Plinking vs training.

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Doglips, May 13, 2002.

  1. Doglips

    Doglips Guest

    9,080
    21
    Like many of you I have read the most knowledgeable Jeff Cooper and others. Yet I find myself at the range standing quitely at known distances shooting in a relaxed setting...very un like real life. In any case my local gun club is starting this IDPA shooting...just starting and is a big learning curve. I plan on shooting at the next event....should be fun. But it also got me thinking.....Since I have said I plan to use a firearm to defend myself and family should I not train and not plink? Will the bad dude stand nice and still well I get a good sight picture, shooting glasses and ear muffs on and then shot?. So Do you train or plink? If you train how do you train..ie el presadenta drills, failure to feed drills ect?:confused: :confused: :target: :assult:
     
  2. Stock Doc

    Stock Doc G&G Evangelist

    You should use you're guns in every way you can so as to be so familiar with it that if the moment arises that you need it to defend you dont even think about how to use it. Problem is you shoot it maybe twice a year then need it and forget where the safety is.
    I know so many guys that leave there Deer rifles put away for a full year and only take it out for the season. Atleast oil it but you should get out and practice with it. Biggest problem I see here is people take there safety off because there not familiar with the gun and are scared they'll fumble trying to take it off. Very dangerous and once you get used to you gun you will see you can empty it and the deer hasnt run 50 yards and he wil have a bunch of holes in him {not good}. This makes you realize you have plenty of time and slow down along with practicing perodically with the rifle of gun you use. Make shooting a sport not just a protection of food getter. Rick B
     

  3. jerry

    jerry Since 03-15- 2002 Forum Contributor

    26,564
    24,983
    USA
    dummy mags and snap caps are available for a lot of guns out there. this increases the amount of time you get to handle the weapon, dry fire, drop and inser mags etc. speer as may others also offer plastic bullets fired by only primers. still need ventalation etc. (just an option) a good friend of mine was the best 1911 toter you ever did want to see. he admitted that he was not worh a crap when woken up. to solve this problem he got a nice little Taurus 85CH in .38 special. Being a concealed hammer he didn't even have that to go wrong. there are alot of fine DAO auto's out ther as well.
    as far as clearing real world jams etc. you need to get them which means you should need to shoot a lot with alot of different ammo. if your gun and ammo combo are good you may hardly see it. I fired 7000 .45 relaods before i had a stovepipe. Another time i ran one clip of factory hardball and stoved on the 3rd round. You never know I guess???
    You have to have confidence in your abioities and equipment, some guns require more than others. if you don't have the time to dedicate consider a different weapons SYSTEM, this means the big picture not just the gun. . I know I probably didn't help much and may sound somewhat harsh, but it is a huge sybject with a lot of grey area.
     
  4. NRAJOE

    NRAJOE YOU TALKIN' TO ME!? Forum Contributor

    DO BOTH MAN,YOU CAN NEVER SPEND TOO MUCH TIME SHOOTING NO MATTER WHAT YOUR DOING,OR HOW YOU DO IT!!!
     
  5. Shaun

    Shaun G&G Evangelist

    I stop when my shooting turns to random plinking every shot is for precision even if I make the target something more challenging and reactive than paper
     
  6. BenP

    BenP Guest

    395
    0
    Plinking can be viewed as an exercise in familiarization and confidence building. I often like to finish my serious shooting sessions with a little light, relaxed target practice, like shooting dirt clods, or popping balloons at a hundred yards. I don't keep track of shots per hit, or bullseyes when I'm plinking. I'm just seeing if everything is feeling natural, or if I'm too sloppy when I'm relaxed. The feedback should be obvious. If, in a relaxed and unstressed state, my shooting is abnormally sloppy, then perhaps I've not fitted the gun to my form as much as contorting to fit myself more to the gun.

    I do this with shotguns and carbines and find that, due to my size (6'6", 260 lbs) I have to adjust for too short a length of pull, which makes me chicken wing my arms out away from my body more. It is important to know that I am adjusting to these firearms, so that I can predict my performance with them under more stressful and critical shooting. Plinking is a tool that can benefit the shooter's ability to adjust to different shooting stresses and conditions.
     
  7. Calvin

    Calvin G&G Evangelist

    I agree with Ben. Plinking is shooting, nonetheless. If you plink with the gun you intend to use, shooting a rolling pop can is a very good exercise. I plink with all of my guns, as it gives me a sense of which ones I can use in a snap-shoot situation. When I was in the Army, we got a little "plinking time", and used it to full advantage.
    If you are comfortable with your weapon, and know what it will/won't do, you won't have the wrong gun should things go South on you. JMHO
     
  8. TKH

    TKH Guest

    69
    0
    A number of top shooters quit practicing when their focus starts to fade, they believe that "Practice doesn't make perfect, only perfect practice makes perfect." I agree to some extent, but also think that any trigger time is good trigger time. I like to shoot for practice, but also shoot for recreation, and approach them both differently.
     
  9. TKH

    TKH Guest

    69
    0
    FYI, to graduate from a police academy in Colorado, you must pass the following course with a 70% (I know, I know, I think the scores should be higher, I also think the course needs some modifications. Only posting it here for info!!!)

    Anyhow, it doesn't paste well, so go to the website and check under Firearms Training Program.

    http://www.ago.state.co.us/post/posthome.html
     
  10. Shaun

    Shaun G&G Evangelist

    Sounds like my old agency qual's
     
  11. oneastrix

    oneastrix G&G Newbie

    I train at close distances. Quick draw and point shooting. I do some from further back with sights involved, but gun fights are mostly up close and personal. I focus on combat accuracy, not MOA and such. A lot of off hand and one hand shooting. see my signature below.....

    I also do alot of tactical reload drills, clear malfunctions and such. i like to shoot on the move. I don't plan n standing still with lead flying at me. I'll crawl behind a blade of grass if I have to!
     
  12. TKH

    TKH Guest

    69
    0
    The Supreme court has held that "qualification's" are not training. As such, I insist our officers qualify 4 times per year, and train 4 to 6 more times. Our training includes shoot/don't shoot targets, tactical scenarios (some of which can be resolved w/o shooting) shooting while moving, shooting from under/over/around/inside a car, overhead lights on at night, sirens on, distance shooting (100 yds), weak hand, unfamiliar gun, stoppages, ammo management, etc, etc. The more realistic the better, the more they have to think the better. I like the old Navy Seals Motto ( I think it's their's anyway) that "The more you bleed in training, the less you bleed in combat"
    Training should be realistic, not static "paper punching"
     
  13. jerry

    jerry Since 03-15- 2002 Forum Contributor

    26,564
    24,983
    USA
    ever shot FATS?