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Im not any genius coming up with anything new, im just pointing out the obvious, to those who can think for themselves at least.

I was jut reading an article about whats going on in TX with the freezing temps and power outages.

One quoted several residents who complained about how they feel they were" left without nothing( actually mean "anything")"no hot food" not heat" no power, they cant even watc the news" is literally what they were saying.

Now, i've been of the prepper mindset for almost a decade now, so this is nothing new to me, but i cant imagine, even after living through this pandemic situation, people still have not learned that you cannot rely on the government, be it city state or fed, for you happiness, survival, wellbeing etc..
it doesnt even take much money, moreso just a mindset to be prepared for anything that life, nature, society, will throw your way.

Smarten up America! im not even talking about politics, just pure self preservation. obviously most folks here know this already so im just preaching to the chior.

alright.. nuff said.
 

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The government does not like us to be self sufficient and be able to fend for ourselves. They frown on people that have their own private properties and not relying on outside utilities and the grid. Well now we see how much they really care about people of all ages with no electric and no heat. People relying on electric to survive and some need electric for life sustaining machines like breathing and more. Its a damn mess to say the least for so damn many without power or heat now. It should not be like this with todays technology. And to think that they want to do away with gas and coal and other back up resources. We have no choice but to fend for ourselves and help others and check on others.
 

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The media loves to play the 'someone else's fault' victim game.

Was it justified in this case (as someone who lives here--at least most of the time) meh...yes and no....

MOST of us saw the increase dependence on 'renewables' which are really unreliable (excluding Hydro which is great when it's used as a larger dam). We knew our warnings about the CO2 scam were unheeded so chose to do something about it. And have some form of reasonable back up energy.

UNFORTUNATELY, in many residential areas building codes or HOA's bridle how new construction can be made (in that insane city of Berkeley and San Fran they're banning NATGAS in new construction). So were ready for it; at least as ready as anyone could be. We all have our 'outs'; longer term survival close to an urban area or even suburban area is always iffy. Most places are heated with natgas and few have 'real' fireplaces (and in some places are limited in ability to burn wood or coal by rule). So that leaves you with dependence on natgas and electricity. So most of us have alternate power sources or can go somewhere.

In THIS case, roads are passable, but bad. And there really isn't anywhere close to go that's above freezing. Even far--assuming you tanker some fuel--the situation is so widespread that there's limited options for travel or at least if you do there's a good chance you might place yourself in a worse situation with questionable fuel availability. Had thought about heading down to Houston (all the way on the gulf coast) but that abandons the place here (which will be damaged by the storm and we don't want to lose unless we have to) and they're in some ways worse off than we are (and now you roll in there maybe low on gas).

In any location, we're about as survivable as possible so have all the toys that keep things running (and if necessary can build a fire and set things up to stay warm). But one also wants to limit property damage (always secondary to personal survival) which means trying to keep things at home from freezing and the lights on. Despite dripping all the faucets and firing up the Emer gen (which has plenty of fuel reserves) one of our taps (on the north side of the house--most houses aren't built with enough insulation) has frozen; hopefully it won't burst when things warm up Friday but we'll see. So given the construction and ability for snow removal (none) it does limit your options. And there are really NO houses built here for this kind of freeze. None; and I don't know how foreseeable it might have been when a person built a house during the warmer years.

We've got plenty of food and water and can help others. And have been. So we understood what was likely to happen (and did) pretty early and like most everyone else here are and will deal with it. So we're not whining or depending on other folks for personal readiness. But there's only so many failure modes that can happen without something bad resulting given the setup you have. Being ready has certainly helped and nothing really unexpected has happened. The things that have have all been beyond our control. We've stockpiled all kinds of food and water (so that was never an issue) and at least a weeks' worth supply of energy with a standby that can run the house aside from high load stuff (energy storage for long term survival is always the hard part); more if we drain the tank of one of the cars (which isn't as easy as it used to be due to anti-siphon junk). Long term, this particular place isn't really set up to ride it out so we'd be somewhere better if that were the case. But this should be fine and we'll hold our own with only high class problems to deal with (which are all property damage related).

But imagine if a zero to 5 degree cold snap hit south or coastal Florida (with snow) for a week. Even with a couple weeks warning I'd bet you'd see some difficulty there (especially since lots of the homes are all electric).
 

