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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
im wanting to get started reloading but dont know much about it. i kind of know the basics but other than that im not sure. i think that i want a progressive reloader. we hav a 270, 223, 243 , 22-250, and a 308 that we would want to reload. any help would be appreciated
 

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I would start off with a single stage press if you are new to reloading.I would invest the savings in getting proper tools for case preping, gauges etc.a good powder scale etc.
 

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If you can get a deal on a progressive press there is absolutely no difference except the progressive makes rhings simpler.You set each stage up individually and you dont have to tear one down to use the other stage,say from sizing to seating or crimping.It takes more jacking around to run a single stage,the only thing is they are cheaper.But not by much. sam.
 

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Good advice! Start with a single stage KIT. Buy some manuals and books and read, read, read! Then go buy primers, powder, and bullets and start enjoying a hobby that will last a lifetime!
 

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I dont know why people think a progressive press is just too much for a beginner.Basically they are just three or more single stages in one easy to set up package.Often either from an individual or at a gun show you can get a teal good deal on a progressive and they are absolutely the same to set up as a single and you dont have to tear one die out to use another.I believe they are made for beginners. sam.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yeah that is why i thought a progressive would be better. its faster adn dosent take as much down time changing stuff
 

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I dont think its too much, I just thought from the calibers listed, a single stage was sufficient. If he had listed 2 or 3 pistol calibers, I would of suggested the progressive to crank out some rounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well there are 4 of us guys that r going to go in together to buy it and we each have at least two rifles we would want to reload for. so i thought a progressive would be better becasuse its alot faster. whats a good manual to buy?
 

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i own one of the best progressive presses on the market, a dillon 650XL. i will say, it is not the best idea for a person that has never loaded ammunition before to try and load ammo on it- there is way too much going on at 1 time. one screw up can cost you your gun, or worse. get some manuals, and read them throughly before purchasing a press, at least then you'll be somewhat informed. for a newbie, i'd pick up the lymann manual, and the hornady manual. if in the end you just have to buy a progressive, consider the dillon 550RB.
 

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I'm with Lefty on this one as I think a true progressive is just a bit too "busy" for someone just learning what the process is. A single stage teaches you exactly what happens at every stage of the reloading process rather than having every single stage happening at the same time. If you are set on having a progressive, try to find one that allows the user to disable the progressive feature and operate the press as a single stage or turret until you have a good handle on what to watch for. A double or light charge can hurt or kill you at the extreme or, at the very least, cause you some major headaches. The best advice is to study a lot, ask a lot of questions, and study some more. It's a lot like shooting, it's not hard, but carelessness\ignorance can have disastrous consequences.
 

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Hey Leroy,
Take a look at the Lee Classic four station auto turret press for under ninety bucks. All you do is add the primer, case and bullet, with four pulls the cartridge is done,it's simple with no jams . One shell holder will fit all your rifle calibers except the 223. I use the Lee powder thru dies which come with the shell holder. You can get extra turret heads. I have a Hornady powder measure mounted just to the left of the press. Most of the time, I rotate the head manually by removing the center index rod. Lee provides a free demonstration on their net. This is a strong press as needed for the large bottleneck cases. Good luck!
 

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The part that worries me now is having too many cooks spoiling the soup.I wont allow anyone to mess with any of my reloading conglomeration.I would rather have everything under my control.I have people ask but there is no way I even want someone touching my reloading equipment. sam.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
well i would be the one doing all the reloading i would be doing it for everyone. they dont want to mess with doing the work but like the idea of getting reloads
 

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Just my opinion but for a beginner I think you should focus on single stage press, If at some point you think your ready for a progressive press, then by all means get one!But accidents do happen and you wouldn't want to damage your self or your rifle due to a mistake? To the best of my knowledge firearms manufacturers wont honor their warranty if they suspect you were shooting reloads.So just remember your on your own if your rifle/pistol/shotgun is damaged!

leroy you brothers might have the best intentions but humans make mistakes! when you know your going to be the brunt of what happens you tend to pay attention to detail.
 

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Leroy, First thing you should do is get the book Begining Reloading and read through it. Also buy more than one reloading manual. Then you will know what do do with your equipment, when you get it. You will find reloading fun and a learning hobby you are always learning something new. Ps. buy a case lengh gage you can get one that works for all your cal. and check to see that your shells are not to long if they are they must be filed or turned down(on a case lengh trimmer) to proper specs. If you were from Minn. I would tell you to sit in with us some time.
 

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Leroy, I started out with a Herters reloading kit in 1973. I also bought a Speer reloading manual, and a friend of mine walked me through the steps the first time. I still have made mistakes over the years. Nothing too serious, but they will happen. Get a manual and read. When you reload, be focused and don't allow others in the area. You really don't want distractions. You will work up your own system of doing things and you should stick to it. Do everything the same every time you do it. Have fun!!!
 

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Leroy I started handloading shot gun shells with a lee hand loader when i was 14 years old and eventualy worked my way up to rifle and pistol as I got older,I was lucky in the scense that my father and his shooting buddies were there to show me how to do it and shoved a bunch of books under my nose to learn from. most of the guys in here are giving you sound advise.keep it simple learn each stage,take your time and be consistant, examine your cartridges/primers before and after you shot.refernce your books to see how reloading affects the primer if any damage to the cartridge.when loading start with the min.load and work your way up stay with in the guide lines of what the reloading books say.I don't mean to scare you reloading is rather safe but you have to pay attention to details,just starting out your not aware of all the details. I've been loading now for almost 40 years and i'm still learning.right now i'm focused on working up a good load for my M1A and remington bolt 308.It's a fun hobby just pay attention and as one of the other respondants stated read read read read !!!!!!!!!
 
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