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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I don't know if this has been ever brought up on this forum or not but...

What are your thoughts on a lock picking set? Put it in your BOB or in your vehicle.

You may need to get into some place that is locked for shelter and there are no windows to break to do so and or there are but you don't want to draw attention to your location nor do you want to loose heat if it is Winter time.

http://www.lockpicks.com/14piecepickset-mpxs-14.aspx



http://www.lockpicks.com/20piecepickset-mpxs-08.aspx



And even more compact tool set.

http://www.lockpicks.com/pocketknifetypepicksets.aspx

Here is a practice lock you can use to bone up on your skills you already have and or learn from the bottom up.

http://www.lockpicks.com/clearpracticelockspoolpins.aspx
 

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I have had the first set for about 3 years now and they have worked well for me until they started breaking from use. Southord makes good stuff without making it really expensive. The one that I want now is the Snap gun, I have used them in the past and they make life so much simpler when it comes to dropping locks
The 2 main "keys" to picking locks is practice and looking at the whole area and not just the lock. One thing that I have often seen is people will put a $20 pad lock on a wood framed door and a $3 hasp with the screws exposed and ty to call it secure. So alot of time you really don't even have to bother with the lock, you can just unscrew the hasp.


P.S. Picking locks does not make you a criminal, picking lock to gain entrey to a place that you know you are not susposed to be makes you a criminal.
 

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I seldom can get them to work if you give me the keys to the lock.A lock pick would be fun but fruitless for me.
 

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I use different sets including vehicle entry sets which are a lot different than a pick set. But I have a reason for carrying them in my vehicle. Some places will charge you with possessing burglar tools if you get caught with them. Check your local laws.
 

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A handy skill to own and the basics of it are easy to learn with a door handle on your lap and an afternoon free. If you are going to buy a kit then find the pick that works best for you and then buy a quality long lasting version of it to keep forever.

Myself I use a neat lil set that folds up like a jackknife and carries the torsion wrench the same.
 

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Check your local laws and state laws about lock picking sets and devices. Would be nice to have but can cause you some serious headaches if found on your person by a LEO. You may be a good guy, but they wouldnt know that, and you could be arrested or "detained" untill you can prove a valid reason other then, " i lose my keys all the time", as to why you have them.
 

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The last I checked (a looooong time ago), here in Michigan it is against the law to have lock picking tools on your person or in your vechicle unless you're a licenced locksmith. Check your local laws.
 

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Lock pick sets are handy as hell. From my experience, I really only ever used four different pics (snake, rake, and small and large pyramid) about 95% of the time. It does take a lot of practice, but you can get it down pretty well. Make sure you get a set w/ a couple torque bars, they wear out kind of quick from my experience. Some metal clips on the cap of a pen can be pulled out and used as a torque bar in a pinch. Hacksaw blades cut in half and grinded down make cheap, compact and light picks, though you'll easily go through a couple sets before starting to get it down.

Auto jinglers are great too. I've never used them before, but have seen them used in skilled hands, makes it look quick and easy.

One of those pressure air-bags to slide in between a closed car door and pumped up, can give you the room to work with something to grab the lock. And of course a slim jim should be in your kit.

I dont remember the name of the device, but it's used for unlocking doors, where the key is in the handle. You pick it like a normal lock, but inser the spring-powered device, to spin suddenly the opposite direction to unlock the door (to unlock it, you have to torque one way, but to turn the handle to open the door is the otherway, virtually impossible while keeping pressure on a torque bar to keep the tumblers in place.)

And the easiest thing for dead-bolts (about the easiest thing to pick surprisingly) is to make a couple bump-keys. 2-3 well made bump-keys and you can literally unlock a dead-bolt in under 3 seconds.

Hope this helps. I'd definitely get a set +1!
 

