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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon everyone!

Well, I was down on campus today at my alma mater, and ideally future law school. While right now I am angry that my tail light is busted (I'll get some tape for the meantime) I'm not going to fault anyone for those tight friggin spots. Just bound to happen sooner or later. Anyways, I have been looking at the apartment complex I am planning on living in, as soon as the floor plan I want opens up, and in the meantime I am prepping*.

I add the asterisk as I realize that this has to be an entirely different scenario than having a house, or something with a yard. I'll have a balcony high up enough up I can wander naked through the place and those who are vouyeristic enough will only be familiar with the goings on. That said, prepping in a small sense isn't all to foreign of a concept. When the pandemic began, we weren't sweating out having toilet paper and ramen. or many other staples around the house. I have actually gone out of my way and have composed a room by room list on all the "essentials" I can think of. That might be fine and dandy for a blizzard, getting the flu (pneumonia is going to kill me if I, god forbid, get it a third time....not something great to have confirmed in your 20s) or for a few days where I just have to buckle down and study for exams. Then again, being in Denver (where I cannot afford to rent a house; I plan on living alone) and where we had the 2020 BS with the "protests" prepping has me curious. I can read all the articles that I want, but I do have to extrapolate. How exactly do I account for living in an apartment and what should be prioritized?
 
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space, budget, and consider what you'll actually eat.
if you don't like ramen or spaghetti,,, don't buy them.
but they got the shelf life of a cockroach.
you also need to figure out a way to boil the water they need.

for a single person a couple of 8' tall and 4' wide book shelves covered with a curtain would hold extra water, a cooker, and enough food for a week easy.
 

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Is the stove in the apartment gas or electric? If it's electric, I'd recommend getting a camp stove and or grill for heating water, cooking hot food, etc. and a table to put it/them on out on the balcony. That way you won't be stuck with ramen for a week.

Consider what you will and won't eat. You may hate canned vegetables so look for dried, but they're an essential part of a balanced diet, as is protein. Go lower sodium if you can; you can always add salt, but you can't subtract it. Look at some of the backpacker's dehydrated meals and even Walmart sells emergency meal buckets now. Those might be a good source of things to have that you can add to. Even though you'll be living alone, stock up enough meals for 2 for 2 weeks just in case. It's better to have a little too much than not enough. You don't have to cook for 2, but you'll have the extra in case you're stuck for more than 2 weeks.

Come up with one or two pot / pan meals that you can toss together easily and taste good. One of my favorite quick and easy 1 pan wonders is scrambled eggs with vegetables, shredded cheese and Spam tossed in. When it's done you can make sandwiches out of it or just pile it on your plate and have at. it's hot, filling, and for me at least, tastes good. If you've got leftover meat from the day before, you can cut that up and toss it in instead of the Spam.

If you're planning for a winter storm situation, make sure you've got a couple of coolers you can empty your fridge and freezer into and put those out on the balcony as well. When you're not using them for food, they're great for storing your stove, propane tanks, lanterns, etc.
 

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Canned chicken is relatively inexpensive, can be eaten cold, and is pretty good when combined with a can of refried beans. Add some BBQ or hot sauce. Better if you have a way to heat it. Consider a propane grill on your balcony with a side burner. Dirty Moore beef stew is good too, and a decent value for the money. Canned spaghetti or Alfredo sauce makes ramen less boring and more palatable, so does a big container of grated parmesan.
 

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Other folks I know have bought those plastic crates, and stored the prepping supplies under the bed, if one has to leave, they are already packed. Vacant space should always be filled with water, it is cheap and you will always use it, so bottled water is never an expense. Then a supply of food, canned, microwaveable, freeze dried, whatever. Just something you will always eat down the road, there is no expense just buying in advance. One crate will hold spare underwear, boots and basic clothing, nothing extra just putting it in a place for a fast exit. One crate for small tools, knife, pliers, screwdriver, folding saw, paracord, couple of small tarps, just basic stuff and of course a five pack of Bic lighters, no reason to mess with the fire starter stuff. And a small container of fishing hooks and a collapsible rod and reel, or just the reel, you can always tape a teel on a long stick. Did I say spices? And of course dru

