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Yo Ho Ho And A Bottle Of Rum
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Discussion Starter #1
Finally got up in the attic to see what it looked like. And to see how the wiring ran and what I would need to do to rearrange electric wire to run down for a couple new outlets.
I have never gotten up in the attic. There was a covered up entry that had a 2x4 nailed across the opening. Once I got the 2x4 out of the way I could shinny my fat but up there.

Well I found out about all the wires I need to move. And looked at how I could add a couple boxes and run wire through to splice wires together. And what I would have to do to put some plywood up there to store stuff.

Like I said. No Toys In The Attic.
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Well no surprises. Be nice to find a few relic guns or a few bottles shine. Do you have any spare breakers for the electric panel? I would make sure you are not overloading any circuits. Also lighting circuits should be used just for lights. What are you adding Mark?
 

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The photos put me in mind of my flooring in the New Attic over the living room, dining room, and kitchen. It is actually the attic over the original cabin the house started as. Access is through a hatch in the wall in the upstairs hall, and I had to build a ladder specifically for accessing it.

Use 3/4 inch plywood. Start out by ripping two sheets on the long axis so you can get them up there and give yourself a working surface. Get up there and move the half-sheets around so you can take measurements without worrying about putting a leg through the ceiling. Then do all the cutting out in the yard so you can butt the ends together and end up with enough room to nail or screw two sheets into one joist. If necessary, you may have to screw a 2x3 onto one side of the joists to give you enough surface to screw the plywood down.

You have the choice of starting near the hatch and working towards the far end, or using the loose half sheets to make a path to the far end and work your way back to the hatch, which is what I recommend. I also suggest that you get yourself knee and elbow pads, because crawling around in tight spaces hurts a lot.

I found I could only stand working up there for about 90 minutes at a time because my back and joints would not stand for more than that. Be sure to leave access ports for any power boxes, and paint the ports so you know what's under them.

If you can, I suggest wiring in a 2 plug outlet, plugging in a power strip you screw to a vertical, and install a couple of the LED garage/workbench lights in the roof joists so you can see what you are doing. (Wiring the lights in to work off a switch is beyond my skill level.)

You will get a lot of storage space out of it. And you will be amazed how fast it fills up!
 

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Looking at the insulation, it looks like cellulose from the view in the picture? It also looks low like it needs to be topped off . It should be full to at least the top of the ceiling joists and maybe a inch or two above them. It will keep you cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter saving money in the end. Most the home depot, lowes stores have a blow in machine you can borrow when you purchase the insulation. one guy fills the machine while the guy upstairs blows the stuff in place . Wear a respirator. Don't fill the void near the eve's . Usually the soffit ' s are vented that should be left to vent to either a gable vent or ridge vent or both. Looks like there is a gable vent in the picture.
 

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My Grandfather was my hero. He said as a lad he accidently shot and killed his dads best Cayuse.
The Old rifle was in the attic of the old settler's house. Many years past, I never forgot the rifle. My brother came up from Oklahoma we searched the old house for hours. Never found a rifle. :(
 

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Jim, you sent me looking for Cayuse! My daughter is a horse person...
 
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Yo Ho Ho And A Bottle Of Rum
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Discussion Starter #15
Looking at the insulation, it looks like cellulose from the view in the picture? It also looks low like it needs to be topped off . It should be full to at least the top of the ceiling joists and maybe a inch or two above them. It will keep you cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter saving money in the end. Most the home depot, lowes stores have a blow in machine you can borrow when you purchase the insulation. one guy fills the machine while the guy upstairs blows the stuff in place . Wear a respirator. Don't fill the void near the eve's . Usually the soffit ' s are vented that should be left to vent to either a gable vent or ridge vent or both. Looks like there is a gable vent in the picture.
Yeah it needs to be topped off. But that will be after I get everything into place. And yep I know about keeping a space clear where the soffits are.
Not much of a gable vent. There is a place there for a vent. but the outside is covered with vinyl siding.
 

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Yo Ho Ho And A Bottle Of Rum
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Discussion Starter #17
Nope, but plenty of "Pink" insulation, who woulda thunk it? :rolleyes: ..
Boy you are color blind:D The stuff up there is grey and dusty. I was moving some of it around looking for a hole I put dead center of the living room ceiling. Dust was all over the place.
No electric box in center of living room ceiling. So going to add one and put in a ceiling fan.
 

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Yo Ho Ho And A Bottle Of Rum
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Discussion Starter #18
The photos put me in mind of my flooring in the New Attic over the living room, dining room, and kitchen. It is actually the attic over the original cabin the house started as. Access is through a hatch in the wall in the upstairs hall, and I had to build a ladder specifically for accessing it.

Use 3/4 inch plywood. Start out by ripping two sheets on the long axis so you can get them up there and give yourself a working surface. Get up there and move the half-sheets around so you can take measurements without worrying about putting a leg through the ceiling. Then do all the cutting out in the yard so you can butt the ends together and end up with enough room to nail or screw two sheets into one joist. If necessary, you may have to screw a 2x3 onto one side of the joists to give you enough surface to screw the plywood down.

You have the choice of starting near the hatch and working towards the far end, or using the loose half sheets to make a path to the far end and work your way back to the hatch, which is what I recommend. I also suggest that you get yourself knee and elbow pads, because crawling around in tight spaces hurts a lot.

I found I could only stand working up there for about 90 minutes at a time because my back and joints would not stand for more than that. Be sure to leave access ports for any power boxes, and paint the ports so you know what's under them.

If you can, I suggest wiring in a 2 plug outlet, plugging in a power strip you screw to a vertical, and install a couple of the LED garage/workbench lights in the roof joists so you can see what you are doing. (Wiring the lights in to work off a switch is beyond my skill level.)

You will get a lot of storage space out of it. And you will be amazed how fast it fills up!
I have only taken one piece of ply up there. I had to cut it down to only 22 inches wide to fit through the hole in the ceiling. I just put that one piece up there to move around so I could balance on the rafters, and slide the ply in place to lay down on the ply while I'm rearranging the wires.
 
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