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Hah! Yeah, I guess that is one advantage of living in rural Maine. We can count on the Fire Department and Ambulance services to a reasonable extent to help with immediate emergencies. But anything else, like police protection, food, water, power, transportation, and etc, is pretty much up to the individual. Not that folks don't help each other - we all do - but the "infrastructure just not there.
Gotta be self-sufficient. Or at least prepared to be self sufficient.
 

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Totally agree. How did we get to this point? I'm no spring chicken but I ain't that old either. Growing up in the mid-west in the 70's and 80's everyone would have been considered radical preppers by today's standards. We had thunderstorms in the summer and fall that knocked power out for hours/days. We had snow and ice storms that knocked power out for hours/days+ in the winter. We had wind in the spring that knocked power out for hours/days. And of course, we had 1970's - 1980's grid technology that failed at random times simply because it was 70's and 80's technology. We knew it. We expected it. We prepared for it. It was not an "alternate lifestyle". It was life. You were not a "prepper". You were just prepared.

I shudder to think what would happen today if the S really did hit the F.
 

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I think the green folks now have some evidence that wind and solar has problems. Here in Oklahoma the wind towers are fine but in Texas, they are frozen solid in large numbers, and solar does not work when covered in ice and snow and there is no sun. That means that the millions of folks in Texas without power have not been able to get the power they need from the massive wind farms that were supposed to save the planet. People are literally freezing and the pipes in their homes will freeze and this cold storm is devastating to many people for a long time. At least the members of Congress from Texas now know that wind and solar is fine, but there must be a solid fossil fuel base to heat the country in the winter. Duh? Hopefully this is a wake up call to them.
 
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Part of the problem is these self appointed "experts" mouthing off about "green energy" have probably never changed a battery in a flashlight.
 

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I think the green folks now have some evidence that wind and solar has problems. Here in Oklahoma the wind towers are fine but in Texas, they are frozen solid in large numbers, and solar does not work when covered in ice and snow and there is no sun. That means that the millions of folks in Texas without power have not been able to get the power they need from the massive wind farms that were supposed to save the planet. People are literally freezing and the pipes in their homes will freeze and this cold storm is devastating to many people for a long time. At least the members of Congress from Texas now know that wind and solar is fine, but there must be a solid fossil fuel base to heat the country in the winter. Duh? Hopefully this is a wake up call to them.
"Dream On" as Aerosmith says !!!
 

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The government does not like us to be self sufficient and be able to fend for ourselves. They frown on people that have their own private properties and not relying on outside utilities and the grid. Well now we see how much they really care about people of all ages with no electric and no heat. People relying on electric to survive and some need electric for life sustaining machines like breathing and more. Its a damn mess to say the least for so damn many without power or heat now. It should not be like this with todays technology. And to think that they want to do away with gas and coal and other back up resources. We have no choice but to fend for ourselves and help others and check on others.
I totally agree, the Gov doesn't want us thinking for ourselves. They want us dependent on them for all our needs.
If we started thinking on our own we may think we don't need them & vote all of those tax dollar sucking leaches out of office.
 

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I was just posting in another thread about renewable energy and how it can be successful. Down in Kodiak they have been 99% renewable (wind and hydro) since 2014 and they have some harsh weather conditions. It can be done, but only if you properly engineer it with a safety factor (such as irregular weather), have the proper geography for the system, and you take the necessary steps to maintain the system. Miss one of those three items and you will have a failure.
 

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Im not any genius coming up with anything new, im just pointing out the obvious, to those who can think for themselves at least.

I was jut reading an article about whats going on in TX with the freezing temps and power outages.

One quoted several residents who complained about how they feel they were" left without nothing( actually mean "anything")"no hot food" not heat" no power, they cant even watc the news" is literally what they were saying.

Now, i've been of the prepper mindset for almost a decade now, so this is nothing new to me, but i cant imagine, even after living through this pandemic situation, people still have not learned that you cannot rely on the government, be it city state or fed, for you happiness, survival, wellbeing etc..
it doesnt even take much money, moreso just a mindset to be prepared for anything that life, nature, society, will throw your way.

Smarten up America! im not even talking about politics, just pure self preservation. obviously most folks here know this already so im just preaching to the chior.

alright.. nuff said.
At one time even Alaska was having a hard time of it.
Remember 1988?

The Military transport that crashed?