If they let you store guns and ammo, then one crate devoted to your ammo and related gear. Make you bed with a long bedspread and no one will ever know you have a stash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
space, budget, and consider what you'll actually eat.
if you don't like ramen or spaghetti,,, don't buy them.
but they got the shelf life of a cockroach.
you also need to figure out a way to boil the water they need.

for a single person a couple of 8' tall and 4' wide book shelves covered with a curtain would hold extra water, a cooker, and enough food for a week easy.

Space, that's a good one to think on! The unit I'm after is about 950 sq ft, decent sized 1 bed 1 bath. Have thought about taking the "hall closet" (off the entry) and making that my pantry. It has a walk in closet in the bedroom to the bathroom, that should be plenty suitable for my clothes and recreational gear, even think an armoire in the bedroom for professional clothes would open space. Ramen and pasta are at the top of my list to stack up on, along with other grains (rice, barley) and canned stuffs which may not last as long. As far as boiling water, I don't know what the grilling policy is (yet), and I mention this as my godfather had to take down his grill at his condo. Being a natural rebel, I'm thinking an MSR single burner stove, a Coleman multi fuel 2 burner, and if I can get away with it a Weber Q. Fuel should last a while, and I could store that out of sight in the walk in closet in a plastic bin
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is the stove in the apartment gas or electric? If it's electric, I'd recommend getting a camp stove and or grill for heating water, cooking hot food, etc. and a table to put it/them on out on the balcony. That way you won't be stuck with ramen for a week.

Consider what you will and won't eat. You may hate canned vegetables so look for dried, but they're an essential part of a balanced diet, as is protein. Go lower sodium if you can; you can always add salt, but you can't subtract it. Look at some of the backpacker's dehydrated meals and even Walmart sells emergency meal buckets now. Those might be a good source of things to have that you can add to. Even though you'll be living alone, stock up enough meals for 2 for 2 weeks just in case. It's better to have a little too much than not enough. You don't have to cook for 2, but you'll have the extra in case you're stuck for more than 2 weeks.

Come up with one or two pot / pan meals that you can toss together easily and taste good. One of my favorite quick and easy 1 pan wonders is scrambled eggs with vegetables, shredded cheese and Spam tossed in. When it's done you can make sandwiches out of it or just pile it on your plate and have at. it's hot, filling, and for me at least, tastes good. If you've got leftover meat from the day before, you can cut that up and toss it in instead of the Spam.

If you're planning for a winter storm situation, make sure you've got a couple of coolers you can empty your fridge and freezer into and put those out on the balcony as well. When you're not using them for food, they're great for storing your stove, propane tanks, lanterns, etc.
Good question! I unfortunately think it's electric. If that's the case I am definitely on the camp stove/grill wagon. We had an electric stove when I was little and that thing was a POS despite being well made by GE (I like GE and Maytag lol).For stoves, and I mentioned a Weber Q, I will need to look into a table that's not for entertainment use.

And thankfully I am not a picky eater! I have a list of ones to keep frozen, and also canned to keep on hand. Dried veggies, those I need to look for, those would be awesome even just for camping and doing, say a stir fry. Low sodium is good advice, I'm borderline on my blood pressure as it is so where I can take it out, or season up to my sweet spot that'll work wonders. I do that with the Campbells soups because I add in so many seasonings (tomato soup with smoked paprika, cayenne, garlic and onion power, OMG) anyways. 2 for 2 weeks, in case I have company :cool:😈, or I could also consider that 1 month for one person.

