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i got questions?

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by rookie, Mar 24, 2002.

  1. rookie

    rookie G&G Newbie

    Hello everybody,
    i have no experience with guns...i turn 21 this summer and want to get a handgun. I already got my foid card so i'm set there. i eventually want to go into law enforcement and I am looking for a gun to learn on and practice my shooting. What would you recomend???? Where is the best place to look for guns??? How much can i plan on spending on a gun?? Should i subscribe to any handgun mags to help with educating me about handguns? if so, which is the best???
    thanks for any help or advice...don't worry i will have more questions!!!
     
  2. Klaus

    Klaus G&G Newbie

    Ruger makes a nice .22 pistol that is great for practice. I think it is called a .22/45. It has a 1911 .45 style grip. For a service gun, I would recommend Glock, Mauser, CZ, Sig, and Walther. I am kinda partial to the .40 SW, but .45 acp and .357 Sig are good too. They are a bit pricey, though. I have heard many good tings about the Ruger semiautomatic pistols. 9mm still works, if you get a good deal on the gun, but it is not as effective as the others I mentioned. I strongly recommend taking some shooting and safety courses. For concealed carry, you can get a used AMT Backup, a derringer, Makarov, or one of the Kel-Tecs.
     

  3. wes

    wes G&G Newbie

    Hi rookie. You are going to get a billion ideas. First and foremost is safety,more so with a handgun. You cannot make a mistake. As for what to get,try a few and see what YOU like,some places will rent a gun to try out. Get some formal firearms instruction,the NRA has a very good program and should have some certified instructors in your area. Read EVERYTHING you can about guns. Figure around $500.00 for a good,reliable gun. Also,different shooting disciplines requrie different techniques,target shooting is not combat shooting and vise-versa. Hope this helps some and welcome, ask away,you'll get plenty of help here.
     
  4. rookie

    rookie G&G Newbie

    Can you tell me what to look for in a gun? for example, when i look for a computer i look for a computer with a lot of ram, big monitor, dvd player, etc.....
     
  5. wes

    wes G&G Newbie

    Guns are the same,what do you want to do with it?
     
  6. rookie

    rookie G&G Newbie

    i read about people get differnt barrels and stuff like that...i just want to learn what makes up a gun...is there any good websites that talk about that or books?
    thanks
     
  7. MangesMade

    MangesMade G&G Newbie

    Find out what the officers use where you'll be applying, that way you'll be learning on what you'll be carrying. If you are going to go into law enforcement, wait on them, they will teach you properly and you won't be learning bad habits.
     
  8. Klaus

    Klaus G&G Newbie

    In general, longer barrels give you more power, more accuracy, and less kick. They also make the gun bulkier, heavier, and slower to draw. Police guns are either revolvers or semiautomatics. A revolver has a cylindrical peice that has chambers that hold the ammunition (usually 6 rounds); it is called a cylinder. Semiautomatic pistols hold ammo in a spring loaded case, called a box magazine; many people mistakenly call it a "clip". A semiautomatic firearm shoots 1 round with each trigger pull, then uses some of the energy to eject the empty case, cock the hammer, and load a fresh round, so it is ready to shoot again.
    Pistols can have two types of triggers, Single Action and Double Action. In single action, the trigger only does 1 thing, it releases the cocked hammer or striker to fire a shot. A Double Action trigger does two things, first it will cock the hammer (if it is not already cocked), then it will release it. On a double action semiautomatic pistol, normally only the first shot is DA, since the gun cocks the hammer after the shot, so the rest are SA. I hope this is enough info to get you going.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2002
  9. rookie

    rookie G&G Newbie

    cool...thanks for the input!
     
  10. Shaun

    Shaun G&G Newbie

    Also study and learn about other guns remember as an LEO you will come into contact with anything and you should have a familiarity with their operation as you do not want an accidental discharge. Some departments allow the officers to carry what they want as long as it meets several requirements. But realize that can change with every new administration. I would do like the others said take a good NRA safety course then back it up with a hunter safety course - remember you will be handling shotguns in the job. Then of course the department/academy will train you more. One of the biggest issues grab any training you can get
     
  11. wes

    wes G&G Newbie

    Shaun, really agree on any training,I've always taken any kind of training I could get,even if it had nothing to do with what I was doing.
     
  12. Armorer

    Armorer Guest

    Rookie,

    First off, you passed RIGHT over Wes's post about what do you want it for.

    VERY freakin' important.

    Firearms are tools, taylored to a use.

    You tell us what yuou want it for. We all can use our years of experience to help you decide what you need.

    Secondly go to your local ranges. Ask, they will answer.

    Traing, training, training.

    After you are trained, practice, practice, practice!
     
