Gun and Game Forum banner

21 - 40 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
AREagle-76, you haven't said anything about your own experiences with firearms. Do you have any thoughts on what your mother might want to start out with?
If she is recently changing her thoughts - from anti-gun to taking a CC class - my first thought is to wonder if she is just checking out her curiosities, or if she took a sharp right towards a new lifestyle.

But for starters, I would suggest checking out a gun club, and one that has a good number of female members. She would meet lots of great people and possibly learn a new hobby.
My experience with guns started on a piece of private property, some AKs, ARs and Bolt guns. My experience with handguns is pretty limited, but I definitely know I like the feel of a 1911. I now have my own 80 lower built AR from a company in state which helped me out a lot in getting started.

I will say that all the information here seems very useful and after the talks we have had, I am sure my mother is definitely not going to be a gun nut. She does however understand the need to protect oneself is paramount and she wants to do that for herself as well. There is a place she wants to go out and try, it is just a matter of when lol. I am sure it will be soon though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,279 Posts
32 acp. or 380?
the 380 is small but the recoil can be a bit weird feeling to some people.
I can shoot a 45 acp all day long but the 40 just feels wrong to me.[using normal store bought ammo]
the 32's usually have a very manageable smooth recoil impulse kind of like 9mm lite.

your mom needs to be comfortable with having the gun around and on her person.
she also needs to be able to handle the gun, and not be afraid of recoil or it being loud and scary.

get her the largest she can handle.. without going over board.
I know when my in laws got up there in age it was easier for me to make them ammunition they could shoot reasonably well in a gun they were familiar and comfortable with.
but in a configuration that would ''do the job''.
I ended up making their 357 into a
380+P ish type load.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
754 Posts
Everybody has an opinion and many good suggestions here. I have been a CCW instructor starting in 1996, but I carried for 4 law enforcement agencies and myself over 50 years. Here is what I see wrong about some of the comments.
Finding "the gun" that just fits is nuts. I have maybe 50 handguns that all fit me. But there are only a few that I routinely carry and a few that I shoot very well. She needs to fire several, of course she must be able to rack the slide easily, and it needs to be small enough that she will actually carry it.

That said, if a semi, it should be 380. Buy the low recoil ammo if needed but that is the minimum. But even a 22 is better than zero. Second, if there is an external safety option get that one. Only an idiot would tell her not to opt for that, "if" she feels more secure about carrying with a round in the chamber. And it is added protection when the grandkid somehow finds it. Lots of cops have been saved when a bad guy grabbed their gun but did not know how to remove the safety. She can learn to carry with a round in the chamber and simply off the safety when the gun comes out.

Now, most women have guys tell them to buy what feels good in their hand and they buy based on feel. You buy a saddle or boots based on feel. You buy a CCW gun based on how fast and accurately you can put rounds on a target a few feet away. That is not just the grip, nor just the sights, but the actual working of the trigger from the time the finger touches it until the gun fires and how the gun ends up after it is fired and ready for a second round. That is also why she should be taught double taps early on. It the tiny guns shifts in her hand, she may limp wrist the second round or simply have to take a second grip, bad, bad, bad. AND the tiny ones with lasers will do miracles for her learning.

There are lots of instructors out there and the NRA certificate is a minimum. I too say only start with the 22s and then go to the 380. Of course try the J frames, but realistically not many ladys carry a wheel gun to the mall, just to bulky for most. If you can get her into say a model 637 or 642 SW, by all means do so, but most want the smaller 380s that weigh 10 ounces or so. Forget the tiny 9mms, I have several and carry them, but they will be too snappy for her.

My two cents. And most importantly, who she votes for president will definitely affect her rights to carry and rights of self defense. It is binary, you either vote to hurt gun rights or you vote against them, more so now than ever in history. I like to say, it is that idiot Trump or an anti-gun person, all of them have promised to take way all semi autos, all magazines of more than 10 rounds, and to track (1) all guns and (2) all gun owners--forever, So, all the Dem candidates have promise the common sense background check program that will have a gun owner data base that will track all gun owners, retrievable by any cop just like the do not fly list and it stays with you forever, even if you sell all your guns.....that is what it is about. It is not just about background checks it is the permanent tracking of all gun owners...duh?
 
  • Like
Reactions: neophyte

·
The outer edge of civilization
Joined
·
13,923 Posts
My reason for first finding what feels right in the hand is simple. If it doesn't feel like an extension of your hand you're not going to want to carry or shoot it.

My Tokarev fits my hand well, I've shot it enough to be pretty good but it's still not "it" for me. I love it and would never send it down the road. My husband's Glock 22 is so uncomfortable for me to handle that I positively loathe it. But I can shoot it in an emergency. If it disappeared into a black hole I wouldn't be upset in the least.

The Sig P938 I handled fit my hand like the grips were custom made for me. I've handled other makes and models and some were okay, some were nice but none of them felt like it was made just for me.

