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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the opurtunity to pick up a Turkish 1903 for $100.00 out the door ( $70.00 before tax and $25.00 fee). It has lots of cosmoline on the bolt and reciever and the bore has some rifling left but overall looks good. The bore does not look pitted. The stock looks very dark but does not appear to be beat up. I know nothing about Mausers ( I have the Mosinitis ) but want to get more of a variety of classic arms. The markings I wrote down are a star over a cresent moon, A.S.F.A, ANKARA, 1933 with S/N 4861. I would like to do the bullet in the end of the barrel test but am sure what caliber and neither does the gun store. I am looking for some advice from you Mauser guys before I join your ranks.
 

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im replying only becousei know how it feelsto be pressed for timeandhavefew or knowone answering quickly, i dontrealyknow muchabout mousers however if it passes you inspection for condition then i say get it! its only $100 outthe door so not that huge an investment. after you get it you canfigurethe rest out....the key as i see it is, is it going to make YOU happy.........anyway if nothing else maybe moose or swedesteave or someone will jumpin and yell about me giveing bad advice and while there here give you the real good info, hmm maybe i should tell you to do somthing dangerus! that would getthere atention! only jokeing.....and now i need to go to bed i think im getting sleep deprivation.......
 

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the turkish mauser is 8mm and at a $100 it is a steal as far as i'm concerned,it can be shot as is or used as the base to build a custom rifle.
steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I will pick it up tommorow. The bore has some rifling left but not a whole lot. Of course with all of the cosmoline around the bolt and reciever it might be that comsmoline is covering up some rifling. Thanks for the advice
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well I picked up the Turkish 1903 mauser today and the manager would not do the $100.00 out the door. He did do $120.00 and then sold me 350 rounds of 1942 surplus ammo for $75.00 so I figured it worked out pretty darn good in the end. The ammo looks brand new and is 70 Rounds per 7 pouch bandalier ( I think that is what it is called ). The rifle was covered heads to toe in cosmoline. I took the bolt apart and dropped the magazine well. I got it cleaned enough to shoot tommorrow and probably will do a total disassemble this weekend and heat lamp the cosmoline off of the inside of the stock. The bore looks outstanding with good rifling and is very shiney. In the store the thing looks awful but it looks alot better now and should look alot nicer after I clean up the stock. The stock is pretty dinged up so I may do the Damp towel with hot iron trick to lift some of the nicks.
 

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Turkish Mausers typically have soft steel and will not hold headspace well. Stick to light loads. My rifle builder will not build a rifle on a Turkish action.
 

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The M1903 Turkish Mauser is a modernised version of the German Gewehr 98 rifle. It is a good rifle, with a good reputation. The Turks that give problems are the later M1938 rifles, which were a standard, not a specific rifle model. Many earlier rifles were rebuilt to the M1938 standard - so a variety of action types and barrels are seen.
The Turks used their rifles in a variety of wars - they had a big tussel in the early 1920s, where many M1903s were used. Conditions are all over the map - sounds like you got a fairly good one!
Accuracy can be quite good with the long barrel.

Mine has good metal, but the stock has been Bubba'd. I'm trying to reinlet an M1938 stock now - the action length was different!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I took the Mauser out the other day and it shot 1.5 inch groups at 50 yards about 1 inch high and left. The cleaning rod is threaded at both ends which I have not seen in any pictures. Is it normal for it to be threaded at both ends and where is the best place to get an authentic cleaning kit and sling?
 

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Nice shooting. The cleaning rod is threaded at both ends because you need more than one to go the length of the barrel. The soldiers cleaned on the buddy system.
 

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Generally, the rods were only used in barracks, in conjunction with a separate 'handle' section that was passed around. Few rifles have cleaning rods that reach all the way.
Field cleaning kits almost always use cords or chains as a 'pull-thru'.
 

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I'm been playing with Mausers for a long time and this is the first time I ever heard
the bit about soft steel in Turkish Guns. I dont believe it and on all the other
Mauser sites with guys going back to the war, they never mentioned it either.
Anyway, I have shot about a thousand full power milsurp through mine and no
headspace changes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I am picking up 1050 rounds of turkish Surplus tommorow for $225.00 so I can have a blast all day long at the range.
 

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Up to and including the Turk contract Mauser Model 1903, we know that all of them were made by Mauser in Germany. Only very late Turk Mausers may have been made in Turkey, but that data has never been engraved in stone, since the Turks had so many German Mausers to work with.
The Mauser Model 1903 is indeed a beefed up M98 with a slightly longer bolt, heavier receiver ring, and small threaded barrel. The feeding slot also sticks up, with a sort of hump, where the stripper clips are fed into the receiver and that is easily spotted to differentiate the M1903 from the M98.
No problems with the steel in those rifles. The actions are very strong. As with any milsurp firearms, they must be inspected on an individual basis. Anything that you hold against your head, while causing a controlled explosion to take place inside the device, should be known to be safe, before using.
The M1903 was lumped together with M1893 and later Gewehr Mausers to produce what importers have come to call the M1938. The Turks standardized as much as was possible when they ramped up for WWII, beginning their rebuilding program around 1933. As I said, a number of Mauser models were used and an effort was made to standardize stocks, barrel length and chambering. All were chambered for 8x57mm Mauser, if not already in that chambering. The original Model 1893 Mausers were in 7.65mm and those were rebarreled to 8x57mm.
The only draw back to customizing a Model 1903, is that the threads and lengths are not the standard Mauser that gunsmiths would be used to dealing with.
Steve
 

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when did the turks rebarrel and rework the actions to "modern" 8mm? i hear the earlier actions wont fair too well with after loads as turks liked them hot
 
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