I love doing scrambles just like that! I also do quite a bit with a wok, but those can be time consuming/energy consuming. Cooler(s) suggestion is a fantastic idea!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Canned chicken is relatively inexpensive, can be eaten cold, and is pretty good when combined with a can of refried beans. Add some BBQ or hot sauce. Better if you have a way to heat it. Consider a propane grill on your balcony with a side burner. Dirty Moore beef stew is good too, and a decent value for the money. Canned spaghetti or Alfredo sauce makes ramen less boring and more palatable, so does a big container of grated parmesan.
Oh yeah, now those sound like our camping meals, love making those! Canned corned beef is a favorite around here as well lol. When the old man and I were camping last month we did Armor stew over rice (his IBS was flared up and he couldn't really do the dried potatoes on the side) and that was incredible with some Lee and Perrins, crushed reds and black pepper!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Other folks I know have bought those plastic crates, and stored the prepping supplies under the bed, if one has to leave, they are already packed. Vacant space should always be filled with water, it is cheap and you will always use it, so bottled water is never an expense. Then a supply of food, canned, microwaveable, freeze dried, whatever. Just something you will always eat down the road, there is no expense just buying in advance. One crate will hold spare underwear, boots and basic clothing, nothing extra just putting it in a place for a fast exit. One crate for small tools, knife, pliers, screwdriver, folding saw, paracord, couple of small tarps, just basic stuff and of course a five pack of Bic lighters, no reason to mess with the fire starter stuff. And a small container of fishing hooks and a collapsible rod and reel, or just the reel, you can always tape a teel on a long stick. Did I say spices? And of course dru

If they let you store guns and ammo, then one crate devoted to your ammo and related gear. Make you bed with a long bedspread and no one will ever know you have a stash.
Thanks for the water suggestion! That's one I haven't considered and have taken advantage of in the past, and then there are the days where there are plumbing issues (🤬quest pipe!) and the water is shut off for hours. There have been some issues with water in the metro area as well, not necessarily supply, but broken mains or poor quality. The University always has water as a back up, but that would be a PITA to cross the main streets just to fill up a container and haul it back (my old boss wouldn't mind in the least bit though). Have a pretty extensive list of food stuffs, even longer now, and I also have a page dedicated to spices lol! I grew up enjoying time in the kitchen, so what the hay.

Crates sound like they will be invaluable for storage and bugging out if need be. Not only that it keeps my stuff organized and out of the way (SO IT WONT GET BUSTED), and those sound quite similar to what we have packed in the basement for when we did long road trips. One for the camping gear, one for cooking, a tool box, sporting goods, etc. Also, if I get suspicious of those who like to poke around, some I can add a lock to.

No worries about the guns and ammo, I believe here they cannot deny you from doing so (and I wouldn't follow the rules anyways, me being me) but I am leaning towards keeping anything large with the parents (say I score a SVT-40 with my C&R, bit long to discreetly carry in and out of a building). Handguns, PCCs, shotguns and some rifles probably wont be an issue. Don't see the need for a full arsenal, but I do like to have my stuff with me. At least enough for competitive shooting (networking), self defense, and the like. Hunting trips I save for with my dad, but a lot of things do have overlap if a spur of the moment trip came up. I have considered pulling the "law student" card and saying that I need secure storage for documents and evidence to see if that will let me get a safe in my walk in closet area (or bedroom, pending shelving).
 

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Regarding gasoline fueled camp stoves, would suggest you not use them as any gas fumes will be reported and you will have unwanted inspections or lease terminated. Chaffing fuel available at Sams is economical, you can find small stoves designed for chaffing fuel that will work great to heat up water for cooking or making coffee and other things. I have a couple of 12 pk cases of fuel on standby. There are Butane stoves that take butane canisters. Very handy to cook just about everything and that should be your first primary cooking means, the chaffing fuel is second. Denver gets cold so have appropriate bedding and possibly a back-up sleeping bag. Get one of those nice battery packs that can start your car or recharge your phones. Buy some of those LED lanterns as a backup, and spare batteries.
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Food is going to be a very important aspect and I would encourage thinking about having stuff that just requires heating rather than cooking. Canned beans, vegetables, Krogets brand Beef Stew, soups, crackers, tuna, Spam, oh yes a good hand powered can opener. What if your water is shut off and your toilets inop...buy a plastic bucket, a toilet seat for buckets, and plastic bags to line your bucket and to easily dispose of your waste. Lastly, get a decent sized wash basin in the event you need to shower or wash some clothes by hand and hang out on the balcony to dry.
 

