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goverment leting people die of starvation to "protect" them.

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Doglips, Aug 26, 2002.

  1. Doglips

    Doglips G&G Newbie

    I seen this on ABC news Tonight...the link is from CNN...abc has not posted it on their web site.

    Basicly the people over there are starveing....the USA has sent sveral hundres of Tons of food...it sits stacked in wearhouses. Their goverment refuses to let it be given to the starveing people because it is "genetically modified" and they are not sure it is healthy. This to me is such an extream example of 2 things.
    1. goverment leting people die of starvation to "protect" them.
    2. The need for people to have the right to firearms. The people starveing are pissed off but unarmed so cant do nothing but starve.
    3. How our goverment continues to give to othe countries...long after they said no thank you go away.


    GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) -- Genetically modified food is the only way to feed the starving population in Zambia, the U.N. has said.

    James Morris, head of the U.N. food agency, said: "There is no way that the World Food Program can provide the resources to feed these starving people without using food that has some biotech content."

    It is estimated that almost 2.5 million people in Zambia are in danger of starvation if they do not receive urgent aid.

    An additional 10.3 million in five other southern African countries -- Zimbabwe, Malawi, Mozambique, Lesotho and Swaziland -- urgently need help to avoid mass starvation caused by erratic weather and exacerbated by government mismanagement in some countries.

    But the Zambian government so far has refused to accept donations of food that is genetically modified.
     
  2. Doglips

    Doglips G&G Newbie

    Zambia rejects U.N. appeal to accept biotech food
    August 24, 2002 Posted: 11:24 PM HKT (1524 GMT)



    Loveness Chibabi, left, with her son Michael, and sister Peggy, leave a World Food Program food distribution center with bags of food atop their heads at Ngombe, Zambia, Saturday August 10.


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    LUSAKA, Zambia (AP) -- The Zambian government rejected Saturday a United Nations appeal to lift a ban on the distribution of genetically modified food, saying it would be able to procure enough other grain to feed its starving people.

    "We have the situation under control," Zambian Agriculture Minister Mundia Sikatana said. "We don't need to engage the biotechnology at this stage."

    The major U.N. food and health agencies -- the World Food Program, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization -- released a policy statement Friday saying as far as they were concerned genetically modified foods were safe.

    Aid agencies estimated almost 2.5 million Zambians are in danger of starvation if they do not receive urgent aid.

    "There is no way that the World Food Program can provide the resources to feed these starving people without using food that has some biotech content," spokesman James Morris told reporters.

    But Sikatana said the safety of the grain remained unproven.

    "We cannot be so irresponsible so as to risk the lives of innocent people," he said in a telephone interview. "We have measures in place to cover (food needs for) the period up to the next harvest. We are assisting (hungry people) with help from well-wishers and are overwhelmed by the response."

    Zambia is concerned genetically modified food may be a health risk, or that grains of cereal may be used for planting, contaminating the country's non-GM crops and putting at risk trade with the European Union and other countries that have strict rules on biotech crops.

    The United Nations estimates 12.8 million people in Zambia and five other Southern African countries -- Zimbabwe, Malawi, Mozambique, Lesotho and Swaziland -- urgently need help to avoid mass starvation.

    Copyright 2002 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.