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New Krag board!

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Hal Beatty, Mar 15, 2002.

  1. Ok guys, lets get the word out that there's a new Krag Board at gunandgame.com!
    Col. Mook, Marty Wagner, and all the other refugees from that other defunct board; Are you out there?
    Regards,
    Hal Beatty
     
  2. Krag fourm?

    have these rifles become populer over night?? why give them a fourm, there inst a Carcano fourm, and there's alot more people collecting them then Krag's, no offense, this is just my opinion.
     

  3. BOB487

    BOB487 G&G Newbie

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    WHY HAVE A FORUM FOR KRAG S

    Realll good to see this site up and running The Krag is a milestone in US miliotary history and although a short life in the field it served as that bridge from the 45-70 to the 03 . Its history guys We are are not here today without what has come before. The subbtle varieties in the Krag plus the many accoutremnets makes for interesting collecting
     
  4. Jesse

    Jesse G&G Newbie Forum Contributor

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    Krag

    Krag Rifles are former military rifles and the US used plenty of them until the approval of the 03/A3. I decided to draw the line on Military US firearms (including in forums) those that served the US armed forces in the 20th century. The rest would really fall under antiques which I'm considering adding as a forum later. Besides, the Krag has a dedicated following this site will embrace as well as all military firearms.


    Jesse:)
     
  5. Krag's

    ok, I understand ;)
     
  6. Tony @ WCG

    Tony @ WCG G&G Newbie

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    Krags are more popular then most people would realize and I think they have went thru a resurgence in recent years. Jesse told me this was a last minute addition to the forum list and I am sure it is a very welcome one too.
     
  7. Jesse

    Jesse G&G Newbie Forum Contributor

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    Hi...

    Hi Tony...
     
  8. Gyrene

    Gyrene G&G Newbie

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    Jesse - Thanks for the Krag Forum. The rifle was used by a lot of National Guard units even into the early 1930's, so it was a much used rifle at the tail end of the 19th Century (1898 & on) as well as being a 20th Century USGI firearm.

    Despite its .30-30 likeness on its hitting power, it was used very effectively when the closing range was 300 yards or less.

    I have 2 of them and I do like them for what they are. Unfortunately someone did a slight butcher job on one of them, taking about 8 inches of the stock off the muzzle end (fortunately the metal parts were retained and just moved closer to the receiver). At our Monthly CMP rifle match last Saturday, a sporterized .30-40 Krag was used, and he fired over 300. I watched the rapid fire, and he had no difficulty completing the 10 shots in both the Sitting and Prone positions, within the time limit.
     
  9. Krags can be surprisingly accurate, if the bore's in decent condition and the right bullets are used. My uncut '98 rifle built in 1902 can keep the groups under an inch if I do my part. Unfortunately these old eyes don't do so well with that tiny peep on the 1901 rear sight any more. Still a lot of fun to shoot and just about the slickest action ever designed.
    Regards,
    Hal Beatty
     
  10. lefty o

    lefty o G&G Evangelist

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    kinda wanted to add a krag to my collection for a few years now, but ive never seen one that hasnt been butchered- do these things exist in an unmolested state?
     
  11. Gyrene

    Gyrene G&G Newbie

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    lefty o - I was beginning to think I would never find an ummolested .30-40 Krag, and that is why I bought the slightly molested one. Suddenly one popped up and I grabbed it (too expensive) but it was unmolested.

    I never thought I would have a chance to get an unmolested .45-70 Trap Door Springfield either. Suddenly from the same source as the .30-40 Krag, it was available, as was a .50-70 Allin Trap Door Conversion Springfield. The problem with the .50-70 is the cost of br**** and loaded cartridges with shipping and all would cost $5.00 per shot.

    Can you believe that the word "brass" was censored? I was just talking about cartridge cases, WOW!!! Whats up Jesse???
     
  12. maybe

    maybe it thought you said "A$$"??? it's like that on the 3 wheller world.
     
  13. lefty o

    lefty o G&G Evangelist

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    well kiss my br**** i guess this new fangled software aint so smart if it cant tell the difference between br**** and -well you know! :p
     
  14. Unmolested Krags ARE still out there, but tend to be a little pricey, $500-800 for one in decent condition in this neck of the woods. Though there are always exceptions to the rule: a friend of a friend picked up a '98 rifle in VG-Excellent condition in a local sporting goods store for $200, just happened to be in the right place at the right time.
    Real Carbines go for more money, note that I said "Real" carbines as there are far more Krag carbines out there now than were ever built by Springfield.
    So Gyrene, did you buy the Allin Conversion? I've been sorely tempted by a co-workers Allin for the last couple of years, but $1200 is just a little more than I want to spend. But if I were really into black powder.........

    Regards,
    Hal Beatty
     
  15. Gyrene

    Gyrene G&G Newbie

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    Hal Beatty - OH YES, I bought both of them. The .50-70 Allin Trap Door Springfield Conversion cost me $700.00. That was quite a lot less than the asking price, but then he is a friend of mine. It is an 1863 Springfield muzzle loader (Civil War era), that was modified with the Allin Conversion in 1870. It is very much like many if not most of the rifles carried by Custers 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

    I have seen about 20 or so Krag Carbines and no more than 3 or 4 of them were "Real".

    The .45-70 (load to .45-50 w/405 grain bullet)Trap Door Springfield Carbines are rare and quite pricy, too! I saw one Sunday which had been owned by the current owner's father, and before him the grandfather. NAW, he wouldn't even consider selling it, but he said I can shoot it anytime I want.
     
  16. You bought both of them? I'm jealous! The more I keep thinking about it the more I feel like making my buddy an offer he can't refuse for his Allin conversion. This one is dated 1865 and is in fine condition with an excellent bore, which is remarkable for a black powder gun built that long ago. Must not have seen much use.
    Hey, how'd we get off the Krag topic?!
    Regards,
    Hal Beatty
     
  17. Gyrene

    Gyrene G&G Newbie

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    Hal Beatty - Yeah, I couldn't help myself,I get greedy sometimes especially if I have a couple of dollars in my pocket that I can't remember what bills I intended to pay with them.

    Keep in mind, ya gotta get any cases he has, cause last time I looked it was $47.95 for 20 cases, and about $84.95 plus shipping for 20 loaded cartridges. Close to $5.00 per shot, so I don't think I'll shoot it very much. But, nobody said shooting a .50 Cal is supposed to be cheap!
     
  18. Yeah, but ya gotta pay to play. Have fun!
     
  19. Gyrene

    Gyrene G&G Newbie

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    Hal Beatty - I guess that it was just natural progression that took me to say something about the Trap Doors, maybe there should have been a Forum for them, too!

    They are the immediate predecessor to the .30-40 Krag Jorgensen, so it seemed appropriate to bring them into the discussion.

    Right now I have the delimma (sp) of deciding which of the latest offering from the CMP of '03's or '03-A3's to buy. I already have a full set, but the ones offered may be in better condition. The '03 is the immediate follow on U. S. Rifle to the .30-40 Krag, so I felt a little justified in mentioning them, too.
     
  20. Yeah, the Trapdoor, Krag and Springfield are just representative of the progression from large bore, single shot black powder to a "modern" small bore bolt action smokeless powder battle rifle. Just a part of history!
    Regards,
    Hal Beatty