I Got the rifle ,Follow up from message below

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Anthony, Sep 6, 2002.

  1. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

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    I did'nt buy , just borrowing . From the #'s I see in the open the # behind the rear sight is 427230 (thought it was 5 digits ,my mistake) and it does say springfield armory. The other # is on the top of the bolt cover(?) its D28287-128A and below that is W9B.
    The stock is new and is BEAUTIFUL the grains match from the upper piece going into the lower piece, no #'s though. Can't see any #'s on barrel,location? there is slight pitting between the front sight and the sling loop on top of the barrel. Bore is good looking . Reciever metal has that gun metal gray look and the barrel and lower tube is kinda flat black looking.
    Any info on those # is appreciated. Will find out more When I take it to the gunshop.

    Thanks Anthony
     
  2. Stock Doc

    Stock Doc G&G Evangelist

    Pull op rod back and tell us what the barrel date and markings are? What is the trigger group and parts marked? Thanks,,Rick B
     

  3. Gyrene

    Gyrene Guest

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    Anthony - Well, you have eliminated the Gas Trap possibility, as the Serial Number shows that the receiver was manufactured after September/October 1941 (I am just guessing that it is about a January 1942 rifle as I don't have the Serial Number lists handy). I believe that you are holding a "Parts Gun".

    The Number D28287-128A is the Part Number of the Bolt (there is no bolt cover on an M1 Garand). I do not have my listing of part numbers and versions related to date, so I don't know if it is the correct one for the receiver (I doubt it, because of the high -128A number). The W9B is the Heat Lot number of a group of bolts that were heat treated at the same time.

    Many of the parts will have part numbers on them, and by now you should have guessed that there are a lot of parts and some have part numbers and some don't.

    The barrel part number and Manufacturer should be visible below the rear handguard where the operating rod opens up when moving to the rear, and the bolt is locked to the rear. If it is not visible, then the part number will be found on top of the barrel under the rear hand guard, or it could be an aftermarket barrel. Pulling off the rear handguard can be tricky and you could end up breaking the wood, so without an "Expert" M1 Garand Armorer, I wouldn't try to take it off. I do it but I have a lot of experience with the M1 Garand.

    Be careful when you pull the bolt to the rear, as it must disappear below the rear of the receiver. If the top of the bolt is still visible when you are looking directly down at the bolt, then it has not locked at the rear, and could move forward at any time, if your fingers or thumb are in the way, You will suffer what is well known as the "M1 Thumb"! It is a very painful experience!
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2002
  4. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

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    Found Barrel number

    Pulled back latch and found the number. HRA D6535448 9-52 RS16 and PM is stamped next to the numbers. I don't care if the numbers are matching I just want it kept close to orignal as possible. Its just I seen M1 throw together w/ so many parts it had 7 differt colors. I just want to make sure this one is good.

    Thanks
    Anthony
     
  5. Stock Doc

    Stock Doc G&G Evangelist

    The key is if it has the base which is a matching barrel and receiver date? They the details come into play like is the gas port pad chromed? Is the muzzle recrowned? If not this is a good start to a retoration if wanted. Naturally he should offer less than being asked.
    You were close Gyrene This serial number puts it around January 1942 and the barrel date can be 3 months earlier to be correct. All I have ever seen so far from the CMP were right on the money for dates to month of receiver. Rick
     
  6. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

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    Found another number

    This # is in front of the safety
    C-46625-1-SA

    The other #'s incase anbody missed them is
    Serial # 427230
    On top , in front of sight D28287-128A W9B
    Barrel HRA D6535448 9-52 RS16 PM

    Also this might be kinda silly , but is there any way that this rifle might have seen combat?

    Thanks Once Again
    Anthony
     
  7. I'd say a pretty good chance, although no way to know for sure.
     
  8. Stock Doc

    Stock Doc G&G Evangelist

    There are chances it made it to combat but you never know. The barrel is correct time frame but not for that SA rifle. I may need that safety as it is for a Gas Trap era rifle. What numbers are ont eh trigger housing and hammer? Is the spring housing,Plunger an d spring int he housing in the White meaning no parkerizing or a silver plantinum look? Rick B
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2002
  9. Gyrene

    Gyrene Guest

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    Anthony - The Receiver is a Springfield Serial # 427230 (roughly January 1942), and the barrel is a September 1952 Harrington and Richardson, (Barrel HRA D6535448 9-52 RS16 PM) so there is no match there. Both the barrel and the receiver are very good ones as long as they are in good condition.

    I understand that you want a good shooting rifle, and one that looks good, too. I believe most of us want that at least. Some of us are picky and look at things that may be of no concern to you.

    I will apologize if I sound a little rough on you when I talk about various parts of the rifle not matching and all, but after you are around some of us and other M1 Garand owners for a while, you will understand the M1 Garand better, and have your own comments to make.

    Sometimes fast talkers will convince you that their deal is the best on the planet, when in reality it may be junk, or something you really don't want to deal with. We are trying to keep you from making a decision that would not be the best for you (I AM NOT SAYING THIS RIFLE IS NOT A GOOD DEAL FOR YOU). With the M1 Garand, it is good to read books on it, to talk with others, and get their input, and if most others are in agreement, then they are probably giving you good information.

    If you do really want an all matching parts rifle, it can be found, and one that looks good too. However if you like the appearance of this particular rifle, and it shoots to your satisfaction, and the price is $700.00 or less, including the ammo, bayonet, sling, &, . . . , then it sounds as though you will be reasonably happy with it and have many hours of pleasure shooting it.
     
  10. Stock Doc

    Stock Doc G&G Evangelist

    I aggree 100% with Gyrene as this rifle is not anything speacial and I myself wouldnt pay more than $500.00 if I wanted it real bad. The reason mostly is I can get one similar for this or less at the CMP. The best move it to get a book on the Garand then buy one. I own many Garand books and all have a bit of information the others may not. They arent going to dry up and a excellent mathcing rifle can be bought for $900.00 so dont jump just yet. Rick B
     
  11. Gyrene

    Gyrene Guest

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    Stock Doc - The reason I was suggesting that he might be happy with a price of $700.00 was that a bayonet, sling and some ammo would be included, and what I remember him saying the amount of ammo (bayonet,8 clips and 500 rds of 30-06)
    included along with the bayonet and sling, would probably cost over $150, to buy. The CMP M1 Garand costs $500.00 plus $19.95 to ship, so if he really likes THAT M1 Garand, it is not too bad a deal.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2002
  12. Stock Doc

    Stock Doc G&G Evangelist

    Yes that is a good deal with all the extra's. I forgot about him mentioning that. Fast weekend and need to slow down and read hehehe. Rick B