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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an old Marlin Model 336-A chambered for the .32 Special. How much would this gun be worth? or would i be better of with keeping it as a collectors item?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
so then then should i hold onto it or sell it? it used to be my dads old hunting rifle from when he was a kid. i have no idea what year it is. i just know its in real good condition. hasnt been shot in a real long time. i actually just bought some .32 special ammo to go shoot through it but i havent had a chance yet
 

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If you shoot, hunt, collect guns or would like a keepsake from your dad...I would hold on to it; especially since it's from your dad and it's in really good condition. Might not hurt to give it a fresh cleaning before you go shoot it, and then one afterwards. Oh, does it have factory drilled holes in the receiver for a scope mount?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i wouldnt even know where to begin on cleaning a lever action rifle. only things ive ever cleaned are my sks and bolt action rifles
 

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Here's a pdf manual of the Marlin 336 rifle, that you could use for a basic cleaning guide: http://www.marlinfirearms.com/pdfs/manuals/MFC_Centerfire.pdf. In mentioning to clean the rifle before shooting, I was being cautious that nothing got itself into the bore/barrel and that it's clear. If it wasn't a rifle your dad used to own and hunt with, and the sentimental value associated with it, I'd probably try to buy it from you. But, in years to come it'll be of far more value for you to have a rifle your dad owned and that you can later pass down to one of your children.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
alright thank you. reason i was considering selling/trading in is that i want an ak. the .32 special round is a bit expensive for my just plinking around. the ak round on the other hand is alot cheaper. i'll take your advice though and just keep it around. even if i dont shoot its still a good looking gun
 

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Since you asked, my suggestion would be to prize the rifle your dad gave to you and save up for an AK. The older you get the more the sentimental value of that gift will mean to you; especially if you and your dad are close and still enjoy shooting and hunting together. Years ago I sold a rifle my dad gave me, for something else I thought I wanted. My dad's gone now, and so is the rifle he gave me. Personal perspective...all the decision about what to do with this awesome rifle is in your hands. Also, whether or not the rifle has factory drilled holes in the receiver for mounting a scope will help you get a general idea of how old it is. From what I've read, Marlin didn't start drilling holes for a scope mount until 1957 or later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
No holes drilled in the reciever. The only number i can find on it is JL9957. Or it might me J19957. Idk where i would look to decifer what that means. Found a place online and it said with that serial number it was made in 1952.
 

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To start off, here's a couple of places to look for that info... Try this site Marlin Manufacture Dates, and then try Marlin 336 Dates of Manufacture. Hopefully you'll have an answer from one of them... Also, with there being no holes drilled in the receiver for a scope mount, it's probably in the neighborhood of a pre-57 rifle. Also, I have a couple of Marlin's lever guns and they're good, dependable rifles...despite what some may say who favor the Winchester equivalents more.
 

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My Modern Gun Values book says:

Perfect: $290
Excellent: $250
Verygood: $200
 

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Also, there's a good magazine for helping you learn a lot more about that rifle, and other lever guns too. It's the Winter 2000 issue of Rifle Magazine's Special Edition titled " The Legacy of Lever Guns". You can purchase a copy of the magazine from Wolfe Publishing on-line, or by calling them toll-free at (800) 899-7810. The cost is $7... Nick112207, all that being said, let me know what you decide on whether to keep or sell the rifle. The 32 special is one I'd like to add to my collection, and NRAJOE helped you see what it's market value is. However, I do hope you decide to keep it.
 

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During my youth, 30+ years ago, I took a 32 special lever action out shooting and then deer hunting...and it was great! Compared to a 30-30, it's similar in ballistics, being just slightly more powerful in energy delivery than the 30-30: i.e. using a 170 grain bullet, with same length of barrel, the 30-30 shoots at 2100 fps and the 32 special is 2200 fps; according to the most recent reloading data available in the 7th addition of Hornady's Reloading Manual. (Higher fps can be achieved with a lighter weight bullet, up to and over 2400 fps.) Felt recoil difference would be hard to recognize and bullet drop at 200 yards would be very similar to the 30-30. As you may know, Hornady makes a new bullet for lever actions called Leverevoultion, which would work great in the 32 special, if you can find them. It's an excellent brush gun, with serious performance up to and including 200 yard shots - with best performance at 100-150 yards. A better shooter could easily drop a dear at 200 yards. The round is powerful enough for smaller bear, deer, and about any varmint you'd like to plink at. At a closer ranges, 150 yards and less, I have no doubt that it would drop an elk...with the bullet placed in the heart/lung area. The rifle can be easily scoped, for the longer shots, but doing so changes its collector's value, and it wasn't really designed for longer shots. It's a very good brush gun, for hunting in the woods. Because of it's lower velocity, the needed fps to generate higher energy on impact, for the 32 caliber round, is somewhat limited. But, comparing it to other lower or higher powered rifles (shooting bullets at much faster feet per second speeds) is an apples to oranges comparison. It's a great saddle gun too... There, lots of personal opinion mixed with some shooting/bullet data that you can reference to see if it meets your particular needs.
 

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Ive got a 32-20 remington pump rifle from my dad, never thought of it as a deer rifle although my mother used it as one before i was born. My dad gave it to her because there was no kick to it. Ive only shot it a few time because the ammo is hard to find and it is expensive.Does anyone know if I could shoot 32 special or 32 rem. mag in it?

I do have a marlin 336 in 35 caliber that I hunt with.Good knock down power.
 

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"Most 32-20 rifles will also chamber and shoot the 32 S&W Long and Short, the .32 Colt, The 7.5 Nagant revolver Cartridge," and a couple more Obsolete cartridges. However this is just for use in a pinch, not to be reccommended as a general practice...This is a Quote from Cartridges of the world.
Rich
 

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The gun is a Keeper for sure. Especially if someone is only offering you book value. We all know that's crap. I've seen them sell for $350. It was in such bad shape I laughed at the dealer. Keep it.
 

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I have my grandfathers old double barrel shotgun. It is nothing fancy, and the stock lost it's recoil pad, when my grandfather lent it to his cousin who was shot carrieing it. I will never sell it, it is the only gun that was ever handed down to me.
 

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I agree, guns like this are meant to stay in the family. I've got the Marlin 39A .22 that my dad bought for me used in 1975. It's a pre-57 model as well. I plan on giving it to my youngest grandson in a few years with the instructions to either pass it on to one of his kids or give it to someone else in the family if he ever decides he doesn't want it. There's actually a cute story behind this. The first time I let him shoot it, we were out bird-hunting on a slow day. I pulled out the newly-scoped Marlin and my shooting bag. As I was loading the gun, he asked what I was doing. I just loaded the gun, set my shooting bag on the ground, and walked out to about 25-30 yds and set down an empty Win. shotshell box. I walked back, handed him the gun, showed him how to sit on the ground and rest the gun on my shooting bag and told him what to do. I watched and instructed him for awhile, then backed off and let him shoot. He hit the box every time despite a 10-15 mph cross-wind. After he'd burned through a 100 rd. box and we were going home, he sort of ducked his head and said "Pappa, do you think you'll ever get tired of your .22?" I said I didn't know, but that I really liked it. He replied:"Well, if you ever do get tired of it, could you maybe give it to me? I've got lots of money in my piggy-bank to buy you another one if you want!" How can you argue with a deal like that? :D
 
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