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hey all, this is my first post, so I figured id make it a good one. I came across my 1903 in a batch of guns I inherited from my grandfather, and unfortunately somewhere down the line somebody (not my grandfather) sporterized the gun, and id like to undo the damage as much as possible.

first off im not much of a gunsmith. my skill set is more geared toward the 4 wheeled v8 variety, but I have a decent amount of common sense so id like to take a whack at it. id like to put it back in an original looking stock, and put on some original sights (a flip up rear if its accurate). any info or parts suppliers you guys could give me would be greatly appreciated. and im not opposed to repop parts, i know some of the damage cant be undone, and i dont plan on selling the gun, so I figure even new parts can make it better than it is now.

ive done a little research, I know its a springfield made 1903, lower numbered serial and dated 7-44. im not sure if its an a1 or a3, or what stock or sights to use..any help would be appreciated.

heres a few pics for reference








 

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Honestly, it looks as if your barrel has been shortened, altered and the receiver drilled. You'd be better off to enjoy your grandfather's as it is and get yourself another 1903 in original war trim. You'd probably be spending the same amount of money either way.

For sport shooting purposes, you can do a lot worse than a 1903. How does it shoot?

Oh, and a hearty WELCOME to the forum!!!
 

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Honestly, it looks as if your barrel has been shortened, altered and the receiver drilled. You'd be better off to enjoy your grandfather's as it is and get yourself another 1903 in original war trim. You'd probably be spending the same amount of money either way.

For sport shooting purposes, you can do a lot worse than a 1903. How does it shoot?

Oh, and a hearty WELCOME to the forum!!!
its a great shooting gun, ive put alot of rounds through it over the course of my life. do you have the correct barrel length so I could check and see if it has been shortened. and what does it mean to have the reciever drilled?
 

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great info thank you very much, I definitely knew none of that haha. does anyone know what the markings on the end of the barrel are? I mistook them for manufacture date, according to that first link my gun was made in 1909
Yep, it is manufacture date of the barrel. Many of the WWI Springfields were rebarreled in WWII. That is how I guessed the barrel had been shortened.

That Month - Year is generally behind the front site with a flaming cannon ball and a manufacturer initials in front of it.

Top of Barrel Markings - Photo by SoCalOCMan03
 

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Restoration of a nice old 03

Here's my advice, after trying to 'polish many turds': Just leave it alone. It has been tapped for a scope, it is low numbered, it has a sawed-off World War 2 barrel which may be either for a 1903 or 03A3, and the stock is not original.

I think that it is delightful just the way it is. Keep it as a remembrance of ol' grandpaw. You will spend way too much money trying to make something out of it. Original stocks go for hundreds of dollars, in any kind of shape. So do original barrels. Then you have the problem of nothing looking right, after all the replacement parts have been collected and installed. None of them have the same finish nor the same amount of wear. They will just look goofy.

Then, the final problem to face is the two holes in the receiver. Weld them shut? Who can do that correctly and have it look nice?

Naw. man, buy a nice old 1940s Weaver scope and mounts from the old days and put them on her, and appreciate her for what she is, a 1940s sporter made out of an old warhorse.

Just my humble opinion, but I have down that road before.

(I do like the looks of those serifs on that old receiver. It is just too bad that someone butchered it up like that, but that is what people did back in the 49s and 50s.) The NRA advises not shooting those low-numbered receivers, but I feel that is a personal choice.
 

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thanks for the info felix, its looking more and more likely like ill just put her back in the gun safe and take it out to oil every now and again. now ive gotta look for my warhorse (as you put it) to put in the collection
 

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I'm referring to the tapped holes in front of and behind the top of the receiver. It was drilled/tapped for a scope at some point.

Just my humble opinion...put the scope back on it and keep it a sporter.

By the time you, undo all the sporterizing...you probably could have bought a reasonably nice 1903 or 1903A3(...the WWII made variant).

I have a 1903A3. It was made in 1943 by Smith Corona. It is pictured here with a WWII rebarreled Model of 1917 which fought WWI alongside your Springfield.

 

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you have 2 beautiful guns my friend. not that im unhappy with mine, its got a helluva story im sure....just wish it was still ww1 or 2 esk in appearance. but I guess for an 107 year old gun thats most likely been through 2 wars it in pretty good shape haha.
 

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The neat thing those rifles have in common is that neither was built by a regular firearms manufacturer. The Model of 1917 was made by Baldwin Locomotive Works at Eddystone and the Model of 1903A3 was made by a typewriter manufacturer. It is a reminder that back in the great wars, EVERYONE was involved in the war effort.
 

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The neat thing those rifles have in common is that neither was built by a regular firearms manufacturer. The Model of 1917 was made by Baldwin Locomotive Works at Eddystone and the Model of 1903A3 was made by a typewriter manufacturer. It is a reminder that back in the great wars, EVERYONE was involved in the war effort.
it is pretty cool, I think I read in one of those links that american bowling and billiards made some stocks for these guns. amazing how things worked back then.

im just getting started but I want to have a good collection of era items onea these days. a garand and another 1903 are first two on my list.
 

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Louisville Slugger made M1 Carbine stocks...Actually, if you look at the various companies that made M1 carbines, Winchester was the only 1 of the 10 manufacturers that made 6 million M1 Carbines during WWII that was an arms company.
 
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