock parts are more in demand now because of the 80% pistols are building. About everyone I know and also on outdoor sites has built at least one or more. Most are Glock platforms and they are scrambling to find parts kits I have noticed on all the sites I hang on.
My suspicious mind went immediately to these thoughts.
There is a lot of demand to build 'sterile' guns right now. But I expect Mister Earpiece to issue an EO any day now.
 

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My suspicious mind went immediately to these thoughts.
There is a lot of demand to build 'sterile' guns right now. But I expect Mister Earpiece to issue an EO any day now.
There already is at least one bill and lawsuits going on now about 80% receivers. I posted a link a few days ago about it. The ATF was asked to re define what constitutes a pistol and firearm and this can go good or maybe bad for us gun owners. You will have to google it to find links as I cant at this second. They want to ban all 80% receivers or re define them as firearms which is nonsense because they are unfinished and non serialized and not a firearm in my eyes.
 

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Trolling in 3...2...1:

Why does one need OEM Glock parts? I thought they were perfect, and the oldest one is only pushing 40.

I have a 143 year old MAS 1873 sitting on my desk right now that was a WWII bringback. It appears to be all original, matching parts, probably fought in two world wars, and maybe even in Africa or Southeast Asia, and is still tight as a drum despite a lot of holster wear and a frosty bore. Shame it wasn't built as perfectly as a Glock.

Trolling over. ;)
 

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Trolling in 3...2...1:

Why does one need OEM Glock parts? I thought they were perfect, and the oldest one is only pushing 40.

I have a 143 year old MAS 1873 sitting on my desk right now that was a WWII bringback. It appears to be all original, matching parts, probably fought in two world wars, and maybe even in Africa or Southeast Asia, and is still tight as a drum despite a lot of holster wear and a frosty bore. Shame it wasn't built as perfectly as a Glock.

Trolling over. ;)
Well, believe it or not, some of us like to actually HAVE spares in case something breaks. I don't know that I've had to replace many Glock recoil springs, but having a couple on hand isn't a bad idea. I've never had to replace a striker spring either, but who knows.

I'm sure if I carry my Glock all over and it goes through some pretty dire things, it'll still work well after I leave the planet. But if I shoot it ALOT, wear parts do wear (and I'll BET the metallurgy today is one helluva lot better than a hundred years ago).

SO it comes down to use. I wonder how that MAS would be holding up if it digested 10 or 15,000 rounds or more. I'm sure that even my really nice metal and wood Smiths might need some work if they had a bunch of full bore heavy ammo through them. And pressures today are ALOT higher than 150 years ago......
 

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The 80% guns will be gone at some point. That is just too easy a target and if the "common sense" background and registration scheme passes. Their whole scheme is to register every gun AND EVERY GUN OWNER and knowing 24/7 where every gun is located. You cannot allow slaves to have guns, it is really that simple, otherwise they might declare their independence from your government.

Or the corollary, if they have guns, they are not slaves. Just because they do not own plantations does not mean that the powder brokers are not treating the general populace like slaves. It is a matter of control, and they want the control,

That reality has scared a lot of us. We just always assume we could buy a broken spring or firing pin, but with the dems in control, they may ban all import gun parts, that creates a shortage and drives up price. Glocks do not beak much but haviing a few spare parts just make sense, hence the panic buying. So, if you gun breaks, better have a second gun. I have known several guys who bought 2 or more copies of the exact gun. 1911s are pretty much interchangeble, old Smith and Wessons, etc. But there are so many new models today, not so. Simple is good. Guns with multiple tiny little springs are the bigger risk, most of the plastic guns have tiny little springs somewhere.
 

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Well, believe it or not, some of us like to actually HAVE spares in case something breaks. I don't know that I've had to replace many Glock recoil springs, but having a couple on hand isn't a bad idea. I've never had to replace a striker spring either, but who knows.

I'm sure if I carry my Glock all over and it goes through some pretty dire things, it'll still work well after I leave the planet. But if I shoot it ALOT, wear parts do wear (and I'll BET the metallurgy today is one helluva lot better than a hundred years ago).

SO it comes down to use. I wonder how that MAS would be holding up if it digested 10 or 15,000 rounds or more. I'm sure that even my really nice metal and wood Smiths might need some work if they had a bunch of full bore heavy ammo through them. And pressures today are ALOT higher than 150 years ago......
I think a better question would be, how many Glocks would still be functional, with all original parts, if they were issued through multiple wars, to multiple soldiers, over the course of 70 +/- years - regardless of the numbers of rounds fired through them? Also, how many rounds do you suppose were fired through each gun, in training or play alone, over the course of the last 15 decades?

