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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello All, thought I'd get more hits in this forum. Just got my dad's/grandfather's 1950 Model 99EG .250-3000 a couple a weeks ago; but didn't measure the twist rate until today. Unfortunately, it's a 1:14, so we're looking at the ability to only stabilize 87 grain loads. I know this to be true because dad would miss plenty of deer at 200+ yards with 100 and 120 grain Remington Core Lokt PSP ammo, and sighting in at 100 yards would be "all over the damn place", as he'd say. Now I know why. I also know why the Winchester 100 grain Super-X Silvertips would stabilize fairly well. They're shorter, and shaped basically like a round nose, plus that semi-radiused silvertip cap was made of lightweight aluminum. Others have told me this was the ONLY 100 grain bullet that they ever got to stabilize at 100 to 200 yards in the Savage .250-3000 with a 1:14 twist. Most likely for the exact reasons I've given. Since Winchester just ceased production of this cartridge (damn!!!), does anyone know of a place that still might have a backstock of a perhaps three or four boxes of these cartridges? If not, has anyone used the 87 grain Hornady SP bullet for whitetails? I've had several emails from Washington state, to Nebraska, Texas, Ohio, Virginia, and Pennsylvania telling me that up to 125-150 yards, they'll do the job just fine with a well-placed vitals shot, since they expand and break up into 6 to 10 pieces, shredding through the vitals area. Trying to find a box of 87 grain loaded ammo for this rifle, even on a well-stocked gunsmith's shelf, is an absolute joke these days, and when grandpa owned it, they probably couldn't keep it in stock because they kept running out. Well, that's what happened after Winchester released the .243, sad... but true. Then, all the manufacturers slowed down production, until we got to where we are today, and that's not good for those of us that don't hand load our own ammo, and can't find what we need when we go shopping for ammo. Any insight you seasoned people can provide on these .250-3000 ammo avenues will be greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
What?? C'mon Guys. . . .

Not to sound ungrateful, but did any of you guys take the time to read my post. It was long for a reason. If you only read the title, you missed everything that was important.

I CAN'T USE 100 GRAIN REMINGTON PSP AMMO, OR HIGHER, BECAUSE I ONLY HAVE A 1:14 TWIST FOR THE BARREL'S RIFLING.

Plus, three of the places some people sent me don't even carry .250 Savage ammo at all! And one place that's labeled the ammo as SP is actually PSP, and he's out of the 87 grain anyway. WTF!

If I wanted to find another dead end or useless site, I could have kept searching on my own. I came here because this site was highly recommended as having some of the best 'go-to' guys on the internet, who would listen to my issue, and point me towards a place that could offer me a proper resolution.

If that wasn't true, please let me know now so I can move along someplace else.

. . Falcon
 

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ouch. Well, you might not be getting a lot of help after that. Yes, your post was long, maybe there is a problem with that. How about, "I need 87 gr. ammo for my Savage 250-3000. Does anyone know who stocks loaded ammo in that bullet weight?"

Now, how about reloading since that's not so common. Midway USA has all the brass, bullets (in your desired weight), dies and everything you'd need to 'roll your own'.

I don't have one of those, so I don't know who might have loaded ammo in 87 gr. Midway sells only 100gr loaded ammo for 250 Savage. You might try that weight for yourself.

Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well, I've returned, with information to share with the G&G community in regards to the Savage99 - .250/3000 rifle with a 1:14" twist barrel.

First of all, I'm not 100% sold on Dallas Reloads, primarily due to Chad's stance on 87 grain bullets only being marginally stable when used in conjunction with 1:14" twist barrels. He therefore recommends going to a lighter grain bullet, like the Sierra 75 grain HP. However, this bullet is NOT approved for medium game hunting, such as whitetail deer. It is classified by nearly all manufacturers as a varmint round.

Secondly, they have a 100 round minimum @$195.00, before shipping costs.

Now for my contributions......

