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Go to ArtfulBullets.com or Castbulletsassoc.org, or Castboolits.gunloads.com. There is a wealth of information and help there. For some advice, look for a used toaster oven to powder coat your bullets. I found mine for free when driving through a neighborhood during trash day. A woman was throwing it out. Be sure to use #5 recycle tubes to shake your bullets and powder to build the static charge that holds the powder to the bullet. Shredded cheese tubs work well for me. I don't use the rubber bbs as suggested by some. Instead, I use styrofoam cup pieces. Not all powder paint is the same. Eastwood.com is one source for powder paint. To me, Harbor Freight powder paint doesn't adhere to the bullets well. I found most of my paint at a local powder coating service. Sometimes they gave me powder paint and sometimes I bought it at a lower price than Eastwood. I have a lifetime supply of powder paint now. Some of the paint works great. Some doesn't have an even color but works. One such color is white. So, I PC my 38-148WC bullets with them. After I shake my bullets, I pour powder and bullets over a screen. The powder falls through the screen onto a newspaper. I then fold the newspaper and pour the paint back in the tub. I pour the bullets onto the aluminum lined tray. I've had my best luck using non-stick aluminum. to bake my PC bullets on. I have tossed my hot bullets into water but am considering just rolling them on a newspaper covered concrete floor so the paint can flow out. I hope this helps.
 

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Go to ArtfulBullets.com or Castbulletsassoc.org, or Castboolits.gunloads.com. There is a wealth of information and help there. For some advice, look for a used toaster oven to powder coat your bullets. I found mine for free when driving through a neighborhood during trash day. A woman was throwing it out. Be sure to use #5 recycle tubes to shake your bullets and powder to build the static charge that holds the powder to the bullet. Shredded cheese tubs work well for me. I don't use the rubber bbs as suggested by some. Instead, I use styrofoam cup pieces. Not all powder paint is the same. Eastwood.com is one source for powder paint. To me, Harbor Freight powder paint doesn't adhere to the bullets well. I found most of my paint at a local powder coating service. Sometimes they gave me powder paint and sometimes I bought it at a lower price than Eastwood. I have a lifetime supply of powder paint now. Some of the paint works great. Some doesn't have an even color but works. One such color is white. So, I PC my 38-148WC bullets with them. After I shake my bullets, I pour powder and bullets over a screen. The powder falls through the screen onto a newspaper. I then fold the newspaper and pour the paint back in the tub. I pour the bullets onto the aluminum lined tray. I've had my best luck using non-stick aluminum. to bake my PC bullets on. I have tossed my hot bullets into water but am considering just rolling them on a newspaper covered concrete floor so the paint can flow out. I hope this helps.
I use the black plastic bb’s, but I like the idea of styrofoam pieces.
My toaster oven was $10 from a thrift store and looked new.
I use the purple surgical gloves as they seem to not attract the paint when I touch the bullets.

Basically, my method is slightly different but you’ve written out the start to finish directions pretty succinctly.
 
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I use the black plastic bb’s, but I like the idea of styrofoam pieces.
My toaster oven was $10 from a thrift store and looked new.
I use the purple surgical gloves as they seem to not attract the paint when I touch the bullets.

Basically, my method is slightly different but you’ve written out the start to finish directions pretty succinctly.
I use tweezers to position and pick up PC bullets
 

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i use gloves and stand them all up.

anyway the basic process is to get a little static going.
you do that by shaking and swirling the bullets in a tub like cool whip comes in.
dump the bullets out.
put them on a wire rack or stand them up.
cook them at 400-F for 20 minutes.
dump them out to cool off.
size if necessary.
load and shoot.

here is a good thread about your question, it has links to other threads and pictures and stuff.
 

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My ingots are made of range scrap and I let them sit awhile before testing them for hardness. I've noticed the lead hardness changes.. Does anyone let their water dropped and possibly air cooled bullets age so the lead hardness would stabilize?
 

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yes.
a month at minimum, but for stuff i care about i let them go 6 months.

the reason i do that is so i can monitor the age hardening AND the growth.
i've been caught out by antimonial growth before and walking back to the truck then driving home to knock out a bullet from the barrel is not how i like to spend my opening morning.
 

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To help D Crocket out, what is your opinion on pc rubbing off during the seating process. I've found that if I don't flare my cases, the edge of the case will scratch the pc off. I'm wondering if a thick wall casing also rubs the paint off the bullets. I'm thinking that Remington brass would be a good cast bullet casing because the casing walls are thinner.
 

