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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In addition to that crappy Univeral Carbine I got at the gunshow ( look in the M1 Carbine section ) I also purchased myself an M1 Garand, trying to avoid the dealers with all the $1000 to $1500 merchandise. I found one that the guy was willing to take $700 for and being the best deal I'd seen so far, I took it. I must admit, I was a bit too eager to get an M1 Garand and I wasn't able to give the gun the inspection I really wanted. Most guns brought into the show have their actions tied shut to prevent anyone from loading them. He said it was from the Korean war and it is roughly from that time period. I believe the barrel date is '54 and it has the cut operating rod but the trigger guard is the milled type, odd since I believe most post war models had the stamped type. The gun rattles a bit and the barrel and everything can wiggle a bit when mounted into the stock and the stocks aren't the same color wood, either. It's obviously built from mismatched parts and it does seem the the barrel is pretty much shot out. Basically, what CMP would sell as a rack grade rifle... so I did pay a bit too much.

But, we are talking about the legendary M1 so I'm considering holding onto it and just using it as a project gun. I could probably refinish the stocks to make them match and have a gunsmith check it out for safety reasons because I have had some failures. No jams. But there were two times when I pulled the trigger and it clicked and nothing fired. I had to recock it and fire again. Some say it could be the hammer spring being weak but I'm not so sure. Is it possible for headspace to be worn so much in an old rifle with a shot-out barrel like this... that the round could be sitting too deeply into the chamber for the firing pin to reach it? I've torn down the rifle and cleaned everything and I've yet to fire it again. So... it's something I'm thinking about. It could be a situation like I have with my carbine and simply get rid of it and buy a better one later on. Any suggestions would be great.
 

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Don't give up on the old girl yet. It very well could be what is referred to as a "MixMaster". But, that is part of the beauty of the M1 Garand, a MixMaster can be as good a rifle as one that has all of the correct parts, by number and design, and the correct wood with the correct cartouche. It has a "History" that is the envy of any other military rifle, whether it was in combat or was a "Boot Camp" Prima Donna. An M1 Garand, is an M1 Garand, is an M1 Garand, . . . There are no others like it (the M14 (M1A)) comes close, but close only counts in horseshoes and handgrenades!

By all means, the headspace should be checked and corrected if necessary, and if the rifle does in fact fail to fire on occasion, it should be checked by an M1 Garand Armorer (military gunsmith), and put into proper operating condition if it is not there now!

It is always nice to have one that fits the "Profile", and I have a couple of those, but I also have a couple of the "MixMaster" variety, and they have character that no other rifle can come close to matching (some people call it "Panache")!
`
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
http://img210.imageshack.us/my.php?image=m1garand7or.jpg My rifle with the clips and ammo and the sling I got for $5. I got lot's of clips. 8 or 9, I think. And yes, that's the Korean ammo but it's the PS so it shouldbn't be corrosive. Even if so, I already tore the thing apart and cleaned it throughly after I shot it.

http://img226.imageshack.us/my.php?image=mehgarand21ge.jpg And a little something I made in photoshop with me and the Garand. I love history. :)

But I agree, it does have potential. I didn't really expect a match grade rifle, nor do I need one. It might be nice sooner or later to have a matching numbers rifle from WWII but for now, I've got the M1 and it's mine. The serial number is around 5283xxx and I'm not sure if the '54 dated barrel could be the original or not. It say's Blue Sky, Alrington VA on the side of the barrel. And yes, it's definately a mismatch. Most parts are Springfield Armory but the safety is a Harrington and Richardson. The bolt is a darker bluing whearas the receiver is that sort of green parkerizing. I'm thinking I'll just take it to a gunsmith along with my carbine when I have time and get some insight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't actually have pictures of the Mosin Nagant I fired. It's my friend's but I'm certain it's an M44 carbine. The boyonet flips from the right side and locks over the muzzle, requiring you to mearly pull the peice forward and off the muzzle again to flip it back. The stock is typical with the top forearm peices a bit lighter in color than the rest and heavily laquered in a shiney finish that has chips in it here and there. If I had a better look at it, I'd like to see it's markings and see where it was manufactured. I simply know that it's a potent gun with a big bang for little bucks and I enjoy shooting it. I'd probably buy it off him but I haven't thought to ask. Personally though, I'd always kinda wanted more of the older, full length models like the 91.
 