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Take a couple of those crates (milk crates if possible) and store gallon jugs of water in them. Roam around the smaller stores and find the dried soup mixes ( we do this for the winter and the wife;s celiac mess) and buy some of those. More water makes soups, slightly less might make more of a stew. Cans of sterno will work for heating, especially if you find a small grill type screen off of a scrapped computer fan or something similar. 12 hour candles and put them in a can that has part of one side removed to reflect the light. Instant rice works also. Find a sleeping bag rated for really cold weather and add some wool and/or fleece blankets. For water if nothing else, look at your mouthwash bottles. Most of them are at least 1 quart bottles. rinse them out, fill them and stash them. Take your crates or even gallon buckets and use them as a bed frame, just put your box springs and mattress on top of them. Just going off the top of my head here and from what I read in stories. either way good luck.
 

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plus pay attention to the cook times of things.
minute rice costs more, but takes much less energy/time to cook.
i won't take any other kind on my back packing trips, i use the regular bulk stuff during normal at home times.
it'd surely suck to be looking at a shelf full of food and a trash can full of empty propane tanks.
 

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Thanks for the water suggestion! That's one I haven't considered and have taken advantage of in the past, and then there are the days where there are plumbing issues (🤬quest pipe!) and the water is shut off for hours. There have been some issues with water in the metro area as well, not necessarily supply, but broken mains or poor quality. The University always has water as a back up, but that would be a PITA to cross the main streets just to fill up a container and haul it back (my old boss wouldn't mind in the least bit though). Have a pretty extensive list of food stuffs, even longer now, and I also have a page dedicated to spices lol! I grew up enjoying time in the kitchen, so what the hay.

Crates sound like they will be invaluable for storage and bugging out if need be. Not only that it keeps my stuff organized and out of the way (SO IT WONT GET BUSTED), and those sound quite similar to what we have packed in the basement for when we did long road trips. One for the camping gear, one for cooking, a tool box, sporting goods, etc. Also, if I get suspicious of those who like to poke around, some I can add a lock to.

No worries about the guns and ammo, I believe here they cannot deny you from doing so (and I wouldn't follow the rules anyways, me being me) but I am leaning towards keeping anything large with the parents (say I score a SVT-40 with my C&R, bit long to discreetly carry in and out of a building). Handguns, PCCs, shotguns and some rifles probably wont be an issue. Don't see the need for a full arsenal, but I do like to have my stuff with me. At least enough for competitive shooting (networking), self defense, and the like. Hunting trips I save for with my dad, but a lot of things do have overlap if a spur of the moment trip came up. I have considered pulling the "law student" card and saying that I need secure storage for documents and evidence to see if that will let me get a safe in my walk in closet area (or bedroom, pending shelving).
This is a 41 inch gun case made for one AR 15. This one is $18 on line, but I have one that is dark earth that has straps like a backpack. You will need a guitar, just anything cheap will do, it is just for looks so people in your complex know you have a guitar. OK to leave in it view from outside, must be acoustic and cheap, you do not want anyone breaking in to steal it. Then you can come and go with your long gun without much attention. The second one is $46 on Amazon and has 6 pockets in it for storing ammo. I worked undercover several years and found things like this handy. You just need one that does not stand out and fits your personality. You can carry your long guns in and out in a duffle bag, but these cases are better. Part of prepping is making sure everybody and his brother does not know what you have.
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Good question! I unfortunately think it's electric. If that's the case I am definitely on the camp stove/grill wagon. We had an electric stove when I was little and that thing was a POS despite being well made by GE (I like GE and Maytag lol).For stoves, and I mentioned a Weber Q, I will need to look into a table that's not for entertainment use.

