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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have removed the disc on the back side of my gas plug converting the M1 into a single shot.

I want to shoot a black bear this fall with 200 grain Nosler Partition handloads and the heavy bullet weight and max powder charge could damage the operating rod with excessive pressure. I worked up to the max load noting zero pressure indications in the gun or brass.

I want to continue using this gun as a single shot for hunting (sporting) purposes using stiff loads in it at times.

Am I missing something? Was it only the operating rod or are there others parts to worry about?

If the photo attached you'll see my M1 in a black fiberglass stock (Ram-line). Wood was good but I love it in black.
 

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You will find thoes who will say that the M1 was designed for the military loading and should not even be used with regular commercial loadings. Your increase in pressures may cause the reciever steel to fail. Better safe than sorry.

DANA
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is there a way to determine the condition of a M1 Garand steel reciever? Mine was manufactured March 1942. Are different manf years of M1's showing weaker steel due to say war production vs. post war production?
 

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You have removed the factors that are sensitive to the timing variations of the different powders. Now you have to deal with the basic strength of the bolt lugs and the receiver itself. Neither of which were designed for pressures greater that that of the USGI M2 Ball. If you are exceeding these pressures the rifle could sustain a disasterous failure.

I can't understand why someone wants to change a perfectly good M1 Garand into something it was never intended to be! Why not just buy a bolt action rifle that is designed to do what you are trying to modify the M1 Garand into? That would be cheaper and you would get what you want. I have seen several M1 Garands that have been modified into straight pull bolt action, and the owner has succeeded in taking an M1 Garand worth somewhere between say $500.00 and $2,500.00, and modifying it into a rifle that nobody else wants and its worth is maybe $150.00, or whatever the salvageable parts are worth.

Suffice it to say, the receivers should be very similar whether they are wartime production or post war. The alloy is the same (within tolerance), and the heat treat is to the exact same standard (within tolerances), which should provide essentially an identical part (within tolerances).

It is possible to determine the mechanical condition of the bolt and receiver of the M1 Garand, however I doubt that you would want to go to that expense (somewhere between $800.00 and $5,000.00). Why not buy a Remington 700, or a Winchester Model 70 that has already been set up the way you want?

`
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I guess Yogi won't be going down with the M1 this fall. The M1 did feel kind of naked without the semiauto function. You talked me back into replacing the gas plug and shooting 150 gr FMJ at the chicken rustlers I come across.
 

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In Ed Clancy's M1 Garand site.
There is a range report on the bolt lug strength.
"test rifle's bolt cracked at lug yet continued to fire a gazillion rounds without failure."
Something like that.
Not saying it is safe. Have no technical knowlege of what presures the bolt lug will take.
There is a wildcat .338 M1 Garand. Googgle it. check n see
FMJ
 

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killer said:
Well I guess Yogi won't be going down with the M1 this fall. The M1 did feel kind of naked without the semiauto function. You talked me back into replacing the gas plug and shooting 150 gr FMJ at the chicken rustlers I come across.
I have used my M1 for DCM/CMP competition but my eyes have peaked. To shoot a bear with it would only be, "sh**s and giggles" since I have taken them with Remington 700's etcetera.
I feel my question has been expertly answered. It is obvious members of this site are knowlegable. I hope to continue to read, comment and learn from you guys. Thanks!!
 

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a quality 150gr hunting bullet will have no issues dispatching a black bear. load some good ammo for it and go hunting.
 

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the m1 is a military rifle--please---its not designed for hunting. listen to gyrene. I love garands, but for hunting use a nice rem 700 or win. This rifle is not designed for game. nor should you use it for this application. It is designed for fmj military application.And thats what is designed for---killing enemies
 

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Well I guess Yogi won't be going down with the M1 this fall. The M1 did feel kind of naked without the semiauto function. You talked me back into replacing the gas plug and shooting 150 gr FMJ at the chicken rustlers I come across.
god you are giving ME A HEART ATTACK the garand is for shooting japs and krauts not chickens it may slam fire with soft point ammo. I sure as heck would not use it for game
 

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the M1 is a fine hunting rifle, fed the proper loads. the rifle does not know if your shooting at a jap, german, or bambi.
 
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