In the largest winter war games ever in Alaska, called Brim Frost ’89, the 65-below-zero cold was winning the battle, sending 26,000 troops from the United States and Canada into retreat.
And late Sunday, a military transport plane carrying 18 Canadian special forces soldiers to the exercises crashed at Fort Wainwright near Fairbanks, killing at least 9, authorities said. It was not known immediately if the cold weather contributed to the crash of the C-130 Hercules,
firefighters called out to battle several blazes Sunday in Anchorage had frozen pumps on their trucks. “Most of our fires are being caused by people trying to thaw pipes,” a spokeswoman said.
cold is the single topic of conversation in Alaska.
When people talk about the cold, they no longer say “below zero” or “minus.” That’s taken for granted.


Alaska’s cold wave has tamed everything from soldiers to jet fighters, while making life a torment for residents trying to come to grips with frozen pipes.

Soldiers have suffered frostbite, equipment has failed, jet fighters have been grounded by ice fog and a major Air Force runway buckled because of the cold.
Anchorage had frozen pumps on their fire trucks. “Most of our fires are being caused by people trying to thaw pipes,” a spokeswoman said.
“You can’t get a plumber for the price of gold,” said veterinarian Joyce Murphy, who was trying to thaw pipes in her home. “You can’t find one.”
Chuck Renfro, owner of Curtis Plumbing & Heating in Eagle River, said he has been getting 150 calls a day since the cold snap started a week ago. “This is some kind of record for us,” he said.
Flights Canceled
Refueling of aircraft at Anchorage International Airport was slowed during the weekend by frigid temperatures and balky hydraulic systems. Several freight flights were canceled and 270 passengers aboard a Northwest Airlines flight from Chicago to Tokyo were stranded; after landing in Anchorage to refuel, one of the engines jammed, officials said.
The extreme cold can congeal lubricants in differentials and transmissions, freeze tires and freeze coolant in radiators.
Anchorage police said they rushed to answer calls about stalled vehicles. “It’s too cold to be left sitting in a car,” a spokeswoman said.
A list of cold-related problems released by state emergency services officials included dwindling fuel supplies, congealed heating fuel, frozen water and sewer lines and non-delivery of checks and federal food stamps.
Telephone communications with Alascom spokesman Tom Jensen said.
Communications with about 30 other communities were impaired, Jensen said.
The American Red Cross opened a shelter Sunday for Anchorage families with frozen pipes and no heat, while the National Guard prepared to air-drop food and fuel to towns cut off by the cold’s frozen-tight grip on virtually all of Alaska.
Various school districts also opened their buildings to people in need of shelter.
And, naturally, cold is the single topic of conversation in Alaska. When people talk about the cold, they no longer say “below zero” or “minus.” That’s taken for granted.
For example, Fairbanks forecaster Brian Lynn said in an interview Sunday: “The coldest today was 63 at McGrath, and there are lots of people in the 40s and 50s. But the west coast warmed up to the teens and 20s.”
As an afterthought, Lynn said: “That’s all below zero, of course.”

So as Alaskans we do deal with a our fair share of cold related issues like any Northern State, just keep in mind we had our drubbing from the Arctic Vortex and we learned a few things.
Now the peoples waaaay over in America are experencing a little sliver of it.
Dont mock or ridicule, if we can use our Alaskan Knowhow we might help those froze folks through this rough patch.

Stay Warm, Stay Safe!
 

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Most "green energy" actually isn't, at all. It just changes where the fossil fuels are are used, to either produce the "stuff" needed to build the green gadgets, or where the power is made, like the electricity to recharge electric cars. It's a shell game. And We The People are the rubes.
Add to that, "renewable" energy is only workable in the right environment. Solar in the southwest, marvelous! Solar in Alaska or Canada, you'll be freezing in the dark.
Wind power also only works in a windy environment, and not a breeze either. You need a long term heavy wind. Many areas just are not suitable. All things considered, nuke power is the best for powering metro areas. We can develop ways to reuse the waste. It's still "hot", it can be used, instead of buried.
 
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I was just posting in another thread about renewable energy and how it can be successful. Down in Kodiak they have been 99% renewable (wind and hydro) since 2014 and they have some harsh weather conditions. It can be done, but only if you properly engineer it with a safety factor (such as irregular weather), have the proper geography for the system, and you take the necessary steps to maintain the system. Miss one of those three items and you will have a failure.
You can't let CHILDREN, fashion models, and bean counters decide and design every thing.
 

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You can't let CHILDREN, fashion models, and bean counters decide and design every thing.
That's exactly my point. Actions of emotion tend to fall apart when no logical thought or long term plan is in place. Just doing something for the sake of doing it rarely ends well. People want the easy button to make them feel all fuzzy inside...<insert hoity toity voice>"oh Margot, lets go buy electric cars and save the planet"...we owe this not only to the planet, but our children". - - meanwhile at the nearest Cobalt mine used to provide ore for those electric car batteries natural vegetation has died away, a lunar like landscape remains and the wildlife have moved on. Nice trade there!

