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Why are you posting a picture without more info? Pictures of both sides and top of barrel? And inside the crane where model numbers are normally found and of course any serial number. What caliber?

It is a Smith and Wesson 1917 patent or copy. There should be lettering on the top of the barrel if it is a true Smith and Wesson. Also, the plating looks too good. If it is a common SW replate that factory, a very common event, there will be an R stamped under the grip or somewhere on the gun. What history to you know of the gun?
 

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it is obviously a S&W copy but it isn’t a 1917 because it isn’t large enough to be a .45 caliber. Although similar there are differences in the hand ejector copy that Ranger posted If you look closely at the details. Copies of the .hand ejector models were produced in several frame sizes and were made in factories as well as cottage industries in various countries. The mid sized .32/38 K frame and small .32/.22 I frame are the most common. Some copies were produced without roll marks, making it difficult or impossible to identify their origin. If the OP would post photos of any markings on the barrel and frame, it might be possible to provide a proper identification.
 

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Yes, it is the 1905 patent
it is obviously a S&W copy but it isn’t a 1917 because it isn’t large enough to be a .45 caliber. Although similar there are differences in the hand ejector copy that Ranger posted If you look closely at the details. Copies of the .hand ejector models were produced in several frame sizes and were made in factories as well as cottage industries in various countries. The mid sized .32/38 K frame and small .32/.22 I frame are the most common. Some copies were produced without roll marks, making it difficult or impossible to identify their origin. If the OP would post photos of any markings on the barrel and frame, it might be possible to provide a proper identification.
You are correct, I was thinking about the 1917 model I have in my safe that belongs to a family member. Of course the model of 1917 is 45 acp. Not an error just an old feeble mind is my excuse.

The one pictured below is indeed a 5 screw hand ejector that by serial was made in 1917. It is above 95% gun in my view, best I have seen. It looks better in person, the camera exaggerates the scratches. Many have the original 1905 patent date on them, this one does not.

On the barrel it shows the patents as follows: October 8, 01; Dec 17, 01; Feb 8, 08; Sep 14, 08, and Dec 29, 14.

If looks remarkably like the one in OPs picture. This one has the 5 screws but the 5 inch barrel which makes it a 4th revision. The OP's gun does have the 5th screw at the front of the trigger guard which make it look exactly like a copy of this one. A picture of the other side would of course confirm that. Also, the OP's gun is missing the SW logo on the left side and the cartridge designation which is on the left side of the barrel on this one. So, it is a copy of one made after 1914 and after the 4th revision.

Air gun Trigger Wood Revolver Gun barrel


Hello OP, are you there?
 

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I finally found it. This is an Orbea Hermanos revolver, made in Eibar. They made high quality hand-ejectors that were Sliiiightly different from S&Ws. The company was founded in 1840, and stopped making guns in 1926. I have one of their "Model 1" Smith Top-breaks in my collection.

The company is still in business as a bicycle maker.
 

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I finally found it. This is an Orbea Hermanos revolver, made in Eibar. They made high quality hand-ejectors that were Sliiiightly different from S&Ws. The company was founded in 1840, and stopped making guns in 1926. I have one of their "Model 1" Smith Top-breaks in my collection.

The company is still in business as a bicycle maker.
I think I said that at post 4.
 
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