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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Found flintlock while going through grandmothers things, would like any information anyone has on it (time period, region, use, condition, value)

158744

158745

hard to read but SHARPE is stamped on plate

158746

attempted to show hole into barrel
158747

can’t tell if it says 1641 or |64| and if that’s a model number or year
158748
158749
158750
158751
158752
 

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That is a pistol produced by the Tower of London. It was a typical side arm carried by British soldiers during the American Revolution. This is a very rare and sought after weapon. These pistols can vary in value, The value can fall into the $1,000 to $4,500 values. You should research your family history. It is possible you had an ancestor who served during the Revolution?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is a pistol produced by the Tower of London. It was a typical side arm carried by British soldiers during the American Revolution. This is a very rare and sought after weapon. These pistols can vary in value, The value can fall into the $1,000 to $4,500 values. You should research your family history. It is possible you had an ancestor who served during the Revolution?
Thank you for the info, unfortunately part of my family history is hard to track because my grandfather was adopted and all records erased except for one letter saying there is a possible relation to a founder of New Jersey.
 

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Thank you for the info, unfortunately part of my family history is hard to track because my grandfather was adopted and all records erased except for one letter saying there is a possible relation to a founder of New Jersey.
We have many Grand Fathers over many Generations. Not all of them served and many may have. Ancestry research is difficult but the results are rewarding. I am a Member of the Sons of the American Revolution.
 

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Perhaps unlikely to be Tower produced without a 'Tower' on the lock and no Crown, and with a commercial smiths name; many large robust pistols are referred to as 'Tower' weapons

Also the hammer does not have the familiar loop formation

This pistol, if made in 1641, was just in time for our Civil War, 1642-1651, I wonder where it's been!

This early, many pistols of this type were used by Cavalry, or Dragoons, and equipped w saddle hooks. I see none on yours.

There was a John Sharp / Sharpe in East Smithfield, London, who was recorded repairing guns for the Board of Ordnance in 1612 and supplying them in 1616, he may have been related to the later William Sharp / Sharpe who was in business 1750 to 1786.


The flintlock was made for so long that it is often hard to establish provenence, especially when they've been repaired for 300 years... can you get a closeup of the stamping on top of the breech; it may be a proof mark which would be nice!
 

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Perhaps unlikely to be Tower produced without a 'Tower' on the lock and no Crown, and with a commercial smiths name; many large robust pistols are referred to as 'Tower' weapons

Also the hammer does not have the familiar loop formation

This pistol, if made in 1641, was just in time for our Civil War, 1642-1651, I wonder where it's been!

This early, many pistols of this type were used by Cavalry, or Dragoons, and equipped w saddle hooks. I see none on yours.

There was a John Sharp / Sharpe in East Smithfield, London, who was recorded repairing guns for the Board of Ordnance in 1612 and supplying them in 1616, he may have been related to the later William Sharp / Sharpe who was in business 1750 to 1786.


The flintlock was made for so long that it is often hard to establish provenence, especially when they've been repaired for 300 years... can you get a closeup of the stamping on top of the breech; it may be a proof mark which would be nice!
Manufacturing then and now was some what more complicated. Many parts were made for and out purchased by the British arms works. Chris 12018, You decide where your firearm originated. It seems you are satisfied with your own answers. :ROFLMAO:
 

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We have many Grand Fathers over many Generations. Not all of them served and many may have. Ancestry research is difficult but the results are rewarding. I am a Member of the Sons of the American Revolution.
Thank you for the info, unfortunately part of my family history is hard to track because my grandfather was adopted and all records erased except for one letter saying there is a possible relation to a founder of New Jersey.
As to your family history, I recommend using 23&ME DNA service . They are not so much involved with family trees as actually exposing ( in a good sense) your blood relatives. Then try Ancestry.com for a tree. It worked for me very well.
 

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I have been a member of Ancestry. Com for years. The DNA is in a constant state of flux. It seems my DNA reflects a different picture each month. Is the DNA procedure accurate ? Is the DNA used for heritage or cash income for the LDS Church which owns Ancestry.Com? :unsure: :ROFLMAO::D
 

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The Sharpe flintlock pistol was typically taken on through private purchase by Royal Navy officers. A rather unheard of practice today was the practice of officers and soldiers purchasing their own weapons, particularly sidearms, but this proved the norm in the 18th and 19th centuries. The Sharpe Model 1760 was one such product obtained by British naval ship captains and officers as a last-line-of-defense (though ahead of the trusty sabre) when attempting boarding endeavors against enemy ships
 
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