And thankfully I am not a picky eater! I have a list of ones to keep frozen, and also canned to keep on hand. Dried veggies, those I need to look for, those would be awesome even just for camping and doing, say a stir fry. Low sodium is good advice, I'm borderline on my blood pressure as it is so where I can take it out, or season up to my sweet spot that'll work wonders. I do that with the Campbells soups because I add in so many seasonings (tomato soup with smoked paprika, cayenne, garlic and onion power, OMG) anyways. 2 for 2 weeks, in case I have company :cool:😈, or I could also consider that 1 month for one person.

I love doing scrambles just like that! I also do quite a bit with a wok, but those can be time consuming/energy consuming. Cooler(s) suggestion is a fantastic idea!
Happy to help! You should be able to find dried veg on Amazon, as well as dried backpacking meals at saner prices than camping/outdoor stores and a bigger selection.

I went to low sodium cooking decades ago when I realized my mom would dump loads of salt on her food before trying it. You can bet that pissed me off to no end because I'd busted my butt to properly season the food I was serving. Now it's a matter of habit for most things and it's a good thing too, because Mom and I both have high blood pressure.
I've got an airtight plastic container/box full of the herbs and spices I use most that I keep in the pantry. It's all "back stock" so I'm not caught short if I'm cooking at home and I can just grab it when we go camping. You might want to consider doing the same for the same reasons. It makes life a lot easier.

The cooler and camp stove thing is something I've been doing that since I was a teen in CT. There were times when we lost power for 3-4 days in the winter so I'd empty the fridge into them, fill them up with snow and build a snow mound around the coolers just outside the back door. We kept a small propane grill and camp stove on a table on the screened in back porch so we had hot meals twice a day and Mom could have hot water for coffee.
 

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Thinking about my response today. Instead of spending money on gallon jugs of water at the store, round up 2 liter soda bottles if possible. Once you wash them out, fill them with water. Clean peanut butter jars and others like them will serve as storage for some items also. If nothing else find a dehydrator and dry your own stuff. Might be cheaper in the long run.
 

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you'd be surprised at what you can dry and store in a Jar.
mushrooms, apples, bell peppers, garlic, onions.
just dry them and run them through a cheap coffee grinder.
you can't just add a drop of water and have them come back, but you get the vitamins and flavor.
plus a small 12 oz. jar full of say garlic that's dried and ground is the equivalent of way over 100 cloves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Regarding gasoline fueled camp stoves, would suggest you not use them as any gas fumes will be reported and you will have unwanted inspections or lease terminated. Chaffing fuel available at Sams is economical, you can find small stoves designed for chaffing fuel that will work great to heat up water for cooking or making coffee and other things. I have a couple of 12 pk cases of fuel on standby. There are Butane stoves that take butane canisters. Very handy to cook just about everything and that should be your first primary cooking means, the chaffing fuel is second. Denver gets cold so have appropriate bedding and possibly a back-up sleeping bag. Get one of those nice battery packs that can start your car or recharge your phones. Buy some of those LED lanterns as a backup, and spare batteries.
View attachment 177629
Food is going to be a very important aspect and I would encourage thinking about having stuff that just requires heating rather than cooking. Canned beans, vegetables, Krogets brand Beef Stew, soups, crackers, tuna, Spam, oh yes a good hand powered can opener. What if your water is shut off and your toilets inop...buy a plastic bucket, a toilet seat for buckets, and plastic bags to line your bucket and to easily dispose of your waste. Lastly, get a decent sized wash basin in the event you need to shower or wash some clothes by hand and hang out on the balcony to dry.
That's a good point about the smell of the gas, but I'd all tell the neighbors if they gotta stuck their nose in my business so far that they can go something something themselves, and I'd fabricate something for whatever landlord. Chafing fuel is a new one on me. Seen it used, just have never used it myself. Butane would be awesome, imparts no flavor on my cigars should be wonderful for cooking!

We do tend to get cold, nothing unbearable but not comfort either. I do have a sleeping pad rated to -40 I'll be taking, and if I have my own camping equipment it'll be easy to have a variety of sleeping bags at the ready depending on the conditions. Batteries became so essential during the early days of the pandemic, plan on having a few Costco sized packs of every size in a container on hand. LED lamps, particularly with the lay out would be excellent! Candles for back up.

