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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(sorry about the double post)

OK.. I love my CZ52... I am curious about the Russian 7.62 Nagant revolver...
everything I find about it says its caliber is 7.62.... is that it? 7.62xwhat?

I guess I am just hoping it uses the 7.62x25 like the CZ52...

Anyone know?
 

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it's the 7.62 nagant caliber not x25. I don't have one so have no experience on how different it is from the tokarev. I only know there is a .32 conversion cylinder available for the nagant.
 

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See my posting in your other thread. This gun uses the rimmed 7.62X38R cartridge, a low-pressure round. NEVER use 7.62X25, even if you find a cylinder bored for it. This gun isn't designed for those pressures!!
 

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Type: Double Action
Chamber: 7.62mm Nagant (7.62X38r)
Weight unloaded: 750 g
Length: 230 mm
Barrel length: 114 mm
Capacity: 7 rounds


This revolver was designed in Belgium by Nagant brothers (Emile and Leon) in the late 1880s - early 1890s, and was adopted by numerous countries, including Sweden and Poland, but the major user and manufacturer was undoubtfully Russia (and later Soviet Union). Russian government adopted Nagant revolver in 1895, and local production began in 1898 (first shipments were from Belgium). It was a standard russian sidearm until 1930, when M1895 Nagant was declared obsolete, but it was widely used and manufactured during World War 2, and manufacture was finally ceased circa 1950.

Later, some sporting revolvers, both in 7.62mm and in .22LR were developed on Nagant platform. Intertestingly enough, the M1895 revolvers still can be seen carried by some security personnel in Russia, especially by Railroad Security and by some armed guards. Usually, those revolvers are 2 to 4 times older than men who carry these guns.

From technical point of view, Nagant revolvers were already almost outdated at the moment of its adoption in 1895, since newest revolvers like S&W Hand Ejectors or Colts with side-opened cylinders were much faster to reload. On the other hand, M1895 had some unusual and interesting features, one of which was gas sealed cylinder, which made the Nagant a rare example of revolver suitable for mounting a silencer. Such a practice was known by NKVD and some Red Army special forces (recon and scouts) during WW2. Special silencer, called "Bramit device" was designed by Mitin brothers and could be mounted on the barrel.

M1895 Nagant was a solid frame, seven shot revolver with non-removable cylinder. The loading and unloading was committed wia the loading gate at the right side of the frame, one cartridge by one. Spent cases were ejected by the ejector rod, which, when not in use, was concealed within the cylinder axis and swung to the side on the ejector rod link to be used. Original guns were double action ones, but Tsarists government ordered that some of M1895 should be retrofitted with Single Action triggers and issued to enlisted men, and DA guns should be issued only to the Officers and Police. In Red (Soviet) army only Double Action Nagants were issued.

The gas sealed cylinder, mentioned above, was made to use all of powder gases to propel the bullet (in most revolvers some gases escape from the gap between the cylinder face and barrel breech). To achieve that, the cylinder moves ahead a bit when hammer is cocked, enclosing a barrel breech area with recess in the front of each chamber. The cartridge, unique to that design, had long case with tapered mouth and a bullet totally enclosed inside the case. When cylinder moves forward, the cartridge case mouth entered the barrel breech and was used as additional seal. This was a complicated mechanism, useful mostly when guns were used with silencer.

Being somewhat complicated and relatively slow to reload, with ammunition of marginal power, Nagants were otherwise good guns, reliable, acurate and quite popular among the troops.
 

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Finnish use: Officially issued only to some home-front units during WW2, unofficially used in large numbers by Finnish soldiers that had captured them.

