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I've been away from hunting and reloading for about 12 years and need to get back into things. Found this site, and so it begins...

What's new in the reloading world? I have a RCBS Rockchucker and need to do some reloading. I need to check out what's going on.

Is Unique still a good all around powder for pistols and IMR 4381 a good all around for rifles? I reload for my 357Mag, 38 Spcl, 260 & 7mmMag.

I never exceed max loads but the funny thing is my new Hornady, Speer & Lee reference books all indicate different max limits for the same powder and bullet weight. Is there a reference book that is considered the definitive reference? I would hope its Hornady.
 

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Master Gunsmith
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7mmg,samuel is a good person to get to know when it somes to reloading, his posts are well thought out before he answers,and his info. is about the best i have found. welcome to the forum. steve
 

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Howdy 7mmag, welcome to the forums. I use the Hornady guide, and it's really consistent. And if you have a question, their tech staff is really helpful. I got away from reloading for a few years, and was amazed at how fast everything changes. You'll get back up to speed in no time.:burnout: Scotty
 

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Welcome to G&G!! Just looking to get into reloading myself so I am not much help, but we got some good folks with excellent knowledge of the subject. So check out the forums and I am sure you can find all you need. Glad you joined the site and hope you enjoy the forums...

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All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing
 

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I don't believe that there is a "definitive" reloading manual on the market but I would trust any of the reputable reloading manuals even though some differ from others, I've read and used the data in at least five diffrent manuals while developing loads for my shootin irons; some preform better than others in a given firearm. Don't forget each firearm is an individual and what works well in my rifle, revolver, pistol may work better or worse in yours. Just follow the recomened loadings and you should be alright.
 

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Welcome to the site 7mmMAG! :)
 

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Since 03-15- 2002
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Welcome. Nice patch on the Avatar. Had to bone up a bit on the 27th. For those who are curious.

The 27th Fighter Squadron is the oldest fighter squadron in the U.S. Air Force. As one of three fighter squadrons of the 1st Fighter Wing, the 27th is tasked to provide air superiority for United States or allied forces by engaging and destroying enemy forces, equipment, defenses or installations for global deployment. The unit wass equipped with the F-15 Eagle, an advanced air-superiority fighter, until it converted to the F-22A Raptor.

Originally organized as the 21st Aero Squadron June 15, 1917, the 27th was redesignated as the 27th Aero Squadron June 23, 1917, and assigned to the 1st Pursuit Group in early 1918. The 27th entered World War I in the European theater where it served with distinction from March 1918 until the Armistice in November of that year. Lieutenant Frank Luke, Jr., known as the "Arizona Balloon Buster," for his daring feats against German observation balloons, was the squadron's most colorful ace. His 18 victories cost him his life, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor. Aircraft flown by the 27th during World War I include the Nieuport 28, Spad XIII and Sopwith F-1 Camel.

In the period between the world wars, the 27th Pursuit Squadron, redesignated Jan. 25, 1923, was stationed primarily at Selfridge Field, Mich., with the 1st Fighter Group. During these years, the unit flew various aircraft, including the Fokker D-7, PW-8, P-12, P-26, P-35, P- 36 and the YP-43.

At the beginning of the United States' involvement in World War II, the 27th Fighter Squadron, redesignated May 15, 1942, briefly served in anti-submarine duty at San Diego Naval Air Station and in air defense duty at Reykjavik, Iceland. From October 1942 until May 1945, the 27th participated in the European and Mediterranean theaters of operation, flying Lockheed P-38 Lightnings. The squadron won three Distinguished Unit Citations in Italy Aug. 25, 1943, and Aug. 30, 1943; and at Ploesti, Romania, May 18, 1944. In April 1992 the 27th FS received the Outstanding Unit Award.

Following World War II, the 27th was stationed at March Field, Calif., flying P-80 Shooting Stars, the United States' first operational jet aircraft. Upon the unit's redesignation as the 27th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, it moved to Griffiss Air Force Base, N.Y., flying the F-86, F-89 and F-94 until receiving the F-102 Delta Dagger in 1957. In October 1959, the 27th was transferred to Loring Air Force Base, Maine, where it assumed an air defense role flying F-106 Delta Darts in the Bangor Air Defense Sector.

The redesignated 27th Tactical Fighter Squadron was assigned to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., July 2, 1971, as part of the reorganized 1st Tactical Fighter Wing. While at MacDill, the 27th trained aircrews in the F-4E Phantom II. In June 1975, the 27th Tactical Fighter Squadron was moved to Langley Air Force Base, Va., becoming the first operational squadron to fly the F-15 Eagle air superiority fighter in 1976. The unit was redesignated the 27th Fighter Squadron Sept.1, 1991.

The 27th TFS deployed in support of Operation Desert Storm as part of the first U.S. Air Force contingent in Saudi Arabia. The squadron was integral in establishing allied air superiority during the operation.

The 27th FS has deployed worldwide to support the 1st FW, flying approximately 25 sorties each day to train in air-to-air combat, aerial gunnery and air defense intercept missions.

Beginning on August 27, 2002 the 27th Fighter Squadron deployed to Turkey in support of Operation Northern Watch.

The F-22A Raptor achieved Initial Operational Capability [IOC] on 15 December 2005. In October 2003 the Air Forces announced that the 27th Fighter Squadron would be the first of three squadrons at Langley Air Force Base to transition to the F/A-22 Raptor which would begin arriving in late 2004. One of the reasons involved in choosing the 27th FS is its being the oldest fighter squadron in the Air Force, and that it was the first unit to fly the P-38 Lightening for the Army Air Force in 1941 as well as the first operational unit to fly the F-15 Eagle. Langley’s 71st FS and 94th FS will also transition to the F/A-22 at later dates. The squadrons are expected to be equipped with 24 aircraft each. The transition was scheduled to be complete by the end of 2007.

The F-22A Raptor achieved Initial Operational Capability [IOC] on 15 December 2005. The 27th Fighter Squadrton converted to the F-22A in mid-January 2006 and flew its first operational sorties with the aircraft over the United States one week later in support of Operation Noble Eagle Jan. 21 and 22.
 
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