Lance is the third generation owner at:

https://hendershots.net/product/250-savage-extreme-custom-ammo/

He has a highly talented crew working for him in Maryland, including a US Army veteran, a certified Maryland State Police Qualified Handgun Instructor with years of experience in the firearms industry, and a retired Sergeant from the Maryland State Police. He was a firearms instructor for MSP at both the in-service and academy levels for 20 years. 58 years in business located in Maryland.

Also, Dave Gullo is making ammo at:

https://www.buffaloarms.com/250-savage-ammo-250-3000-savage-87-grain-soft-point-spitzer-box-of-20-amo250sav

He's been in business 28 years and runs a reputable company. Can be hard to get a hold of him on the phone due to wearing many hats. Located in Idaho.

The third place I found is:

https://shop.reedsammo.com/product.sc?productId=1838&categoryId=87

A 15 year old business located in Oklahoma City.

All three suppliers have prices for a box of 20 in the very high $30's ($38-$39.95), and none have a minimum to my knowledge. Reeds Ammo offers a discount on 2 boxes and again on 5 boxes.

These places use either the Speer 87gr spitzer, or the Hornady 87gr spitzer.
Now, for those 'in the know', YES, the Hornady .250 87gr #2530 bullet, pack of 100, has been out of production for a bit now. So the places performing these magical manifestations won't be making them with the Hornady spire point forever.

Oh, one more thing, to mauser9 that said, "I would just say screw it and trade for a 243 Win. and eliminate all the Bullsh**"; I say, WOW, you certainly don't seem to have much empathy or feeling towards an item that came from a families lineage.

I did mention this rifle was willed to me by my father, and was originally my grandfathers deer hunting rifle.

I already have a .243, .270, .30/30, a 7mm Remington Magnum, .30-06, .308, and a 52 year old bolt action Mossberg .22, my first rifle.

This concludes my do-gooder contribution follow up for my own thread. Hope it helps someone find .250 87 grain ammo.

. . Falcon
 

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Hello All, thought I'd get more hits in this forum. Just got my dad's/grandfather's 1950 Model 99EG .250-3000 a couple a weeks ago; but didn't measure the twist rate until today. Unfortunately, it's a 1:14, so we're looking at the ability to only stabilize 87 grain loads. I know this to be true because dad would miss plenty of deer at 200+ yards with 100 and 120 grain Remington Core Lokt PSP ammo, and sighting in at 100 yards would be "all over the damn place", as he'd say. Now I know why. I also know why the Winchester 100 grain Super-X Silvertips would stabilize fairly well. They're shorter, and shaped basically like a round nose, plus that semi-radiused silvertip cap was made of lightweight aluminum. Others have told me this was the ONLY 100 grain bullet that they ever got to stabilize at 100 to 200 yards in the Savage .250-3000 with a 1:14 twist. Most likely for the exact reasons I've given. Since Winchester just ceased production of this cartridge (damn!!!), does anyone know of a place that still might have a backstock of a perhaps three or four boxes of these cartridges? If not, has anyone used the 87 grain Hornady SP bullet for whitetails? I've had several emails from Washington state, to Nebraska, Texas, Ohio, Virginia, and Pennsylvania telling me that up to 125-150 yards, they'll do the job just fine with a well-placed vitals shot, since they expand and break up into 6 to 10 pieces, shredding through the vitals area. Trying to find a box of 87 grain loaded ammo for this rifle, even on a well-stocked gunsmith's shelf, is an absolute joke these days, and when grandpa owned it, they probably couldn't keep it in stock because they kept running out. Well, that's what happened after Winchester released the .243, sad... but true. Then, all the manufacturers slowed down production, until we got to where we are today, and that's not good for those of us that don't hand load our own ammo, and can't find what we need when we go shopping for ammo. Any insight you seasoned people can provide on these .250-3000 ammo avenues will be greatly appreciated.
And
 

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I feel your pain brother man.
I used to own a .225 Winchester in My corner of the Arctic.
Locating cartridge cases was tough.
Rolling my own was not pretty.
My reloading skills are close to non-existant.
 
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