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I want that bullet touching the rifling- is this ok to do

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by tonto, Jun 4, 2002.

  1. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    I am hoping to get more accuracy out of my hunting rifle by extending bullet out farther, please inform if this is an accepted way of getting it there---
    I use a spent casing with the end belled in to hold the bullet intended for the reload, in this case a 140 grain BT nosler in .270 caliber. Then I carefully load it in to let the bullet press into the case, this must be the maximum OAL for my rifle, in this case the entire OAL comes to 3.385" a far cry from the 3.340" recommended and the factory ammo I checked at 3.195". The ammo fits in the magazine and seems to cycle ok, any problems with doing this? Of course it is then custom ammo intended only for that rifle(a new Ruger M77MKII), but will this wring anything more out of my rifle for accuracy??
    Also the nosler has no crimp groove so if i decided to do this with a 130 grain BT hornady with a cannelure(crimp groove) will it be ok to do this as well with that bullet? One more thing and this is gonna open a whole can of worms --crimping??? I figure that factory lee die can sit this reloading session out and if any maybe a slight taper crimp from the bullet seating die but very slight. What are your thoughts on this practice.
     
  2. I start with a spent case and cut a small grove in the neck to allow the bullet to move in and out of the neck. I then place a bullet in the neck and slightly seat it. place the round in the chamber and chamber it twice with out fullly removeing it. I then carefully remove the round and mesure it this will give you your chamber depth and how far your bullet can be seated to just touch the start of the rifleing. I use this in all my reloads. and so far knock on wood have had good luck and better than factory groups, with no jams.
    I only crimp rounds that I plan on takeing into wet conditions. I know this does little for protecting them but it makes me feel better. all my other rounds I do not crimp.( I do crimp all my hand gun rounds though) Hope this helps.
     

  3. I did this a long time ago when I loaded for benchrest: bullet stuck in the chamber when the rangemaster yelled cease fire and I opened the bolt with a live round in the chamber. Spilled powder in the action, had to use a cleaning rod to eject the loose bullet, & had a nice mess. Don't seat the bullets that far out & repeat my mistake. As far as where they give the best accuracy, you just have to experiment & find what your gun seems to want.
     
  4. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    THANKS

    Appreciate the replies, I got a small batch I am testing, next ones I will bring back another 2-3 thousandths, if need be so far nothing sticking, but needed some insite on this.Thanks
     
  5. dave375hh

    dave375hh G&G Newbie Forum Contributor

    586
    1
    Ohio
    tonto,
    If your looking for accuracy, stop crimping bullets in a .270.It's not nessesary no matter what Richard Lee says.
    As to determining max LOA use a dowel or pensil to hold a bullet in the thraot of your rifle then put a cleaning rod with a flat jag on it down the barrel and mark it at the muzzle. Remove the bullet and close the bolt, reinsert the cleaning rod and mark it again at the muzzle. Measure between the two marks will give you the LOA to touch. Reduce this .005" and start experimenting with LOA the determine what your rifle likes best. Caution the closer you get to the rifling the higher your pressure will be if you use the same load across the board.

    Dave375
     
  6. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    yessir

    Now stuff like you guys have took the time to write is what i need.
    The dowel and bullet trick is amazingly simple and i am knocking my noodle on the screen for not thinking of that. Thanks for all input. The range visit went very well except for two bullets i happened to seat a little farther out than i should have the bolt was hard to close. I didn't drimp a one and the accuracy was excellent, now i need to just come up with a standard overall length, and the bullet and dowel trick is also on my list.
    100 yard groups for 3 rounds was one ragged hole dead nuts in the center. I am really thinking of a muzzle brake, and need a adjustable trigger as the 7+ lb. pull is hard to manage. The felt recoil seemed more as well, i guess the pressures must be higher.
    Thanks again, just 5 months for deer season.:nod:
     
  7. Hangfire

    Hangfire G&G Newbie

    not to be an arse Tonto, but if you get 3 shot groups that touch at 100 yds. I would leave the trigger alone. It may be on the heavy side but if it ain't broke why fix it? The muzzle break may screw up accuracy of that load too. Then you have to start all over to match what you had in the first place.
    Then agian....that's part of the fun of reloading. To each his own I reckon.

    hf
     
  8. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    nope I'm getting the same response around here to about messing with a good shooter, but...... That is the best I can do with it, and i do tend to have a few flyers out to the 5 ring , this i believe is due to trigger pull. All flyers tend to be left of target and i am a southpaw. Also the recoil is killing my shoulder, after 25-30 rounds it is nearly unbearable(wish some of the padding in my belly was in my shoulder) without a shoulder pad. It would be a shame to ruin accuracy, but I am betting a trigger job will improve consistency, and a muzzle brake is mainly for range time- so it will probably never happen.I should just invest in a good shoulder pad. So thanks for input
     
  9. dave375hh

    dave375hh G&G Newbie Forum Contributor

    586
    1
    Ohio
    tonto,
    Get yourself a Past mag plus recoil shield to use at the bench. Your testing your rifle and loads not your testoserone. If you did all this other work why wouldn't you fix the d*** trigger? a better trigger isn't going to make the gun shoot worse!

    Dave375
     
  10. tonto

    tonto G&G Newbie

    i meant the muzzle brake probably won't happen, the trigger job is a more obvious choice as it will improve consistency, the recoil i have other options without the cost of a muzzle brake
     
  11. Just my thoughts bud but I really don't think you need a brake on a 270. you will allways feel more of a kick on a bench than you do when in the field. when you see that deer the last thing you will feel is the kick. we have to hunt them with a shotgun or hand gun
    my 12ga kicks like an army mule on the bench but I have yet to remember the kick in the field. my deer hand gun is a 308 kicks fairly well on the bench but feels like a 380 auto while in the field on deer or chucks.
    Try a timmney for a triger they install nicely and are not that much money.
    I have them on two of my mausers and on all my savages(the one for my striker is on back order)
    Good luck with the deer, and get the sholder pad. they work!