Women are much more tactilely sensitive than men by and large. I'm worse than most because of the decades I've spent working with fabrics. So unless something fits or feels like it belongs in my hand, I'm not going to be happy or proficient with it. I've gotten rid of scissors, knives and tools simply because they don't feel "right" in my hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,794 Posts
My wife selected her potential pistol based on info about reliability & advise from those that owned one. We went to gun stores within 50 miles every week end & she went on her own during the week. Everyone was saying they were hard to get & when they did get one, they didn't have it very long. At each of the stores, she handled other pistols, but opted to wait.

In my work, I covered a lot of east Texas, from Texarkana down to within an hour or so of Houston & offered to get it for her, but she said no. She knew that she had to see for herself if it was right. When she finally found one in stock, after about 2 months, she bought it. First trip to the range, she out shot me. :p 'Course, I'm no sharp shooter!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,649 Posts
My mom is on the left. She is an avid believer in feminism, "privilege" and loves MSNBC. However, she understands the need for the 2nd amendment. She understands freedom of speech. She understands that the constitution is necessary. I knew her to be against guns until recently, she has become more aware of the necessity of self protection. She took the class for her CC and is now at the point where she wants to try out different firearms to see which one fits her.

She wanted to go to one of the local ranges to test out different firearms with her husband, who is a Marine Corps vet, but he isnt as enthused as I thought he would be.

Anyway, what are some things you noticed about concealed carry and the types of firearms you use? I would love to support my mother and inform her well on what she can do to have a better experience with firearms.
Good for her! I'm pro CC, no matter how you do it. Purse, fanny pack, traditional holster, etc...

CC is a pretty big leap from not owning a firearm though. If you, or your friends, have a variety of pistols I would try to get her out shooting. Then start looking for what she may want.
Hands-on experience is the only way to know with this hobby.

I started carrying an Astra 9mm semi-auto. Then I carried a 1911 in .45 ACP for years. Then I went to a .44 special revolver for a while. Then I went to an officers model 1911 in .45 ACP. A few years back I went back to the Astra. I have a Ruger .380 LCP that I carry when my clothing doesn't allow a larger package.

My wife used to carry a .38 revolver, but recently switched to a S&W .380 EZ.
 
  • Like
Reactions: neophyte

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
34,386 Posts
My reason for first finding what feels right in the hand is simple. If it doesn't feel like an extension of your hand you're not going to want to carry or shoot it.

Women are much more tactilely sensitive than men by and large. I'm worse than most because of the decades I've spent working with fabrics. So unless something fits or feels like it belongs in my hand, I'm not going to be happy or proficient with it. I've gotten rid of scissors, knives and tools simply because they don't feel "right" in my hand.
One of my instructors was fond of saying, "If it feels good to you, it will shoot good for you." My experience has led me to conclude he is correct. I do buy some pistols simply because they are historic, and occasionally for their movie or television connections (like my S&W Model 25 that looks like Harry Callahan's mighty Model 29, but that I can shoot without wrecking my wrist, or my Mossberg 500 which, in addition to being a fine home defense weapon, always puts me in mind of Adam-12), but my shootin' pistols all have to fit my hand or I won't buy them. And once in awhile, you'll find one that turns you into Deadeye Dick, like my S&W Model 10-5 with the custom grips that used to belong to a cop and apparently only fit two people in the world, me and him.

I've told the story about advising the elderly black lady buying her first pistol before. She picked the one that nestled into her hand and purred to her, whose controls she found instinctive and automatic to her. As I keep saying, the pistol doesn't have to be right for your instructor, or for the guy behind the counter selling it to you, or your favorite action star. It has to fit YOU and be right FOR YOU. And when it is, it will perform for you, even if you don't refer to it as "she" or give her a name.

"If it feels good to you, it will shoot good for you."
 

·
Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler
Joined
·
36,357 Posts
When I went looking for a. 38/.357 revolver, I lucked onto a 4" barreled blued Securitysix. It had the most horrendously ugly set of oversized wood grips on it. But, it fit my big oversized hand like it was made for me. The shop guy actually apologized for those ugly grips, so I didn't tell him they were a big reason I bought the gun. Took it home a few days later, then sanded and refinished the grips.
They came out looking pretty good. I shoot pretty good with this revolver. It likes my handloads. Total win-win! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,649 Posts
Personally, I think the hand fitment argument when choosing a pistol is over-rated. As long as it’s not pinching or cutting your hand and the handle isn’t actually round (looking at you Beretta), folks seem to get used to it pretty quick. Everything from an LCP or .25 auto where you have two fingers hanging off the bottom of the grip to a Desert eagle that some folks can’t wrap their hands around. A little time to get used to it is all most folks need.
 

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
34,386 Posts
Personally, I think the hand fitment argument when choosing a pistol is overrated. As long as it’s not pinching or cutting your hand and the handle isn’t actually round (looking at you Beretta), folks seem to get used to it pretty quick. Everything from an LCP or .25 auto where you have two fingers hanging off the bottom of the grip to a Desert eagle that some folks can’t wrap their hands around. A little time to get used to it is all most folks need.
We'll have to agree to disagree, Dutch. You're right that folks can "get used" to almost any handgun. I can shoot everything in my collection well enough to qualify by the standard of shooting to "minute of perp." But there is a big difference between shooting to minute of perp and shooting like Albus Dumbledore using the Elder Wand as an extension of his will. I only have a few that meet that standard.