Russian Armed Forces accepted this revolver designed by Belgian Leon Nagant to their sidearm in 1895. In their use Nagant revolver replaced earlier Smith & Wesson and Galand revolvers. As far as the structure goes - Nagant revolver loaned the idea for gas-seal from earlier design of his rival Henry Pieper. One of the these loaned items was quite special gas-seal system, which was formed by cartridge case, barrel and cylinder which moved forward to close the gas-seal when revolver was cocked. The ammunition used in this was very unusual also: Bullet was seated totally inside cartridge case. First 20,000 revolvers were made in Belgium until Tula factory got its production running. By start of WW1 about 420,000 of these revolvers had been made. During WW1 Nagant revolver was main sidearm in use of Russian Army and over 470,000 Nagant revolvers were manufactured in years 1914 - 1917. Early on Nagant revolver was made in two versions, from these "officer-model" was double-action while single-action-only version was made for other ranks. Nagant revolver (of officer's model, as production of single-action-only version was discontinued soon) manufacturing continued also after 1917 revolution, even if the revolution and Civil War created demand they also decreased production. Even when Soviet military adopted TT-33 pistol in early 1930's the production of Nagant also kept going (with exception of year 1934) until 1945. Over 1,070,000 were manufactured between 1932 - 1945. Also smaller version (often called "NKVD version") was manufactured in small numbers between 1927 - 1932, it had shorter (85-mm long) barrel and smaller grip. The name was quite suitable - the shorter version seems to have been mainly issued to NVKD and OGPU. Another rare earlier special version was equipped with attachment point, which allowed using small axe of Engineer Corps to be used as a stock. Third (also extremely rare) special version was silencer-equipped version (usual revolvers cannot be silenced, but thanks to Nagant's gas-seal system it was an exception). After WW1 Nagant revolvers were also shortly manufactured in Poland.

The Finns captured Nagant revolvers already during Civil War of 1918, but almost all ended up as war souvenirs of those who had been lucky enough to capture one. Finnish Army didn't have much of interest towards these revolvers, as it wanted pistols as side arms. During WW2 Nagant-revolvers were captured by thousands, but only few hundred were handed over to Army weapons administration. Just like in 1918, men who had captured kept them and took them home as war souvenirs after the war. Only some of the home-front units got officially issued with Nagant revolvers during Continuation War, while unofficially large amount of Finnish front-line soldiers were carrying Nagant revolvers as spare weaponry after capturing one. Finnish soldiers usually called the revolver only as "Nagan", "Nagani" or "Nagantti" and the weapon was generally quite well-liked. The somewhat unusual cartridge used in these revolvers also achieved somewhat larger-then-life reputation in some war-stories, even if it was somewhat mediocre or even bit weak in its true ballistics.

Finnish military didn't have much interest towards Nagant after the WW2 either. Year 1951 Finnish Defence Forces had some 1,400 Nagant revolvers, over 1,100 of these were officer-model. Year 1960 remaining Nagant revolvers were sold to Interarmco, which shipped them abroad.
 

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Not a Mosin Nagant revolver, by the way: just Nagant. That was strictly his design, and it was adopted by several countries.

Nagant was a Belgian firearms designer, and Mosin was a Russian (army sergeant, I think). The two of them each put forth a design for a new Russian military rifle about 1890. Supposedly the Russian Army liked Nagant's design but it wasn't politically correct to pick a foreigner over a homeboy, so they combined Nagant's design with Mosin's, creating the Mosin-Nagant. And the Russians themselves always referred to it simply as a 'Mosin' rifle.

Hopefully someone more knowledgable than I am knows which elements came from which designer?
 

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Mosin's action mated to Nagant's magazine design, IIRC.
 

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http://www.interordnance.com/Mercha..._Code=INTERORDNANCE.com&Product_Code=NAGA1000

We have concluded some experiments to determine what other ammunition can be used in the Nagant revolver besides "7.62mm Nagant". Our tests show that these revolvers will work perfectly with caliber ".32 H&R Magnum" jacketed hollow point ammunition as loaded by Federal Cartridge Co. Their item number is C32HRB. The revolver will also fire caliber ".32 Smith & Wesson" and caliber ".32 Smith & Wesson Long" ammunition but we do not recommend it since the use of lead bullets will lead to fouling and cylinder binding. We do not recommend the use of any lead bullet in these three calibers but if jacketed bullets are available, then they should be okay. Caliber ".32 ACP" may work in some revolvers but occasional misfires may be expected.
 

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.32 ACP requires a special cylinder - Gunrunner is the reining exspurt on these little gems . . . :right:

We use the dies from Midway to reform .32-20 brass - works great and is reloadable, unlike the other .32 calibers which will expand and split.
This caliber is a reloader's dream. Cast lead bullets, a light powder charge - the brass will last forever. :cheer:
 
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