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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a rcbs powder measure scale maybe 8 or so years ago. I'm beginning to question accuracy of scale. I've looked on net trying to find which scale I have. It's not a model 505. The scale bar is round not flat. It has 3 measure clips pn bar. Anyone know which scale I have? I've lost instructions and need to make adjustment for correctness.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Will do. It has a wheel on left side of bar to make adjustments.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's not the flat bar but round. I took a 32 cal round nose weight 71 grn. I pit it on the scale and it read 72 grns. Sample I took a 30 cal carbine round (M1) and went to measure 15 grn IMR 4227 and it over flowed casing. I went to 14 grn 4227 and it improved voulum in case.
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It's not the flat bar but round. I took a 32 cal round nose weight 71 grn. I pit it on the scale and it read 72 grns. Sample I took a 30 cal carbine round (M1) and went to measure 15 grn IMR 4227 and it over flowed casing. I went to 14 grn 4227 and it improved voulum in case.....
That is an OLD scale, that predates MY experience with RCBS. However, I will make a couple points that are applicable to ALL manual bar scales: 1) A ONE GRAIN variance in a bullet of 70 +/- grains, is NOT unusual (within most MFR's tolerances). 2) Zeroing a balance beam scale is pretty simple, and basically the same procedure for ALL brands and models. 3) The thread I posted talked about cleaning the pivot points of the balance beam, to clear up any "sluggish" reactions in the scale's function.

Since your scale is indeed an older model, it is not unexpected that there may be "gunk" in the pivot points, or they may even be damaged. You would need to remove the round beam from the frame, and examine the contact points under a magnifying glass, to determine if dirty or damaged, or both.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
After I posted, running errands, came back home, went back to it and working on some 45 acp, dropped a round and it landed on a router table and round some how made it under rag. pulled the rag out and lord and behold there was to paper manual. Sure enough it is a RC130. Was able to zero it. Thanks.
 

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time to clean [and not oil it]
that dust is enough to mess with it.
wipe it all down.
double check the grooves and blades edges making sure they are spotless.
make sure the blades have no nicks.

then find a level [both directions] spot on your bench and put the level there.
draw an outline of the scale.
take a drill bit and make a small divot where the adjuster rod sits and put it in there.
now adjust for level.

I put my scale in place after making the divot then put an extra screw down to slide the edge of the scale in place.
now all I have to do is keep it clean.
a small clear cover helps me do that, and provides a little protection from dropped stuff [like a size die]
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The first scale I had was a RCBS I bought back around 1975. Put a lot of miles on it. It broke down when the plastic pieces the cradle rest on broke. On this forum I learned not to oil cradle. I cleaned the pivot rest on this RC130 today.
 
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