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This forum is to discuss the possibilities, how the two cross over and other enthusiasts that are interested in discussing things in a civil manner. This is not the place to discuss politics or just post "gun control" rhetoric. Just like not every gun owner isn't a fan of every type of firearm or accessory made, this is just another accessory.
 

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Old man, No tact...
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I don't think I'd be a fan of "smart guns". If I had one, and it was "assigned" to me, what happens in a self defense situation and I get disabled..... my wife can't use the gun in my stead? Perhaps I could get an "app" to allow or assign other users?

Then there's the reliably issue. Could I find myself with an unusable firearm after a nearby lightning strike? ...or perhaps sliding my feet across the carpet in the winter... could that "render the gun useless?

Then, there's always the "back door" to many new technologies.....

I'm thinkin' I'm just too old and set in my ways to embrace this sort of new technology. I"ll have to pass.... :usa:
 

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I think smart guns can have their place but as one of many options. Some people use gun safes, some have trigger locks, some have a biometric lock on a safe under the bed. Different uses for different options. Unfortunately the current market has been an all or nothing solution.

Most solutions out there are kludgy and often too expensive. What if the market for smart components was like an AR? Choose the barrel/bolt/caliber that works for you.
 

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I learned something nifty the other day regarding the guns that read finger prints - the scanners also detect blood flow. The good news is that someone couldn't just jut your thumb off or something to use the gun. The bad news is that if your hands are cold the scanner might not detect them. I guess that's why so many people see hope for the RFID ones instead.
 

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Some fingerprint sensors require the warmth of live skin or bloodflow. A warm gummy worm with the fingerprint or residual smudge on the sensor also works on some of them. With biometrics a big question is the crossover error rate. What % of false positives and false negatives can the sensor expect.
 

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Old man, No tact...
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With biometrics a big question is the crossover error rate. What % of false positives and false negatives can the sensor expect.
Better question.... what % of "failure to detect the REAL owner" would be acceptable? My "old fashion" carry guns are 100% reliable. I'll still pass. :usa:
 

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A 17 year old just got paid $50,000 for his version of a fingerprint reading gun by a CA tech group. Supposed to work with even partial prints, and can be programmed with many fingerprints at the same time, not just one. They claim 99.99% accuracy on the fingerprint read. I'll never believe it. I've tried to get a PC's fingerprint scanner to take my print. Wound up disabling it as it never would read my print, or the owners print.
http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/09/11/group-gives-17-year-old-50000-for-his-gun-innovations/

I say that that .01% is about a million times too big a chance of failure for me. I can just see my son trying to use one. Because of his work, he has to be fingerprinted before each new government or school based job starts (they won't use anyones previous ones for some reason. Stupid government.) Anyway, every time he has to go multiple times to get printed by the FBI scanners. His hands take a lot of damage in his work, and the FBI scanners usually can't read his prints well enough to get a usable print!

Also consider that with the first commercially available smart gun sold in the US, NJ's Smart Gun Law is triggered.
The statute bans the sale of all ordinary handguns in New Jersey within 30 months of the date when “at least one manufacturer has delivered at least one production model of a personalized handgun to a registered or licensed wholesale or retail dealer in New Jersey or any other state.” N.J. Stats. sect.
2C:58–2.2 et seq. A so-called “smart” gun is one with some kind of technology such that only the owner is supposed to be able to fire it.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...mandate-to-trigger-handgun-ban-in-new-jersey/

I'll stick with my good old fashioned dumb guns.
 

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A hardware "solution" for a user problem imo

Maybe we need to develop a "smart hammer" that sends a sonar wave out on the downstroke....if it doesn't detect a nail (the metal kind not the finger kind) it changes the molecules of the hammer head into harmless Nerf foam.

That should cut down on the number of homicides involving hammers.
 
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