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Hornady SST and gun caliber

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by kenjs1, Jul 22, 2002.

  1. kenjs1

    kenjs1 G&G Newbie

    6
    0
    Texas
    I have heard praise about Hornady SST ammo and want to use it on deer. My problem is that I wonder if the version in 100grain, coming out of my 6mm, might be too light to be effective on a very large deer or hog? I was advised by a reasonable source that the SST in 100gr. was probably not heavy enough. I was ok with that until I remembered that most folks using a similar .243 prefer the 87grain hollow points and they drop deer like nothing else. I don't handload and have to rely on factory stuff and am asking if I am right to think of the SST as a sort of souped up hollow point that ought to have similar result characteristics? Will the bullet hold together etc.. Interested in hearing from someone on this.
     
  2. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    I love the SST. Yes it is like a souped up hollow point. It is a very efficient bullet due to it's boattail design for stability as it leaves the barrel,high ballistic coefficient, and pointed end. As far as using it for hunting- it is very effective at farther ranges than lets say 50-90 yards. The controlled expansion due to its beefed up wall thickness and cannelure make it great for deer. I haven't used any on hog as yet but i use a .270 with 130 or 140 grain bullets so no problem. But the little battletanks deserve a fair shot to send 'em to hogheaven a 100 grain shot may not make it through the tough shoulder armor a mature boar may have as it is like a hollow point, but a well placed shot between the eyes square in his noodle i would think would make him grill meat rather quickly!
    I have been reloading the 140 grain noslers ballistic tip and my rifle does better with the heavier bullet as far as accuracy.
    Since you stated you don't reload try the Hornady Light magnums they aren't sst bullets but seem to be very accurate. Most folks i talk with that don't reload have real good luck with the expensive Federal ammunition, just a thought.
     

  3. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    One more thought came to mind - The 100 grain bullet for your 6mm, though light should do the job at closer ranges with no problem. In my opinion using something with a ballistic tip will give you the shock(or knock down power) you will need. The strengthened wall should give you the penetration, without the bullet self destructing.
    My bro. in law uses a .243 on big ole NY bucks year after year with no problems, we all pick on him for using a small gun, but he is set on it and it works for him. But I have noticed he tries to keep his shots under like 200 yards, and normally he does have to track the deer if it is a long shot. I would say try buying one of the premium factory ammo out there with a partition bullet, but at real close ranges they may tend to zip right through a deer with little damage. I know little about them but for hog i am assuming they may be better. maybe someone else can give you more info. on that? Good luck
     
  4. kenjs1

    kenjs1 G&G Newbie

    6
    0
    Texas
    thanks tonto

    thanks for the thoughts Tonto. I have a bundle of ammo coming from the internet and will try all of them. I originally tried the Fed. partitions and the accuracy wasn't that great. I have since floated my barrel and that changed things a little. I have some handmade partitions in 95gr that shot a little better. The same guy is making me some 100 grain partitions and 100grain soft points. I also am waiting on some federal hi-shock in 100 gr. and will take all of it, and the SST's, to the range. I tried the Hornady light mag's and they shot very well. I was worried about them not expanding on closer shots though. Last time out it seemed the Federal hi-shock shot best and it is an average priced round (their Nosler's are pricey -you are right). I appreciate your response but can you still see the ambiguity in it? I would love the bullet god to come down, hand me a box and say "here my son - use only this" ya know. I guess I will look at it optimistically as now I have lots of toys I can take to the range and call it work when I talk to the wife. BTW - how big are the deer in NY that were taken with that .243? We have some Axis here (Texas) that go over the 200lb mark regularly and I am wanting to take another one of them boys with the 6mm - I took one last year with Dad's 7mm mag. "Man's" gun. He has since shot a larger one (so he says!!!). I figure to take a huge deer with my new little 6mm, regain bragging rights, and make him eat all them comments about my woman's rifle. Isn't that what is really all about ??? Hope to hear back from you Tonto.
     
  5. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    Ha ha That's exactly what they tell my Bro. in Law about the .243
    He has been getting all 4 pointers dressing out like
    160-220 tops , up there we don't always wait for the "next bigger one" if it has antlers its game.
    The main reason I don't care to much for the .243 is I like to see the deer drop right in their tracks without having to run through the prickly ash and other picker bushes to find them. Of course he is a big man and I am rather small so i just follow in his wake:D