Don't even get me started on the idiots who pushed for low sulfur diesel and the zero gain that resulted in - - other than a price increase.
 

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Im not any genius coming up with anything new, im just pointing out the obvious, to those who can think for themselves at least.

I was jut reading an article about whats going on in TX with the freezing temps and power outages.

One quoted several residents who complained about how they feel they were" left without nothing( actually mean "anything")"no hot food" not heat" no power, they cant even watc the news" is literally what they were saying.

Now, i've been of the prepper mindset for almost a decade now, so this is nothing new to me, but i cant imagine, even after living through this pandemic situation, people still have not learned that you cannot rely on the government, be it city state or fed, for you happiness, survival, wellbeing etc..
it doesnt even take much money, moreso just a mindset to be prepared for anything that life, nature, society, will throw your way.

Smarten up America! im not even talking about politics, just pure self preservation. obviously most folks here know this already so im just preaching to the chior.

alright.. nuff said.
Amen Brother. I'm in Plano (a suburb of Dallas) and am in the thick of the storm. And while not a 'prepper' per se I do have what I need to get through this mess. A few space heaters if needed, plenty of food and bottled water, and a small generator to keep essentials up and running. Being a bit of a flashlight geek I have some real butt-kicker flashlights. Two of those survival type radios where you crank the lever to charge a battery so it never needs one. These things were not purchased recently, I've had them for years and they've come in handy now and then, My SUV has AWD (wouldn't own one without 4WD or AWD) and the wife and I went out to run a few errands yesterday. We are stocked up with what we need to outlast whatever comes. People need to brace up and toughen up a bit, I think. I'm all for government supporting infrastructure, clearing roads, and keeping things safe - that's what our taxes pay for, after all, But you gotta' take care of YOU and cannot expect anyone else do to it for you! Been in Texas for 27 years and this is the worst I've ever seen. But wee are prepared to wait this out until it passes. And I'm originally from Southern California!! LOL!!!
 

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You can't let CHILDREN, fashion models, and bean counters decide and design every thing.
Not all locations have the georgraphy of Kodiak Island.
And if they did the adjoining Federal lands might have a few things to say about that.
 

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Down in Kodiak they have been 99% renewable (wind and hydro) since 2014
FWIW... Hydro is certainly renewable and it is pretty green. Unless you are a salmon. Or a steelhead. Or a sturgeon. Or a coastal cutthroat. Or a Dolly Varden. Or a lamprey. Or a commercial fisherman relying on the first two to feed your family. Or a sport angler chasing any of the first five. Or a tribal member with cultural ties to all of the above. Those are for the west coast. East coast would be American shad, Atlantic salmon, American eel, striped bass, probably a few I'm not aware of, and tribal members that have ties to all of them.

Don't get me wrong, hydro is pretty green, but it is just like anything else. There are trade-offs and there ain't NO free lunch. Something or someone somewhere pays a price for us to have electricity.

Transparency statement: My electricity is 90% hydro and my livelihood is indirectly tied to hydro, so I ain't knocking it. But it isn't a silver bullet either. Take the good and acknowledge the bad.
 

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FWIW... Hydro is certainly renewable and it is pretty green. Unless you are a salmon. Or a steelhead. Or a sturgeon. Or a coastal cutthroat. Or a Dolly Varden. Or a lamprey. Or a commercial fisherman relying on the first two to feed your family. Or a sport angler chasing any of the first five. Or a tribal member with cultural ties to all of the above. Those are for the west coast. East coast would be American shad, Atlantic salmon, American eel, striped bass, probably a few I'm not aware of, and tribal members that have ties to all of them.

Don't get me wrong, hydro is pretty green, but it is just like anything else. There are trade-offs and there ain't NO free lunch. Something or someone somewhere pays a price for us to have electricity.

Transparency statement: My electricity is 90% hydro and my livelihood is indirectly tied to hydro, so I ain't knocking it. But it isn't a silver bullet either. Take the good and acknowledge the bad.
Absolutely! In kodiak there is a specific requirement to have so much snow pack in the winter to determine what amount of hydro can be used. There have been times where they went without hydro because of low snow...this prompted them to look for an alternate which was wind. They alternate between the two. You are absolutely correct that hydro can destroy habitat, and that is why it takes proper planning and engineering to protect.
 
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