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P38 dissassembly

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Dusty, Apr 7, 2002.

  1. Dusty

    Dusty G&G Newbie

    Could anyone please tell me the proper way to totaly break down a P38. I have a byf43 that I just got , all matching ser#425. Could anyone tell me approx how old it is and also is there any way for sure to know if this 38 seen action? Any or all answers would be great..:) Thanks in advance.
    Dusty
     
  2. Kyrie

    Kyrie G&G Newbie

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    0
    Hi Dusty,

    Here are disassembly instructions:

    http://www.marstar.ca/AssemblyWalther.htm

    The “byfâ€￾ indicates it was made by Mauser, and the “43â€￾ indicates it was made in 1943. If the frame serial number doesn’t have a lower case script letter after it, it was likely made very early in 1943 - possibly January of that year.

    It terms of whether or not is “saw any actionâ€￾, probably not. Most German sidearms didn’t, as sidearms were not usually issued to enlisted men, and the officers who carried them had the job of directing the fight and not participating in it.

    Hope this helps!

    Best regards,

    Kyrie
     

  3. Dusty

    Dusty G&G Newbie

    Thanks very much for all the info. The site you sent was perfect..:) I love this forum, sooooo many smart people..
     
  4. Abwehr

    Abwehr G&G Newbie

    3
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    Kyrie,

    I have to respectfully disagree with you on the distribution of the P.38 pistol. It has been published by Whittington that most of the Combat pistols like the P.38, Luger, etc. were issued more to the enlisted man on the Machine Gun Crews, Engineers, etc. than officers. This would be those men that were at or very near the Front Lines. IF you look at vol 4 of Whittington's books "German Pistols and Holsters of WWII", he lists the TO&E for pistol issue.

    The officers were issued full size pistols if they were Front Line officers, and others were issued or purchased their own sidearm in smaller calibers. Most officers wore the smaller .32 automatics, and some even had the little .25 automatics.

    As you stated, many of the handguns issued were not used that much in combat. The Germans were big advocates of handguns unlike the Americans.

    Abwehr