  13. Uncle Red

    Uncle Red G&G Newbie

    Rookie, Armorer is right. You are looking for a tool. We may offer some assistance in that if you are looking for a weapon for potential use as a LEO. Most departments view the 9mm and .38 special as the minim power cartridges for LE use. So you may consider yourself limited to 9mm, .38/.357,.357Sig, .40 S&W, 10 mm, .41mag, .44 special/mag, and .45ACP. Many Depts. however are fearful of "too powerful" ctgs as well(for liability reasons such as over penetration etc.), and will not allow 10mm, .41/.44 mag. The rule of thumb(ROT) is: .38/.357 and .44 sp are revolver ctgs; whereas the rest are autoloader ctgs. YES there are exceptions to this rule, but lets make this as easy and painless as possible, ok? Another ROT is that a revolver will need to have a barrel length of around 4" and a semiautomatic BBL will have 3.5" - 5". Some dept. have restrictions such as only a certain cartridge may be used or a particular action type. ie. double action pistol only. That can be addressed later. Now here's the hard part. Your subjective opinion! What handgun feels best to you? This is where you need some "hands on" experience.(Yes. that was a pun) Go to several gun shops(or a gun show) and, fondle, fondle, fondle! Ask questions, have the person behind the counter show you all the bells and whistles on each gun. Word of caution here ... you may find that some gun dealers do not care what you buy, as long as you buy from them and it's their most expensive gun, or highest profit margin. The majority of gun dealers however do want what's best for you. If you run across a dealer that keeps pushing a particular gun or gun maker, then beware. This is where someone acting as a mentor might be of greatest value to you. Someone who has been around the block a time or two who can steer you in the right direction. Another thing to keep in mind is that if you buy, and learn to shoot, a 9mm,(for example) and later hire on with a dept that only allows the use of .40 S&W, it's not that big a deal. When you learn to align your sights and trigger control on a certain pistol/caliber combination, then transitioning from that weapon system to another isn't very difficult. I hope I was helpful. I know that there are a lot of people here willing to help out. Just keep asking those questions, even if you think they might be stupid, that's the only way you'll learn. Regards. -UR.
     
  14. rookie

    rookie G&G Newbie

    yea, i plan on getting a gun to learn on b/c i want to go into law enforcement, i'm not the hunting type. so if i can use it for law enforcement cool, if not that's fine! i ask b/c i probably shouldn't be shooting a desert eagle .50 like bullet tooth tony in SNATCH!!!
     
  15. Uncle Red

    Uncle Red G&G Newbie

    I do wish to add that you might consider joining the NRA or other gun rights group. I do belong to the NRA and receive their magazine, "American Riflemen" as well as "Guns and Ammo." Ether one is full of a lot of good info. -UR.
     
  16. MangesMade

    MangesMade G&G Newbie

    I thought he was going into law inforcement, and wanted a pistol to be familiar. That's why I directed him to the officers in the local he was going to join...Those courses were the best idea yet. After that he'll probably have an idea of what he wants.
     
  17. Shaun

    Shaun G&G Newbie

    Manges thats great advise but most likely he will test with about 30 to 50 agencies before getting hired and that can differ from gun to gun one agency could be glock and the other sig. -- the first thing is to come in with an understanding of firearms before as the shooting portion of the academy is pass fail that means no second trys and the novices usually fail out - in my academy we last 6 of 54 cadets due to poor or no firarms skills. Take some safety courses and get a basic even if its the average P89 Ruger he will have something to learn on
     
  18. MangesMade

    MangesMade G&G Newbie

    I guess I've lived here in this little hick town to long, If someone around here told me he was going to go into Law Enforcement, I would assume it was with our local Force. Oil Well, I really need to get out. That's what my wife tells me all the time.
     
  19. Shaun

    Shaun G&G Newbie

    to give you a little perspective I testted with over 200 agencies alione when I lived in PRK and Only one made an offer - I completed against an average of 300 applicants for a single opening so you could imagine I saw a lot of the same people at all the different tests. Don't feel bad my ex tells me the same thing my weekends consist of range time or being at home working around the house
     
  20. BattleRifleG3

    BattleRifleG3 G&G Evangelist

    My opinion is that the shooter can adapt to the gun better than he can find the perfect one for him. Practicing with a gun that may not be the easiest to use will make you better with it than with an easier one and less practice. I'm of the opinion that 9mm is a little underpowered for general defensive use. Sure, it's easier to use, but it doesn't fit the job, so I'll be getting a .45 and using it till I'm good at it. My opinion is that the army made a big boo-boo when switching from the 1911 .45 to the Beretta 9mm.
    Not to drag out that debate, just to say your favorite gun might not be the best, but if you get handy with it, you'll get the job done better than with the wrong rifle.
    Another example is that I'm not extremely fond of the AK-47. I don't particularly like how it feels. But I shoot one whenever I get the chance, I've stripped them and studied them, and I'll be able to use them if I have to.
    So also, train with a variety of guns, that way you'll learn the skill of adaptation.