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Lock pick sets are handy as hell. From my experience, I really only ever used four different pics (snake, rake, and small and large pyramid) about 95% of the time. It does take a lot of practice, but you can get it down pretty well. Make sure you get a set w/ a couple torque bars, they wear out kind of quick from my experience. Some metal clips on the cap of a pen can be pulled out and used as a torque bar in a pinch. Hacksaw blades cut in half and grinded down make cheap, compact and light picks, though you'll easily go through a couple sets before starting to get it down.

Auto jinglers are great too. I've never used them before, but have seen them used in skilled hands, makes it look quick and easy.

One of those pressure air-bags to slide in between a closed car door and pumped up, can give you the room to work with something to grab the lock. And of course a slim jim should be in your kit.

I dont remember the name of the device, but it's used for unlocking doors, where the key is in the handle. You pick it like a normal lock, but inser the spring-powered device, to spin suddenly the opposite direction to unlock the door (to unlock it, you have to torque one way, but to turn the handle to open the door is the otherway, virtually impossible while keeping pressure on a torque bar to keep the tumblers in place.)

And the easiest thing for dead-bolts (about the easiest thing to pick surprisingly) is to make a couple bump-keys. 2-3 well made bump-keys and you can literally unlock a dead-bolt in under 3 seconds.

Hope this helps. I'd definitely get a set +1!
+1 on everything said so far. I do tend to break the purchased tools, like mentioned above. You can make new ones with a grinding wheel, files, and whatever steel you have around. Allen keys are good stock to make new pics to replace the broken ones. Torsion bars are harder to make believe it or not (for me anyway, ymmv), I have not found a good way to make them that is not time and labor intensive.

Practice is the key, lots of practice. I don't know how practical a set would be in a bob, but it is a neat skill to have at the least.
 

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I don't know how practical a set would be in a bob, but it is a neat skill to have at the least.
You made me re-think the value of having a set. I guess I was thinking more along the lines of the skill and experience (along with the set). So I definitely agree on the quoted line of yours. Lock picking, by nature, is about getting past a lock with 2 goals in mind. Either 1 - being quiet and sneaky. Or 2. Attempting to not damaged whatever is locked, merely re-gain access.

In a SHTF scenario or worse, chances are, making a sound wont be as big of a factor, and damaging a door to get the loot inside isn't a concern. It is a cool skill to have, though you might not ever really need to use it. You can make shims to open combination locks out of a pop can and they work like a charm. Can make a bump-key out of any un-cut house key, and can make picks out of hacksaw blades and other matierals mentioned. If I were you, go ahead and buy the lock pick set, but I might not include in in the BOB. Just take the knowledge with you. The tools are easy enough to come by.
 

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a couple other good metals to make your tools out of would be an old car dip stick or if you city has those big street sweeper trucks look for any of the brush wiskers that have broken off and are just sitting on the side of the road, but the saw blades do make really nice tools as well.
 

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.45 is a lot faster at picking locks
Agreed. But as said in previous post, picking locks is mostly either to be quiet about it, or reduce/avoid damaging whatevers being picked. .45 clearly throws both goals aside. Otherwise, 12ga door breacher ftw.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yeah were trying to stay stealthy here. Using a handgun, shotgun, rifle to blow the lock off is last resort or if your in desperate need to gain entry to get away from someone that is after you.

I believe in PA the tools are leagal to have. But if caught with them doing an illegal offense then your in trouble.
 

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Many good comments have already been made.

As someone who uses these type of tools weekly.
These take a LOT of practice, dexterity, & PATIENCE.
Hollywood makes lock picking look easy.
But in all reality, most locks are getting harder to open.
In a survival situation.
Far easier to use bolt cutters, pry bar,12 GA. or torch.

Modern locked vehicles, are another thing to worry about.
Smart keys, key less entry systems, & airbags.
Along with alarms, and engine disabling systems.
Slim jims and coat hangers, are a thing of the past.
A simple tennis ball will also unlock many vehicles.

If you need to "borrow" a vehicle.
Borrow a mid 80' and older vehicle, with a wing window. (30 sec to open)
 
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