MT adventure

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by ruffman, May 16, 2008.

  1. ruffman

    ruffman Guest

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    Probably just another version of an old question... I am a New England hunter who will be venturing west this fall for the first time. I have a MT Elk/Deer tags and am planning to hunt in the middle of prime grizzly country. I am looking for advice on which of my rifles to bring along. Both for taking the game sought as well as anchoring a fiesty griz if one decides on a "Yankee Lunch". I have a Browning 300wsm, Marlin 45-70, and a Rem 338 mag for the chosing. Thoughts on factory ammo as well as I have not begun handloading as of yet. My inclination is Garrett hammerheads out of the guide gun and TSX vital shok from the 300wsm...
    Thoughts?
     
  2. Since you include deer . . .

    . . . . I would take the .30 caliber gun as the .338 mag is a bit much for this game and the .45-70, in my opinion, may not give you the longer range capability if the situation arises.

    As far as encountering a grizzly bear I would recommend (if you can afford it) a bouble barrel rifle in .458 Win Magnum. If you cannot afford a bouble barrel rifle at least get this caliber in a bolt action. Should, and I hope it does not happen, a grizzly charge occurs it will all be about maximum put down power at close range.

    However, this is a forum and I feel certain you will get other opinions
    from those who are just a sincere as I in stating my feelings.

    Whatever you do - good luck and good hunting.
     

  3. A handgun in .454 Casull is recomended for defence against bear attack or a .44 magnum eather should be a double action revolver. A Ruger in either of these two calibers runs a bit less than $1,000.
    IMO the .45/70 will take any animal in the contigious United States.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2008
  4. ruffman

    ruffman Guest

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    Both good thoughts.. Thanks... I actually have a 44 mag in my safe, it is an older Smith and I'm noth sure if it will handle Garrett loads or the like... An option however. My thought is to simplify matters, carry one weapon for all that I might encounter... The 45-70 is logical, but range past 200yds is iffy... The .338 is overkill for deer, I've seen the results. So, with 4 semi auto shots, is a 300 wsm enough gun to stop a griz?
     
  5. AKHunter

    AKHunter G&G Newbie

    I see no reason NOT to take the .338wm. Yes it is more than required for deer but they will be dead all the same, I have killed smaller caribou, 300lbs or so with my .338wm with no undesired effects. It will take elk easily, give you range if needed and, take the fight out of that dreaded grizzly bear that so many fear.

    BTW my handloads for my .338wm are usually 225 grain partitions and they work great.
     
  6. Romey

    Romey G&G Enthusiast

    Being i am a guide in MT ill give you my 2 cents. First of all get in VERY good shape. Second, either the 300 or 338 will do fine, #thirds,It would be whise to not go shooting grizz in our state unless you can prove and i do mean prove you are in threat of attack. Keep your food storage AWAY from camp and high in a tree, down to empty cans and all if you intend on a hnting camp.
     
  7. ruffman

    ruffman Guest

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    Romey.... All good points, esp #3... While I do not plan on a griz encounter, and the chances of a "real threat" vs a bluff charge are on the order of a lightning strike; I'd rather not leave the outcome in the mind of the griz by being undergunned... I'm smart enough to assess my surroundings, leave an area of fresh sign and give the bears evey opportunity to leave or let me leave. However, if I encounter a griz charge with his ears pinned back and eyes locked on, I will deal with him as I best can. Thanks for the input.
    Questions? In you opinion: How might you prove "threat of attack"? And is a 300WSM with 180 gr TSX or NP enough to anchor a charging griz?