    I found my reloads weren't any better than factory "custom" ammo until i learned about seating the bullet a little farther out than the minimum length like the factory stuff. My rifles performance tripled as benchresting i got 3 round groups that were one ragged hole at 100 yards dead nuts in the center of the bull. There is no really easy way to figure your rifles length without a micrometer/slide rule. But how i got started was i took a sized empty case and set a bullet in it then I loaded the round and then carefully ejected it. then i measured the results and subtracted like .005" from it. The results will astound you, and it is real custom ammo tailored for your rifle! It all seems to boil down to the bullet being closer to the start of the rifling therefore no power is lost and eliminating bullet jump (i am guessing)also don't always be inclined to have your friend make them smoking fast, the bullets loaded on the slower end of the reloading scale tend to be more accurate, consistent.
    Allot of folks down here in florida use .223,.243 and 6mm for deer and the deer are a good size, of course most all use an autoloader. Not just for quicker follow up shots , but also because they run dogs and the deer normally fly by at about the speed of sound! My advice if you are dead set on using the 6mm is keep the shots to the vital area and or neck. Do not try to regain your bragging rights by taking a head shot- I got to track a doe this last season with her bottom jaw hanging, really shook me up. I meant to pop her in back of the ears but the bullet popped her jaw off YOU DONOT WANT TO GO THROUGH THAT.
    Any how good luck and i hope this helps.
     
  6. kenjs1

    kenjs1 G&G Newbie

    6
    0
    Texas
    hiya Tonto - good hearing from you. I was on this post earlier and must have just missed you by a second. Sorry about your Doe - ouch, breaks your heart. No worries about head shots from me. I am a heart \vitals guy strictly and won't even shoot through grass as I like to see the exact spot on the deer before pulling the trigger. Great info on reloading and it jives with what another guy wrote about seating the bullet - never thought of it. Love learning stuff like that- thanks for the info. My problem is getting the ammo after I order it - I still am waiting to receive ammo from two different places for three weeks now. I need to find what works best and buy all on hand. I am still waffling on the sst's but I did see a pic of a nice 190lb mulie taken with it in 6mm at 264yards. Encouraging! BTW- I am a smaller guy too, maybe why I relate to the 6mm -eh??
     
  7. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    Just got done shooting the breeze with a feller down here that dropped a 240 lb hog in her tracks(dead weight, not dressed) with a .17 rimfire magnum at 60 yards. Drilled it right into her head one shot she fell immediately. I just bought one myself but haven't got to hunt with it. The reason i am telling you this is Hornady developed that caliber last year using the ballistic tip like the SST bullets. If a 17 grain bullet can do it I think a 100 grain SST 6mm will get'er done.
    I would hope up to 200 yards. Good luck
     
  8. kenjs1

    kenjs1 G&G Newbie

    6
    0
    Texas
    Hi Tonto, good hearing from you. With a .17??? It made it through that skull - holy cow that's either really gutsy or plain old self defense. I took the hornady's to the range and they shot pretty well. I found a nice pic on the net from a site advertising " the drop-in-sator". This gizmo you put on top of your scope adjuster that is supposed to automatically compensate height at a given range ....yeah...well anyway...the pic was of a nice big mule deer that went 190lbs that was dropped with the 6mm hornady at 264yards. Encouraging. I had a bad experience wit hthe hand loaded stuff I got- seemed to blow up in the chamber. Not too happy 'bout that. Looks like I may stay with store bought for peace of mind.
     
  9. Alwby

    Alwby G&G Newbie

    tonto,
    Good observations. However one technical point. Bullets that expand at longer range do not "zip through" at closer range. Velocity makes bullets expand. The problem is that a bullet that expands adequately and still gives good penetration at closer ranges where velocity is higher, may not expand at longer ranges and lower velocity. The challenge of bullet construction is to come up with bullets that will expand at longer ranges, yet not expand so much at closer ranges that bullets come apart and do not penetrate.
     
  10. kenjs1

    kenjs1 G&G Newbie

    6
    0
    Texas
    hello Alwby

    true enough - and yep, that Tonto is all right! So regarding expansion\penetration when considering different distances, what do you think about the Hornady SST as a likely choice in 95 grain for my 6mm? I see my max shot at about 225 yards on a deer. I wrote Hornady and finally got a response that seemed more an advertisement than an answer. Still, at least they did reply saying it is perfect for even larger deer and hogs in my 6mm with the above grain. Starting to lean heavily that way. Love to hear any comments.
     
  11. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    ALWBY I stand corrected, it came to me as I read your reply, all i found from a 4 pointer years ago taken at close range was copper shrapnels with a big exit channel and allot of bloodshot meat for the dogs.
    Kenjs1 I from all the research and all that goes on down here in florida go for it with the 6mm, there are more taken year after year with that caliber and no problems, I do see in the long ranges where it may not retain allot of its power and wind frift can also be a problem, but keep the shots around 250 and less with good broadside shots.
     
  12. If you're going to change ammo length, be wary of signs of high pressure. You change the pressure by having the bullet too quick into the rifling. I try to stay .020" off the rifling and fine tune with powder charge. Also, Federal doesn't clean up the flash hole area in their brass as well as they should. The burrs in that area result in inconsistent ignition and inconsistent accuracy because of the ignition.