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Discussion Starter #1
My gun cabinet just gained a SA M1. Was at a gun show today, sort-of in the market for an M1, M1 carbine, or a Tommy gun (or whatever else caught my eye). Well, I came across a clean (SA) 30-06 Tanker M1 for $650, and the guy would go down to $600. Shopping around alittle bit more, I found a nice CMP SA Garand. Looks like a new barrel, it was pretty clean over-all (the stock had a few dings). Well, I got him down from $675 to $650, and that was the end of that. I finally bought myself an M1. It was one of the cleanest ones at the show, if I may say...

Well, what do I need to know about 'em? I know to stay away from heavier ammo (180 grains), and I should just stick with mil. sup. '06. How do you figure out what year it was made in. I got the box it came in, and the papers from CMP.:D

Well, I did break it in right. We got home and watched Saving Private Ryan. Time to buy a bayonet, slings, and a bunch of "clips".
 

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AR, Just keep checking the Garand Posts. Buy Scott Duff's book. Take it to the range and you'll be amazed how much other people can tell ya about your Garand. Keep asking questions at the shows to the Garand Guy, every show has one.
No heavier than 180s. Commerial round 180s in mine tend to group more consistant.
Find out if your local ranges conduct "John C. Garand" rifle matches. There is a body of knowlegde at those events.
Hows that?
 

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If you want to share some information on this forum, three places to start:

1) Look on the "heel" of receiver - manufacturer and serial number?
2) Pull back the op rod - in the channel exposed should be some letters/numbers - what do they say?
3) Any markings on the stock - look on the left side of the rifle above the trigger guard.

The other sources that Full Metal Jacket suggests, are good, too - I would also recommend Bruce Canfield's book "Collecting the M1 Garand and M1 Carbine" - make sure you get the 1998 ed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
1. Springfield Armory 365XXX
2. SA 6535XXX 3 66 M060 (and there is a "P" and an "M" and then some design stamped in)
3. There is a "P" stamped in the pistol grip, where one's little finger would rest when holding the rifle. There is also a red triangle painted on the bottom side of the pistol grip

Hope that is what your looking for.

Is the Danish 30'06 ammo an Garand clips any good? I flipped through a Shotgun News last night, and you could get something like 624, on 48 round bandoliers, for around $155. Has anyone tried this stuff?
 

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Originally posted by AR-tim
My gun cabinet just gained a SA M1. Was at a gun show today, sort-of in the market for an M1, M1 carbine, or a Tommy gun (or whatever else caught my eye). Well, I came across a clean (SA) 30-06 Tanker M1 for $650, and the guy would go down to $600. Shopping around alittle bit more, I found a nice CMP SA Garand. Looks like a new barrel, it was pretty clean over-all (the stock had a few dings). Well, I got him down from $675 to $650, and that was the end of that. I finally bought myself an M1. It was one of the cleanest ones at the show, if I may say...

Well, what do I need to know about 'em? I know to stay away from heavier ammo (180 grains), and I should just stick with mil. sup. '06. How do you figure out what year it was made in. I got the box it came in, and the papers from CMP.:D

Well, I did break it in right. We got home and watched Saving Private Ryan. Time to buy a bayonet, slings, and a bunch of "clips".

You will probably be happy you did not buy the tanker , many of them give trouble .

Field strip , the trigger guard hinges ( the hole in the rear of the trigger guard if to stick the point of a round of ammo into , if you need more leverage ) , allowing you to remove it .

Coach the barreled receiver out of the stock . Unless things are really dirty or greasy / cosmoline , no point in removing the two handguards .

Remove the gas plug from the gas cylinder . Leave the rest of the gas system on the rifle . Clean the gas cylinder with something like a .45 caliber brush & patches . Get use to using a cleaner for corrosive ammo , if you shoot military surplus , you will run across some . No big deal , all USGI ammo for WWII & probably Korea was corrosive . That is why the gas system is stainless steel .

Either use WWII GI bore cleaner ( not the Vietnam or latter variety ) or one of the commercial copper bore cleaners that smell of ammonia . Clean the gas cylinder and gas plug till they are clean & patches are no longer dirty . Thin I switch to some patches wet with Hoppies , to flush out the ammonia . Then dry patches . No oil , it would burn and leave varnish or other crud . Gas system is left dry .

Pretty much do the same thing with the barrel , in fact , clean it first , then the gas system ( sorry I got things out of order ). Except the barrel gets one final patch , wet with gun oil .

Now clean the receiver , as needed . Now line the notch on the receiver with the little lug on the op-rod , near the " handle " on the op-rod . Most USGI Garands have enough break in ( shots down the tube ) so that if you get these lined up & work the handle , at right angle to the bore , the op-rod will come loose .

Remove the op-rod spring & the small part that connects it to the rest of the mechanism . Remember which way the little " fork " goes . It can be re-assembled upside down & does not work well , that way .

Remove the op-rod from the rifle . The tip if the op rod is a stainless steel " button " . This is the gas piston . If it is not clean , now , go ahead and clean it & leave it dry .

Now , go to the auto parts store & get a pound can or tube of Luberplate ( or brand X ) lithium bases wheel-bearing grease . I have been told that Luberplate sells a grease , in a tube , for the gearbox of out board motors , that is waterproof & great for the Garand .

OK , all the parts of the rifle that are subject to high-speed friction , gets grease .

Where the op rod rubs the under side of the barrel , the recoil spring ( which may need the old grease removed from the spring & cleaned out of its hiding place , inside of the hollow of the op-rod ) .

