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There is a Canadian guy on YouTube that told a story about how as a youth, he was out hunting with a buddy in snowy fields (with the land-owner's permission) miles away from the nearest farm. They spotted a coyote about 200 yards away and he took an off-hand shot with iron sights and was surprised to drop the coyote from that distance. As they got up closer, the coyote certainly looked the part but they noticed tags around it's neck and of course it was someone's dog. He wondered how the dog came to stray so far from home but carried the poor pooch back to his truck and made the rounds to all the nearby farms until he located the owner and made financial reparations.
 

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I grew up on a farm. That is the smell of money!

Same as a pig farm.
I would much rather smell cows and horses than pigs or poultry. Poultry is somewhat tolerable but hogs are just to much for me.
My grandfather used to raise Yorkshire and I hated going down to the pen with him to feed the hogs and clean the stalls. That was the absolute worse. The cows and horse stalls were like walking into a rose garden compared to the pig barn. :sick::sick::sick:
 

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Poultry isn't too bad as long as you clean every day.

I could tell you a horror story about the stench of a pair of commercial size coops which were 4 FEET DEEP in manure, chicken carcasses and broken eggs that the state found out about and forced the owner to clean...in the middle of August in the heat and humidity of central CT. And what is was like living down wind of it without a/c
 

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Poultry isn't too bad as long as you clean every day.

I could tell you a horror story about the stench of a pair of commercial size coops which were 4 FEET DEEP in manure, chicken carcasses and broken eggs that the state found out about and forced the owner to clean...in the middle of August in the heat and humidity of central CT. And what is was like living down wind of it without a/c
Oh I can imagine what it would smell like. My parents moved to Springdale, Arkansas when my father accepted a VP position for Tyson Foods. They bought a house with 10 acres down this nice little country road. Well when they purchased it it was winter time. Come summer time they found out about the chicken farm not that far from where they were living. Now they were not the type of people who would complain to get the place shut down or anything. When the wind would blow just right your eyes would water and the smell was nothing you could get used to. I never lived there and only visited there are few times because I was in college and then the Army.
 

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I would much rather smell cows and horses than pigs or poultry. Poultry is somewhat tolerable but hogs are just to much for me.
My grandfather used to raise Yorkshire and I hated going down to the pen with him to feed the hogs and clean the stalls. That was the absolute worse. The cows and horse stalls were like walking into a rose garden compared to the pig barn. :sick::sick::sick:
You got that right!! But if there was a market for 'cow pies' I would be very rich$$$$$$$$$$ ;)
 

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Poultry isn't too bad as long as you clean every day.

I could tell you a horror story about the stench of a pair of commercial size coops which were 4 FEET DEEP in manure, chicken carcasses and broken eggs that the state found out about and forced the owner to clean...in the middle of August in the heat and humidity of central CT. And what is was like living down wind of it without a/c
Heck, we lived down wind, up wind, and in the middle of the wind. We used to spread chicken litter on our field as fertilizer, and so did all the neighbors. Imagine 1000 square acres surrounding you, covered in chicken house sludge. Now imagine a hot Alabama Spring. Add to that the fact that for the first three weeks of new-growth grass every bovine for miles suffers from the trots, and you are deep in cattle country.

Though, it could have been worse. Sand mountain is covered with cattle farms receiving litter, as well as most of the chicken houses producing it, and Auburn's fertilizer and seed lab is there.
 

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Heck, we lived down wind, up wind, and in the middle of the wind. We used to spread chicken litter on our field as fertilizer, and so did all the neighbors. Imagine 1000 square acres surrounding you, covered in chicken house sludge. Now imagine a hot Alabama Spring. Add to that the fact that for the first three weeks of new-growth grass every bovine for miles suffers from the trots, and you are deep in cattle country.

Though, it could have been worse. Sand mountain is covered with cattle farms receiving litter, as well as most of the chicken houses producing it, and Auburn's fertilizer and seed lab is there.
Where I lived in UT we had orchards below us a few blocks away. The owner's of the orchards would use chicken poop to fertilize the trees. The way the winds would blow during the spring and summer would send that smell straight into our house. My parents would have us shut all of our windows so we didn't have to smell it but we had a swamp cooler on the roof and all that would do is suck the smell into the house and add moisture to it. Yeah good times!!!!
 

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Where I lived in UT we had orchards below us a few blocks away. The owner's of the orchards would use chicken poop to fertilize the trees. The way the winds would blow during the spring and summer would send that smell straight into our house. My parents would have us shut all of our windows so we didn't have to smell it but we had a swamp cooler on the roof and all that would do is suck the smell into the house and add moisture to it. Yeah good times!!!!
In later years they ground the chicken litter up so it could be spread more easily.
I remember when I was a kid, when they just put out the litter raw, there would just be clouds of feathers coming out of the back of the spreader trucks. For two weeks every year my mom refused to use the clothes line. The first week because of the smell, and the second week because the feathers would go airborne once dry.
 

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Around here it's composted, liquefied cow manure. Usually in June or July, either between the 1st and 2nd cut of hay or preparing for corn. Some will spread it after they get their corn in and before they plant a cover crop.

I much prefer the smell of horse manure...
 

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I vividly recall my late teens and early twenties when I worked in the chicken barns. Some of the 3 story barns had the "slats". Slats were grids made of 1 x 1 inch sawn sticks that were nailed to four 2x4s about 12 feet long and were supported about 30 inches off the floor They covered 2 sides, 2/3 of the floor area, for the full 300 feet. The nest boxes rested one end on the slats and hung on a chain towards the center. A track and trolley ran down the middle for an egg cart. The middle had saw dust but under the slats was bare floor - before the birds were put in the barn.
The feeders and waterers ran over the slats And the chickens spent most of their lives over the slats. When there was a hole in the slats a board would be nailed over it. Any chickens that went exploring there were trapped and liquefied in there.
So, feed, poop, dead chickens, and water - accumulating for 12 months - Made the nastiest "porridge" I have had the "misfortune" to experience.
When we cleaned out, and we opened the scuttle holes on the second and third floors. Then we pulled out the slats and center boards. And the porridge oozes down the scuttles. Then we pushed everything down the scuttles to the bottom floor with shovels and Gravely tractors. We had watch for rotten floor boards - I put my leg through more than once.
Once the top 2 floors were cleaned, the Bobcat was used to scoop it all out into dumptrucks, When we got close to the end, the rats had no place else to go, so when we scooped up the manure, the rats jumped out of the pile nd ran everywhere. Even up the boom and into my lap. Dozens of rats in each bucketful squealing, scurrying, and looking for some place to hide, running across my lap. (have I ever mentioned how much I hate rats?)

We didn't have to wait in line for long when we stopped in the store for milk, bread, and cigarettes.
Get home, shower up, put the clothes into a closed can to keep the smell down until they get washed. Boots were left outside. New leather boots would last only 2 months before they rotted too bad to wear, so I bought only cheap ones.
And the smell? Well 5 minutes inside the barn each morning kept you from being able to smell anything for the rest of the day.

So, has everyone already had their supper? I will never forget that. It reminded me that even a bad day in steel fabrication beats working in chicken barns. A few cow patties in a meadow ain't nothin',
 
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