Ah, my ace bucket, 1000 uses and still counting!

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Take a couple of those crates (milk crates if possible) and store gallon jugs of water in them. Roam around the smaller stores and find the dried soup mixes ( we do this for the winter and the wife;s celiac mess) and buy some of those. More water makes soups, slightly less might make more of a stew. Cans of sterno will work for heating, especially if you find a small grill type screen off of a scrapped computer fan or something similar. 12 hour candles and put them in a can that has part of one side removed to reflect the light. Instant rice works also. Find a sleeping bag rated for really cold weather and add some wool and/or fleece blankets. For water if nothing else, look at your mouthwash bottles. Most of them are at least 1 quart bottles. rinse them out, fill them and stash them. Take your crates or even gallon buckets and use them as a bed frame, just put your box springs and mattress on top of them. Just going off the top of my head here and from what I read in stories. either way good luck.
Gallon jugs would be pretty easy to collect, even smaller ones. Milk, juice bottles, etc. Those would pack nice. Steno sounds like it'll be an invaluable thing to stash along with candles, as well as extra blankets!

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This is a 41 inch gun case made for one AR 15. This one is $18 on line, but I have one that is dark earth that has straps like a backpack. You will need a guitar, just anything cheap will do, it is just for looks so people in your complex know you have a guitar. OK to leave in it view from outside, must be acoustic and cheap, you do not want anyone breaking in to steal it. Then you can come and go with your long gun without much attention. The second one is $46 on Amazon and has 6 pockets in it for storing ammo. I worked undercover several years and found things like this handy. You just need one that does not stand out and fits your personality. You can carry your long guns in and out in a duffle bag, but these cases are better. Part of prepping is making sure everybody and his brother does not know what you have.
View attachment 177637

View attachment 177638
Those would be really handy, and being fairly familiar with both guitar and bass, they'd be totally incognito for a "lesson"!

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Happy to help! You should be able to find dried veg on Amazon, as well as dried backpacking meals at saner prices than camping/outdoor stores and a bigger selection.

I went to low sodium cooking decades ago when I realized my mom would dump loads of salt on her food before trying it. You can bet that pissed me off to no end because I'd busted my butt to properly season the food I was serving. Now it's a matter of habit for most things and it's a good thing too, because Mom and I both have high blood pressure.
I've got an airtight plastic container/box full of the herbs and spices I use most that I keep in the pantry. It's all "back stock" so I'm not caught short if I'm cooking at home and I can just grab it when we go camping. You might want to consider doing the same for the same reasons. It makes life a lot easier.

The cooler and camp stove thing is something I've been doing that since I was a teen in CT. There were times when we lost power for 3-4 days in the winter so I'd empty the fridge into them, fill them up with snow and build a snow mound around the coolers just outside the back door. We kept a small propane grill and camp stove on a table on the screened in back porch so we had hot meals twice a day and Mom could have hot water for coffee.
Great to read! Good to know about dried veggies on Amazon, I have so many little lists I'll start making another.

OMG, I noticed the same thing with my dad! But him and my grandmother (passed 2014) both have really low blood pressure. My mothers side, they/we all have high BP. I'm borderline, but high salt, I can feel the difference. I appreciate and love the classic weekend meals that have it, but glad it's not a daily habit. I'm big on the proper seasoning as well, my empanada are pretty low sodium FWIW (2 beef bullion cubes) but I basically have my own little Caribbean taco seasoning blend going on. People go nuts for them, and glad they love the real flavor vs just being baked salt bombs. Sounds like a great tip for herbs. Don't mind drying my own, but prolonging the shelf life sounds key! Our marjoram from last year is holding up well though.

Cooler and camp stove are wonderful ideas! Makes total sense how those ideas came to be. I like the idea for making room in the fridge/freezer to work on a big batch of stock (need to learn how to can/jar).

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