The groove in the right side of the receiver , where the op rod rides . The bolt & the inside of the receiver where the bolt moves back and forth . Put a drop or two of gun oil on the firing pin and allow it to run inside the bolt .

The under side of the bolt & top of the hammer , where they rub .

I take a Q-Tip and grease the parts in the receiver that are involved in pushing the ammo up for the next round , but oil will probably work there also .

I use the Q-Tip to grease the parts of the trigger assembly that I can get to ( especially the part of the trigger guard that cams into place , pulling the receiver , stock and trigger assembly together ) . I drip oil on the other moving parts and pins , of the trigger assembly , that I can not get to with the grease .

Any other metal gets gun oil . If needed , the wood gets a 50% - 50% mix of Boiled Linseed Oil & turpentine . This requires at least a week between coats . Rub the stuff with your hands till it is " rubbed into " the wood .

Now , you have the rifle cleaned and lubed . Clean it every time you shoot it , before the sun goes down . Use the right bore cleaner & procedure & you never have anything to worry about . Does not matter if the ammo is corrosive .

Only remove the rifle from the wood about once a year . Rest of the time , clean it with the barreled action in the stock . Clean the gas system first , then lay the rifle upside down and then clean the barrel . This helps keep bore cleaner out of the clean , dry gas system .

Get a steel one piece LONG cleaning rod with a bore guide . This helps prevent wearing out the muzzle since the rifle can not be cleaned from the breech , which would be preferable . Many military rifles have severe muzzle wear from GI's using steel cleaning rods from the muzzle . The rods I use have a plastic coating to help prevent that .

Now , are you ready to shoot your rifle ? It is a used rifle & the headspace should be checked . Go to a gunsmith that knows about Garands . Get him to check the headspace . Should charge you $ 25 - 35 . Try to get him to do it while you watch .

Commercial HS gauges have a rim , kind of like the rim of the ammo . to do an accurate job of checking HS with these gauges , the bolt must be stripped of the extractor or ejector . He may first use a go gauge . The bolt should close on it . Next , a no-go gauge . The bolt should not close on it . If it does , he may try a field gauge . It defiantly should not close on it . This means it is not safe to fire .

If it closes on no-go , but not on field , then if you choose to fire it , only use good quality military ammo , the brass is thicker & stronger .

If he does not do this , he may not know what he is doing . An exception is , military gauges do not have the rim & it is not necessary to remove the extractor & ejector from the bolt . Commercial gauges can have the rim ground off to accomplish the same thing .

If you wish , you can order gauges & do this yourself , cheaper . Call Brownells or Midway and order a .30-06 no-go gauge for $ 15 - 25 . You can get one made by Forrester or Clymer . I have heard the Clymer no-go gives you a .001 - .002 " more than Forrester .

I am cheap , I do not buy go gauges . With the bolt stripped and the firing pin removed , I use several varieties of commercial & military ammo , as a go gauge . If the bolt closes on them , with only pressure from your pinky finger , all is good .

When you get your no-go , try the same thing with the stripped bolt & pressure from your pinky finger . Hopefully it will not close . Look at the recess in the right-hand side of the receiver , where the right hand bolt lug fits . Even if it lacks closing by a hair's width , you are OK .

If it does close on a no-go , you can order a field gauge . Repeat the whole process .

If it closes on the field gauge , DO NOT SHOOT IT !

If it closes on a no-go , but does not close on the field , I personally will not shoot it . Some people will recommend it is OK with military ammo only and NO reloads . You pays your money & takes your choices .

If it is a CMP rifle , it is almost always fine .

Order yourself a bunch of clips and ammo and enjoy this piece of history . :)

Wyr
God Bless
 

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Originally posted by AR-tim
My gun cabinet just gained a SA M1. Was at a gun show today, sort-of in the market for an M1, M1 carbine, or a Tommy gun (or whatever else caught my eye). Well, I came across a clean (SA) 30-06 Tanker M1 for $650, and the guy would go down to $600. Shopping around alittle bit more, I found a nice CMP SA Garand. Looks like a new barrel, it was pretty clean over-all (the stock had a few dings). Well, I got him down from $675 to $650, and that was the end of that. I finally bought myself an M1. It was one of the cleanest ones at the show, if I may say...

Well, what do I need to know about 'em? I know to stay away from heavier ammo (180 grains), and I should just stick with mil. sup. '06. How do you figure out what year it was made in. I got the box it came in, and the papers from CMP.:D

Well, I did break it in right. We got home and watched Saving Private Ryan. Time to buy a bayonet, slings, and a bunch of "clips".


If the gas cylinder is loose on the barrel , that will mess up the accuracy , since that is also where the front sight is mounted .

If do , email me or PM me , I have a FAQ that I wrote , from info from Jerry K.'s book , to describe how to tighten this .

Wyr
God Bless
 

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Tim:
Your M1 was made mid 1942. The barrel was made in March 1966.
Your M1 was probally rebuilt in 1966. Look on the right receiver leg for any "hand" marking. It may show the rebuild facility and the date.
Good luck...they are contagious.
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the replies so far guys. A lot of helpful info so far...Any suggestions on what sling or bayonet to get??? Or any suggestions on what ammo to shoot (surplus??)?
 

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A web sling would be OK - especially if you plan to do a lot of shooting. A 10" GI bayonet would look the best, but a shorter M5 would be OK, too.

Ammunition with the specifications of M2 would be correct. The Korean or Danish they're selling nowdays, works just fine. Much of the commercial stuff you get is not designed for the M1 and should be avoided. I use PMC 150 grain woth good results, in addition to the Danish I mentioned.
 
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