    AKhunter... I know from some of your other posts that you are a fan of the .338, and It is most likely the best caliber for the hunt... I'm a little slower with the bolt than the others, which means practice. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2008
  8. Romey

    Romey G&G Enthusiast

    ok, here is the truth of the matter. stop worrying bout the rifle to drop a grizz, you in all likely hood wont be anywhere near a grizz but here it is to make it simple. If you SEE a grizz charge you, its most likely a bluff charge, If your ate then it wasnt. If its a real attack itll happen so fast and hard you wont get a chance to raise your rifle or get a fart out, You wont see it coming and be lucky to make it.
    Take the rifle that suits your hunt and forget about shooting bears. Do yourself a favor get some pepper spray for carrying as bear defense. The 150 foot shot can.
    If your being mauled, do you think your rifle choice will matter when your being drug and flung? And to be honest most ppl wet themselves first time the see a grizz much less one make a bluff charge. In the case of a actual attacking bear being brought down by any of the cal. you mention, taking all things concidered none will. Notice i said Attacking.
    Best advice is dont attract them, dont wig out if you do and dont think even if you did shoot one youd get to keep any part of it.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2008
  9. ruffman

    ruffman Guest

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  10. Romey

    Romey G&G Enthusiast

    I can and will give some tips for making your hunt successful. First off I suggest hiring an outfitter especially on a first time Montana hunt. Most people don’t realize how rugged the country is, not to mention I hear ALOT is. " Where is all he elk, we didn’t see any and we been here for 2 weeks" My response is.
    Did you scout before the hunt? "No"
    Did you contact any local (outfitter or whatever) and ask for or hire their help? "No". It goes on and on.

    I know plenty of local hunters that are excellent in field craft that do scout that know the area and hunt well equipped that don’t take a shot or see anything they found acceptable to shoot. It happens, happens more when one doesn’t know the area or been able to scout.
    At very least I recommend a drop hunt, its a little less expensive then full guided hunt and you do have the help of a outfitter, unfortunately MOST honest outfitters wont do a drop hunt with someone that they haven’t at least hunted once with. At any rate, do all the homework you can. Be in shape, really good shape. Its nothing to walk up deep canyons around mountains, across river break plains and do 10 miles a day in that kind of country, full gear.
    Get gear suited for the task. A good backpack at the least a daypack, good boots, and most of all DONT SKIMP ON OPTICS.

    Poorer quality optics have more to with a usuccesful hunt then anyone thing I know of. I personally carry 9x Nikon binocs and spotting scope, this quality is a minimum IMHO and I have seen them all. I have used lesser brands and yes they work but when it comes to looking in less then ideal light, fog ect, this is where higher quality optics DO make a difference and set themselves apart. Stop and look often and look close. We have predators here and the game knows how to hide a bit better then other areas I have hunted in the world except Africa. I don’t suggest anything larger then 9x for binocs due to parallax when you get to 10 and above they can give you a massive headache and are almost useless holding them by hand and see detail. 7x works great to because they are lighter and still see large amounts of detail IF they are quality.
    I also suggest binocs harness. I wear them on the outside of my jacket so they are always at hand and where I need them, takes little movement to bring them to use and if I need to put a stalk on I can tuck them inside my jacked and zip them up out of the way and close to my body to prevent them knocking around.
    Well there is my optics tip for the day hope you have a succeful and safe hunt be it you fill your tags or not.


    --
    Romey
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2008
  11. ruffman

    ruffman Guest

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    Thanks a lot, that was a great post... I actually had those questions about optics in mind... You've answered all of them. While this is my first trip to MT, the other three in my party have hunted the area in the past. Their last trip in '06, brought two 140 class whitetails and a 4x5 elk.
    We also have two guys in the group who have lived in and hunted the area for the last 15 yrs and have the scouting task at hand. They tend to stand hunt parks and cuts for whitetails, which is not my usual, but can have animals located nonetheless... We also have the area topo's and aerial's for "lay of the land".

    I'll be ready
    Have a great season, and thanks...
     
  12. ruffman

    ruffman Guest

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    Any other thoughts out there???

    If not thanks for those who gave input... I'll post some pics after the hunt...


    Eric
     
  13. take the .338 and you have everything covered. enjoy your hunt and bring us back some picts :)
     
  14. ruffman

    ruffman Guest

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    I'm leaning in the direction of the .338... Thanks and I'll post some pics in Dec.