Gun and Game Forum banner
61 - 78 of 78 Posts

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
36,051 Posts
I didn't know Israelis resorted to that.
The Israelis don't talk about it much, but Stanley P. Lovell, Deputy Director of Research and Development for the OSS during World War II, reported on it in his biography of the organization, Of Spies and Stratagems.

He also, in the only place I have ever seen it, reported on the Navy's plan to bombard Iwo Jima with poison gas shells a day before launching Operation Detachment, the invasion of the island. The plan got as far as the shells being built, being approved by the planning staff, approved by the Chief of Naval Operations, before it was presented for final approval by Franklin Delano Roosevelt. FDR's response was to write on the title sheet, "REQUEST DENIED - FDR" in big, red letters. Even though the Japanese did not have good anti-gas protection for their troops, even though neither the United States nor Japan had signed the anti-gas convention that is part of the Geneva Protocols and therefore could use poison gas legally, even though it was clear by February of 1945 that the Japanese would fight to the last man, Roosevelt was unwilling to employ a weapon that had been greeted with repugnance by world opinion when the Germans used it in World War I. Lovell could see FDR's point, but he also considered the 6100 dead Marines and wondered if not using poison gas was the right decision.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,281 Posts
with the Japs holding the high ground and being dug in deep enough that naval bombardments didn't hardly scuff the surface, i seriously doubt gas would have been much help.
it would have just settled in down in the valleys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,656 Posts
I shot my brother's sheep in the head with a .22lr, missed the brain but got it right on the 6th shot. It left me thinking that a .357mag would have worked better.
I've shared this before, but we had a cow get attacked by a pack of the neighbor's hounds and the coydogs they had befriended (sired?). My dad emptied a Glock 33 mag of .357 Sig into her brain at point blank range to put her out of her misery, and only compounded that misery. My 45 Colt with light loads did her in with one shot. You never really know what will work.
 

·
Global Warming Enthusiast
Joined
·
4,283 Posts
I used to watch the butcher at my uncle's farm in Puyalluip, WA put cows down with a .22 short. It was like he sliced it's legs off, straight to the ground. Not recommended for anyone less skilled than him I am sure.

Cows are what I hunt in that situation. No doubt.
I mean that's the easy meat right? :D But think about getting it home, it's not something you and a buddy can heave into the back of your pickup real easy. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,831 Posts
I used to watch the butcher at my uncle's farm in Puyalluip, WA put cows down with a .22 short. It was like he sliced it's legs off, straight to the ground. Not recommended for anyone less skilled than him I am sure.



I mean that's the easy meat right? :D But think about getting it home, it's not something you and a buddy can heave into the back of your pickup real easy. ;)
That is why they make winches, come-a-longs and flatbeds brother.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,281 Posts
those ain't so easy to operate when a pissed off farmer is emptying his 0-6 in your direction.
i don't know about where you guys live but the ranchers and farmers here are dicks, most of them will shoot at you now even if there ain't no sign.
going post civil war wild west SHTF,, the rules will revert back to whomever has the most firepower ATM makes the rules.
 
  • Like
Reactions: neophyte

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
I've shared this before, but we had a cow get attacked by a pack of the neighbor's hounds and the coydogs they had befriended (sired?). My dad emptied a Glock 33 mag of .357 Sig into her brain at point blank range to put her out of her misery, and only compounded that misery. My 45 Colt with light loads did her in with one shot. You never really know what will work.
I'm surprised. I would have thought the .357 Sig would work as it is like a .357-125 load. Thanks for sharing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
I used to watch the butcher at my uncle's farm in Puyalluip, WA put cows down with a .22 short. It was like he sliced it's legs off, straight to the ground. Not recommended for anyone less skilled than him I am sure.



I mean that's the easy meat right? :D But think about getting it home, it's not something you and a buddy can heave into the back of your pickup real easy. ;)
Walk the cow home and then shoot it, assuming that you're in the countryside.

It is probably important to know where to place your shot. I use to abalone dive when I was young. Abalone is a shellfish that has meat that is very tasty to some. If you don't prepare it right, it's as tough as a rubber tire. Some pound the meat. I heard of a few who knew where the nerve center is and if you insert a knife in the right place, the abalone muscle would go limp. If you inserted the knife anywhere else, the abalone muscle would tighten up..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,656 Posts
I'm surprised. I would have thought the .357 Sig would work as it is like a .357-125 load. Thanks for sharing.
What we found out later was that the exit holes were identical to the entry holes. The bullet didn't expand or cause any real cavitation. When the round first came out, only Sig made it, and that's what Dad had in the gun. He called them and they gave him some crap about a point-blank shot not being enough for the bullet to expand. He told them, rightfully so, that that makes them useless for almost anything you would need them for.

We had always used either a .22 rifle, a buck slug in a shotgun, or a 30-30 and had never had one survive a well-placed shot. Generally, the 22s go in and bounce around, and the 30-30s provide hydrostatic shock, slugs dump all their energy on the target. Those particular .357 bullets had too much energy to bounce around, handgun rounds are incapable of hydrostatic shock, in general, and the bullet didn't dump any of its energy passing through.

In this particular case, the ammo was not up to the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I would have to seriously consider .45 Colt and here is why:

1. Handgun and rifle
2. Easy to reload
3. Very versatile for reloading/use
4. Large caliber for bigger game and defense

I agree with others that mentioned defense would be key in such a situation. I would also rather hunt bigger game less often so I could concentrate on other survival activities.
 
61 - 78 of 78 Posts
Top