Most militaries using Glocks surplus them after a decade or so of use. The MAS soldiered on in parts of the world for more than a century before being replaced - and usually in tropical places with jungles and sea air or with blasting sands and high heat. I'm not talking about the MAS as a model, I am saying that individual guns served non-stop from the 1870s through VE day, and the Viet Minh/Cong continued to issue these guns into the 1970s. (As a side note, did you know the Austrian Navy rejected Glocks for years, in favor of the Steyr, because Glocks react poorly to long exposure to sea air without constant maintenance)

As for the difference in ammo, that Glock is shooting nice, factory spec, non-corrosive ammo. That MAS spent half of it's life shooting corrosive black powder cartridges with corrosive primers, often made to iffy specs by prisoners - and French prisoners at that, and the second half of its service life shooting cordite with slightly less corrosive primers through brass sometimes sourced from melted down church bells.
 

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The only "saving clause" going at the moment is that the Glocks( or any other guns) won't get shot a lot with ammo being scarce. So wear and tear is probably pretty low right now.

My own shooting is dialed way back right now. Snow and cold is part of it. Conservatism is another.

But you never know when a spring will break.
 

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The 80% guns will be gone at some point. That is just too easy a target and if the "common sense" background and registration scheme passes. Their whole scheme is to register every gun AND EVERY GUN OWNER and knowing 24/7 where every gun is located. You cannot allow slaves to have guns, it is really that simple, otherwise they might declare their independence from your government.

Or the corollary, if they have guns, they are not slaves. Just because they do not own plantations does not mean that the powder brokers are not treating the general populace like slaves. It is a matter of control, and they want the control,

That reality has scared a lot of us. We just always assume we could buy a broken spring or firing pin, but with the dems in control, they may ban all import gun parts, that creates a shortage and drives up price. Glocks do not beak much but haviing a few spare parts just make sense, hence the panic buying. So, if you gun breaks, better have a second gun. I have known several guys who bought 2 or more copies of the exact gun. 1911s are pretty much interchangeble, old Smith and Wessons, etc. But there are so many new models today, not so. Simple is good. Guns with multiple tiny little springs are the bigger risk, most of the plastic guns have tiny little springs somewhere.
Meh...not that worried. And if it gets that far the guns will be in use anyway.

Wish Ten Man hadn't (to some extent rightly) gotten spooked off the site early (big OPSEC kinda guy but had some pretty good ideas from time to time). He had good insight as to how to manage this scenario to a T--like many of us have.

MOST of us have ample spares and this is one argument for having common types and modular designs. The more prepared of us will be able to easily can parts (if necessary) from other platforms depending on ammo availability -- well into the next century. But I think our fate will be decided one way or another sooner rather than later. The 'come and take it' crowd is huge at this point. And 80 million pizzed off people is alot. NONE of those folks are interested in the 'compromise' where compromise means we always lose. Lots of NFW folks out there. And the communists are blowing their wad pretty early; so much so that the states are starting to formally introduce legislation to negate the feds. This is real and will pit locals against the feds if it comes to that. That step is just short of secession style conflict. Just needs a spark like some EPA clown rolling into North Dakota.

The '80%s' will still exist; they may simply be home grown and manufactured rather than from a commercial source. Plenty of 3D printers, VPNs, and the like out there.

Methinks the parts issues stem more from the same concept as primer shortages; the manufacturer wants the parts for themselves and THEIR guns. It's analogous to reloading but with hardware.

FWIW, a source close to me manufactures machine parts and has been going full bore all out with slides and gas keys. The gas key thing kinda caught me off guard in that they're not a failure prone component (much less than a bolt) but someone is ordering a shiteload of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have a 143 year old MAS 1873 sitting on my desk right now
End to troll..do you have parts when it breaks? All man made things need repair...can you make the parts if you need to? How many MAS 1873 exist today in working order? We all know you hate Glock....so be it.
 

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End to troll..do you have parts when it breaks? All man made things need repair...can you make the parts if you need to? How many MAS 1873 exist today in working order? We all know you hate Glock....so be it.
Yes, parts are available from multiple companies, but most surviving examples are in working order. 337,000 of them were made. Of that roughly 120,000 are still accounted for and in working order. Most of the rest were either lost to time, or destroyed by the last government that used them. The MAS 1873 was designed with every tool needed for maintenance and repair built in and could be fully repaired in the field if necessary.
It is generally listed among the most well-built military firearms of all time, and is among only a handful of firearms designs in world history to see a century of military use around the world with no changes whatsoever.
The design was so good that the French GIGN still uses essentially the third gen of this design. Only three generations of improvements were needed over the course of a century and a half.