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yes.
a month at minimum, but for stuff i care about i let them go 6 months.

the reason i do that is so i can monitor the age hardening AND the growth.
i've been caught out by antimonial growth before and walking back to the truck then driving home to knock out a bullet from the barrel is not how i like to spend my opening morning.
I am new at casting & powder coating bullets. please tell me more about antimonial growth. does antimony expand with age? or if too much is in the mix?
 

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it will do it in low amounts too.
if your alloy has some tin in the mix it seems to mitigate the growth, and the growth is unpredictable.
it may or may not happen, and it's mostly associated with quench cooling.
yeah i know sounds like hooie.. LOL, but it does happen just like it takes time for the alloy to reach it's final hardness.

anyway what happens is, it takes time for all the components in the alloy to find their final resting place, the small amount of tin binds to the antimony and holds it there by creating a SbSn chain.
the tin doesn't really love lead it merely likes lead but antimony is shaped differently so any free antimony in the alloy tries to move around and spread out evenly this changes the diameter slightly.

as an aside.
the funny thing about antimony is it is a hard crystal but it breaks down when placed under pressure, this allows the lead to slide in those places and move much more freely.

tin.
it works differently in lead but does basically the same thing, it actually allows the alloy to soften over time, but provides a different type of strengthening.
the combination of the two is a good thing [for the strength of the internals] even if the tin isn't needed to cast a good bullet.

the only real problem with very much tin in the alloy is it seems to retard the adhesion of a powder coat in amounts of over 2% or so.
4% is a real problem and even if the coat is nice and even it will be quite thin.
[less than .001 thick]
 
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part of a good coating is for it to remain flexible and stay on the bullet.
the old hammer smash test is one way to make sure the coating has been cooked off and cured properly.
can the coating be scraped off?? well yeah, even a copper wrapped bullet can suffer scratches and other damage if not seated into the case properly, or if the case hasn't been champhered or flared properly.
the coating can also be damaged in a rough throat or sharp chamber edge, but so can any other type of bullet.

since we are here i might as well touch on sizing.
with a normal cast bullet the old saying is to go as big as will fit in the rifle.
i've never really followed that, .002 is plenty bigger, and i have gone down to exactly the same size as the barrel.
with powder coating you don't want to go real big or hardly even bigger.
in a 308 for example 309 is big enough 308 may work better, the reason is to avoid the scraping on the end of the chamber before going into the throat.
 

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I thought quenching was good and made the lead harder. I drop my bullets from the mold into a bucket of water. should I stop doing that? should I re-size or check the dimeter of my bullets after a month or so? or should I let newly cast bullets "sit" for a Month or so before powder coating & sizing?
 

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it doesn't make the lead harder it traps pieces of antimony in different parts of the bullet.
this gives you a harder reading on a BHN scale.

hopefully that made sense.

as to letting them sit before coating and cooking.
it's probably not necessary.
when you cook the bullets to cure the powder your actually drawing back the hardness.

the way i cook mine is a little bit different than what most others do.

i bring my oven up in three stages.
the first is to 325F and i hold it there for about 15 minutes.
then i take it to 375 for 20 minutes, this is the 'wet' stage of the powder where it flows and smooths out, kind of like self leveling paint.
then i take the oven up to the full 400F and hold it for a full 20 minutes when it gets there.
when the time is up i turn off the oven and watch for the temp to drop about 5 degrees.
[2-3ish minutes]
then I take the tray out and dump the bullets in a bucket of water.

what this does is give me a full hour of soak time [necessary to quench] and a consistent batch to batch hardness regardless of whether i air cool or water drop my bullets initially.

most others don't water drop or care about time other than the 20 minute cure time.
 

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it doesn't make the lead harder it traps pieces of antimony in different parts of the bullet.
this gives you a harder reading on a BHN scale.

hopefully that made sense.

as to letting them sit before coating and cooking.
it's probably not necessary.
when you cook the bullets to cure the powder your actually drawing back the hardness.

the way i cook mine is a little bit different than what most others do.

i bring my oven up in three stages.
the first is to 325F and i hold it there for about 15 minutes.
then i take it to 375 for 20 minutes, this is the 'wet' stage of the powder where it flows and smooths out, kind of like self leveling paint.
then i take the oven up to the full 400F and hold it for a full 20 minutes when it gets there.
when the time is up i turn off the oven and watch for the temp to drop about 5 degrees.
[2-3ish minutes]
then I take the tray out and dump the bullets in a bucket of water.

what this does is give me a full hour of soak time [necessary to quench] and a consistent batch to batch hardness regardless of whether i air cool or water drop my bullets initially.

most others don't water drop or care about time other than the 20 minute cure time.
Good idea.
 
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