While the others are fun to shoot, it's those few that I would turn to if I had enough warning that a bad moon's rising and trouble's on the way. As indeed I did last year, when my wife's idiot aunt was involved as a witness to an assault, the perp (who in my opinion is insane) was released on bail, and there was a real possibility he might come looking for her with the idea of silencing her; and also her relatives, including her brother, PWB, and me. Until the trial was over, I kept my S&W Model 10-5, my Yugo Model 57 Tokarev, and my Mossberg 500 ex-police cruiser with the rifle sights loaded with personal defense rounds and close to hand.

As things turned out, I didn't need them, but I was certainly glad I had them. Had it come to that, my Smith, my Tok, and my Mossy would have made quick work of that murderous swine. With them, all I need to do this think where I want the shot to go, and it goes there. And when it hits the fan, a gun that shoots like that is a priceless asset.
 
  • Like
Reactions: big shrek

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,578 Posts
One of my instructors was fond of saying, "If it feels good to you, it will shoot good for you." My experience has led me to conclude he is correct. I do buy some pistols simply because they are historic, and occasionally for their movie or television connections (like my S&W Model 25 that looks like Harry Callahan's mighty Model 29, but that I can shoot without wrecking my wrist, or my Mossberg 500 which, in addition to being a fine home defense weapon, always puts me in mind of Adam-12), but my shootin' pistols all have to fit my hand or I won't buy them. And once in awhile, you'll find one that turns you into Deadeye Dick, like my S&W Model 10-5 with the custom grips that used to belong to a cop and apparently only fit two people in the world, me and him.

I've told the story about advising the elderly black lady buying her first pistol before. She picked the one that nestled into her hand and purred to her, whose controls she found instinctive and automatic to her. As I keep saying, the pistol doesn't have to be right for your instructor, or for the guy behind the counter selling it to you, or your favorite action star. It has to fit YOU and be right FOR YOU. And when it is, it will perform for you, even if you don't refer to it as "she" or give her a name.

"If it feels good to you, it will shoot good for you."
You are correct sir. I carry a Ruger LCP in my pocket yet the most comfortable pistol I shoot on the range is an ARMSCORR 4" 38 special with rubber grips. That and my Heritage rough rider are what I enjoy shooting the most on the range as far as handguns go. The LCP is a carry gun due to the fact that it is the easiest to conceal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,794 Posts
Strictly talking about self defense, we never know the situation we'll find ourselves in. I kinda doubt we'll have the time to strike the perfect pose, or perfect 2 hand grip, or really even take aim. Being able to point & shoot, without looking at the sights & hitting center mass may be the best we can hope for. Hard to do that with a firearm that feels awkward, uncomfortable, etc in your grip. After handling & shooting Glocks, I know there is no way I could do it, or learn to do it with any Glock, regardless of size or caliber.

That is NOT a dig at Glocks or criticism of them. They just do not fit in my hand properly, balance correctly or point naturally. It is just me & I know many find them to fit naturally.
 

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
34,386 Posts
Where I live, the local gun store has a whole shelf in the used pistol rack crammed with assorted models of Glocks that are police trade-ins. Plenty of people buy them, figuring cops maintain their pieces properly and mostly don't shoot them enough to do more than break them in and qualify annually with them. I've tried some of them, and not one feels right in my hand. They just don't fit me, and as they have zero collector value, I have no reason or desire to own a Glock despite their ubiquity and the good prices Scotty has on them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ncnascarlady

·
The outer edge of civilization
Joined
·
13,923 Posts
Hubby is the exact opposite. He's never met a Glock that doesn't fit his huge paws or balance perfectly for him other than the sub compacts. He only shoots it once a year to renew his security license and routinely scores in the upper 90s.

Put my Tok in his paws and his hand swallows the grip, my Tok weighs less than his Glock even though the Tok is all steel, and he's told me it feels awful to hold. We both have our doubts about how well he could shoot it in an emergency because of how it feels to him.

So how a firearm feels in your hands really does matter.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cyrano

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,895 Posts
Hubby is the exact opposite. He's never met a Glock that doesn't fit his huge paws or balance perfectly for him other than the sub compacts. He only shoots it once a year to renew his security license and routinely scores in the upper 90s.

Put my Tok in his paws and his hand swallows the grip, my Tok weighs less than his Glock even though the Tok is all steel, and he's told me it feels awful to hold. We both have our doubts about how well he could shoot it in an emergency because of how it feels to him.

So how a firearm feels in your hands really does matter.
Point him towards an EAA Tanfoglio Witness and he may do what I did and sell off all Glocks for them...their plastic fantastic seems like it forms magically to my huge paws :D

And their 10mm is GLORIOUS!! :D
 
  • Like
Reactions: ncnascarlady
21 - 40 of 40 Posts
Top