Glock is on Gen 5. In 40 years. There is a billion dollar industry based around making the guns better with secondary parts.

A Glock is a pure tool. It is made to essentially be disposable. There is nothing wrong with that.
In the old days militaries made things generational. Nothing wrong with that either.
According to Glock, 115,000 Gen 1 Glocks were made over a 10 year span, compared to 337,000 MAS 1873s over a 72 year span. 36% of one type of gun still exists even though production ended 76 years ago. Would you be willing to bet that more than 36% of Glock Gen 1s used by militaries are still around even though production ended in 1991? Do you believe 36% of them - regardless of who bought and used them - will still be functional a century from now?

If a cop or a soldier was issued a Glock today, what is the likelihood that his grandson will be issued the exact same gun or one old enough to have served with the grandfather? In French territory, the likelihood for three generations of officers was 100%. Planet wide, the chances of three generations of soldiers being issued the same spec and vintage Glock has to be approaching zero.
 

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Glock is on Gen 5. In 40 years. There is a billion dollar industry based around making the guns better with secondary parts.
Not to get TOO far down the Glock rabbit hole.

BUT

You can say the same thing for customizing ARs. In alot of ways, this is a tribute to their design and success. You can customize the base gun for YOU.

I know of few off the shelf guns that 'fit' me and my shooting style. Some come pretty close, but it's more like fitting the head to the hat. My Smith 69 combat magnum is a decent gun; it's hammer/internals were a bit too heavy and 'sproinky' for my tastes (compared to the slicked up old Smith 64s--they themselves having had a smoothing trigger job at some point well before they got to me). The rubber grips weren't real suitable (pachmyrs are better for shooting the heavy loads; the Altamont a REALLY well hand fitting design for carry and shooting the 44 special loads but I'm not sure I'd want to put the full house magnums through). So I modded it with an Apex hammer (unfortunately the trigger return spring due to the design really CAN'T be lowered much) with a smoother feel and better DA lock time, and the (beautiful) Altamont grips. But this was harder to do than on many Glocks. AND -- while the 'red ramp' is classic and Smith, it's not nearly as good as my XS DXT's or F8's for low light work. And not likely to be easily replaced in that this involves substantial effort (yes, I AM capable of replacing a pinned front sight and filing open the rear or even dismantling the Smith rear sight and putting in a new blade; both are harder than pushing out a Glock rear sight and screwing in a big dot in a setup Taylor made for it).

So, much like an AR, a Glock can be tailored to a PERSONAL gun -- that is if one can get over the basic blocky feel and pointing angle. Easily. And THAT's their forte, IMHO. Now, I REALLY like the ergo of my VP-40 better (even though the Glock triggers with a smoothening Ghost connector or the base gen 5's comes close to the trigger). But even on it I'd prefer a different sighting system (which in the .40 isn't all THAT readily available and a bit more tricky than the Glock). Not to mention the HKs are significantly more expensive than the Glocks.

So the bottom line is I don't see this aftermarket stuff as a failing, more like an advantage in that a person can get a stripped down (cheap--or at least used to be cheap) version and then customize it how they want (much like building an M4).

Much like in the heyday of revolvers, striker pistols of ALL kinds have gone through evolutionary changes (while an old Webley or top break smith might be FUN, both cartridge AND revolver evolved substantially through the 30's; lest we forget the first registered magnums -- the smith 27s--weren't issued until the 30's and Elmer would later blow up several guns morphing the .44 special into the .44 Magnum. Bill Jordan would work with Smith to create the model 19 during this heyday; of which my stainless model 69 is a grandson of).

So I think we need to keep apples to apples. There ARE some 'timeless' designs folks like, but it's largely personal preference. I LIKE my 1911s, but the tactical Tupperware has greater capacity, greater reliability, more easily user-serviceable parts, and I don't feel bad when it falls in the mud with me. It's not correct to 'knock' one design over another; simply that for a given mission things have evolved. While I love the feel of my M69 with the new grips, only having 5 shots in the cylinder and non-hi-viz sights gives me pause when I'm a long distance from a rifle/PDW/home in fading light.
 
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Ii am sure that much of what Glock is producing now is heading straight out to law enforcement agencies. I dont see how they have the time to make for the public with all the government contracts they have to fulfill.
 

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If we make it through this with our skins attached the next big headline will involve them whining about not being able to sell anything due to everyone already having what they need. Yeah, we had to lay off one million people.
 
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