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THE M1 DOES MY TALKING FOR ME


Awsome pic. But you are going to be talking blanks. Lot of bark but no bite.
(hahaha)
 

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Backwards sling

Looks as if the sling is mounted bass-ackwards on that pic.
Don't feel bad about a "mix-master." Just like a mongrel dog...loyal, stronger, faithful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hm, I think the sling WAS backwards. When I bought it, the guy put the sling on for me and I didn't think much about it. But I've turned it around and now it seems right. Makes more sense that way. Thanks for pointing that out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I just thought of something and I'm not sure if it's true or not. When I shot my Garand it wasn't quite what I expected. To be honest, I expected it to feel very aggressive when actually the recoil felt pretty tame. I've seen others talk about the 30-06 and how it's such a powerful round and how the Garand has such a potent kick, but it honestly was very comfortable to shoot and I'd had no problem shooting every round of ammo I had if the gun was up to it. I did notice the report seemed louder with more bottom than my Enfield. Also, that ping noise isn't very loud compared to the blast when you hear the rifle being fired out in the open.

I was wondering... I feel that my barrel is rather shot out. Could a loose bore make the recoil seem lighter? I mean, you know how the energy wouldn't be transfered as efficiently and such. It's doubtful but I thought I'd throw it out there. I do understand though, that the M1 is a heavier rifle than what I'm used to with the gas-operated action, and I suppose that would account for the recoil being so mild.
 

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I assume that you have looked down the tube with a light at the breech or a white piece of paper with a light shining on it to reflect up the bore...HOW Does the Rifling look ???? Can you see lands and grooves ??? Thats the first thing I look at when buying a gun!:smash:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I did with a white peice of paper, the old fashioned way. There's rifling visable but it does look faint in places. A man who looked at it with me said it looked like it had been shot alot and didn't make much of a deal over it so I take it he wasn't impressed.
 

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There are new barrels available and a Qualified Gunsmith can rebuild it for you if you think its necessary, but you are the one that needs to weigh the options as far as expense goes...If you just want a plinker, then shoot the heck out of it like it is...If you want a competetive shooter with tight groups,
Spend some money on that one if you can't find one in better shape at an affordable price. If you want a MINT Garand, get out your checkbook ! You see, what you do with it determines what you need !
R.:wave:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, I have a Korean War era Garand with a darker stock than the forearms. I don't like the mismatching wood and if I could see that the gun was safe to shoot as it is, I'd simply have the stocks redone to match and keep her around for awhile. The gun has misfired a couple times before and didn't pop the primer and I had to re-cock it. Other than that, not a failure. But I need some lube for it. All I've got is gun oil and I think that big cannon needs something a bit more greasy.

Any thoughts on that? Or um... refinishing stocks? I haven't worked with wood much so I'm not sure how it works with stains and finishes and such. I just know I could manage the project myself if I had the materials and instructions on hand.
 

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If you want to do it yourself, go to the library and I'm sure there are gunsmithing books that will tell you all you need to know about refinishing a stock. If it is cartouched and stamped and you want to keep them then, you have to be careful and take your time, there are also websites about refinishing, cleaning, sanding, staining,etc. Do some homework.Don't discount looking around your neighborhood for a woodworker/hobbyist/retiree that can help you ,guide you, or do it for you !
About that misfiring thing, do you know how to disassemble /reassemble the Garand ??? if you do ,it may just need a major cleaning of the bolt/ firing pin, and components...If not , see a gunsmith ! May need a new pin .
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
One accomplishment I'm pleased with is the fact that I have completely stripped my M1 down to every individual part other than the rear sights, front sights, etc. I cleaned everything but I haven't had it looked at by a gunsmith yet so I'm still working on that. The rear forearm seems to have a thin crack in the wood that's hard to see, apparenty from moving the band that attaches it to the barrel. I'm not sure about how to fix cracks in wood so I'd look into that, too. I don't plan on replacing the stocks. I can't invest all that work. The lips of that band are broke on the right side but it still mounts snuggly to the rifle. I'd have to replace that piece once I fix up the stocks.

In any case. I'm glad just having the rifle to learn my way around the M-1. Being such a part of history, it's a must for any military gun enthusiast to at least be able to handle and fire one.
 

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If its not oily in the crack...I use Acraglass, glass bedding compound from Brownells...put it in the crack with a toothpick and if its in a place I can do it ,I wrap it with strips of Innertube to pull it together and leave it harden for 2 days...it will never again break there ! you can mix sawdust from the stock
into the compound to help match the wood and hide the repair !
BTW, I have a complete library covering firearms and I can give you specs and info for most guns including U.S. Rifles, pistols,shotguns,Machineguns etc. so don't hesitate to ask !!!
Rich
 

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yawn dang im tired, go here http://www.surplusrifle.com/garand/rifledisassembly/index.asp
it will tell you all you need to know. The op-rod spring is usually the culprit for mis ejection, you can buy them from sarco or fulton, remember its not a precesion piece its a battle rifle, not rocket science, its made to operate in the mud. sometimes the the gas cylinder gets loose and the front sight will be sloppy and you just have to peen the slide, other than that its rock hard ww2 gi proof
 
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