Recently Purchased A Used Smith&Wesson Revolver.

Discussion in 'Smith & Wesson' started by Ballbearing, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. Ballbearing

    Ballbearing G&G Evangelist

    It's a model 64 stainless 4" square butt with wooden service stocks in .38 special. Overall it looks good, especially after I cleaned it. Apparrently, it's an ex-Detroit police service revolver as it has "Detroit Police" stamped into the backstrap, however I can't verify that as it came with no documentation. It isn't all that big, but it has a nice rugged, utilitarian look to it. I have no idea how old it is and I really would like to know. Everything appears to be in good shape but since it's been a service revolver, I imagine it's been shot quite a bit. The revolver's innards look especially good although the gun has definitely been carried some as the outside is somewhat weathered, although surprisingly not a great deal, it just has what I like to call "a bit of character". How can I find out how old it is, and whether or not it is capable of shooting +P ammo or not?
     
  2. whirlwind

    whirlwind G&G Enthusiast

    i dont know for sure,but ive been told all older smith 38s will eat +p's. i know my uncle had a model 10 police and he always shot +p's and man that was centuries ago,back when he could see! lol id love to find an old #10 someday to go with my model 13...great find man! take care of her.
     

  3. Hammer Down

    Hammer Down G&G Addict

    713
    5

    Hello
    I woluld assume your model 64 is a Model 64-5 stamped into the crane area. These were made for the Detroit Police and stamped as such in 1988. If you dash number is lower it will have the Tapered barrel not the heavy style barrel's that were issued on the Model 64-5's in 1988. These were a stainless version of the previous model 10 or more Often called an M&P revolver. They are built on the K-Frame and have a square or round butt depending on dash numbers of them. They will handle any Plus-P ammo you wish to feed them. I hope this helps, Hammerdown
     
  4. Ballbearing

    Ballbearing G&G Evangelist

    As it just so happens, it IS a 64-5! Are you a wizard or something? I checked the frame on the inside of the crane and whaddaya know 64-5 sure as shootin'! It does have the heavy barrel and it locks up tight. When I got it home it needed some serious cleaning, in fact after working on it for several hours last night, I think before I shoot it, I'll clean it again. Whoever had it before me cleaned the bore and kept it wiped down on the outside but the inside of the frame above and below and the face of the cylinder were covered in layers of carbon, and there are still some spots I'd like to work on some more. But thank you guys for your help, especially you Hammer Down. I don't just have a gun that could have been an old cop gun, I have a gun that's a real old cop gun! I did once own a Victory Model but I never fired +P's out of it, and since this one is also a K-frame, I thought I'd ask someone in the know before I did so, even though this revolver was manufactured much, much later than the Victory.
     
  5. Hammer Down

    Hammer Down G&G Addict

    713
    5
    Hello Ball Bearing
    The easiest way to clean up that Stainless gun is to use a 3-M Green Scotch brite scouring Pad found in Grocery stores in the cleabing aisle. It will remove all the Carbon and Donut Glaze. :cop: The Pad is Thin enough to fit between the forcing cone and top strap of the revolver. It also will give you the factory look of that stainless if it is rubbed along the length of it. I have one Cop Gun in .32 S&W Long Caliber shown below that was owned and carried by Harry Anderson the Evansville, Indiana Police Chief on his Motorcycle back on 1927....
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. billy

    billy G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

  7. grizcty

    grizcty God, Guns, Glory Forum Contributor


    Thanks for the info, & pictures.
     
  8. SwedeSteve

    SwedeSteve Freedom Zealot Forum Contributor

    Interesting story !!
     
  9. Ballbearing

    Ballbearing G&G Evangelist

    That's one handsome firearm you have there Hammer Down. And in incredible shape for it's age. I've read that .32's were popular with police officers from about 1900 to the 1930's when criminals such as John Dillinger and George "Baby-Face" Nelson, Bonnie and Clyde and Alvin Karpis began upping the ante' with bullet proof vests and heavy weapons like the B.A.R. and Thompson sub-machine guns. Several policemen and federal agents were killed prompting a re-thinking in many departments about the effectiveness of small caliber revolvers. Many officers began carrying larger caliber weapons in calibers such as .38 special, .45 (A.C.P and Long Colt), .41 Long Colt and .44 special. It wasn't too long after that, that the S&W N-framed .38-44's came along, eventually leading to the development of the .357 magnum. I remember when I was a kid I'd see most policemen and sheriff's deputies carrying revolvers, automatics weren't seen very often until the 1980's, then they started really taking over and revolvers were seen less and less frequently, at least it was that way in my neck of the woods. Nowadays, you rarely see anything but a polymer framed auto on an officers hip, although I have spied a 1911 or two, a few Beretta's, and our Highway Patrol seem to have a penchant for Sigs. But by and large, the ubiquitous Glock rules the roost in cop's holsters now.
     
  10. Hammer Down

    Hammer Down G&G Addict

    713
    5



    Hello Ball Bearing
    In 1935 S&W rocked the shooting world with the release of their Famous .357 Magnum Revolver. It was the brain child of Joseph Wesson and was a custom Hand built customer ordered revolver. Wesson was a hunter at heart and wanted a revolver that would drop any Big Game animal in North America and the .357 Magnum was just that. It's early stages of development came into Play due to Philip Sharp the famed hand loader and cartridge wildcatter from California. He worked closely with Elmer Keith on the special beveled bullet design to withstand the new Higher pressures of this round. Winchester arms agreed to build the round and sell it publicly if Wesson provided them with a firearm to shoot it in so a Modified 38-44 Outdoorsman revolver with a special heat treated cylinder and frame was sent to Winchester Arms for testing the round while Wesson perfected the .357 revolver to fire it with a team of gun smiths he selected to build them in the factory and the registered Magnum was built. It allowed the customer to order this gun with any barrel length from 3-1/2"-8-3/4" in length and seven different sight configurations, and had a cross hatch checking pattern on their top strap to eliminate glare.






    It could have been ordered in Blue or nickel finish and each customer was sent a registration card when the gun was shipped to be filled out & sent back to the factory for the registration process. The First year they were offered they got off to a slow start with only 720 of them being made as they were pricey back then at $61.00 a Piece. Many went to Important figures as the first one being sent to J. Edgar Hoover the Famed F.B.I. Agent and another to general George Patton. They continued to offer the Registered Magnum until Late 1938 when S&W decided to stop the Registration process and make the gun a standard catalog offering due to high volume sales. It did not take long for Law Enforcement to see how Powerful this revolver really was so many were shipped to agencies and the F.B.I. as time wore on. They Halted production of them in 1939 for the World War II effort and came back out with them in Post War times and those were called Non Registered Magnums when in 1950 they renamed them the model of 1950 .357 Magnum's and in 1957 They stamped a model number in the crane area of them which was the model 27 being the most elaborate revolver S&W ever made. Below is my First Year Registered Magnum made in 1935 that shipped To The Bowen Brother's Hardware Company in Augusta, Georgia in December 1935 and is close to the last 100 they made that year.. It is shown with a set of period Correct Walter Roper Custom shooting grips of which Roper made for the Camp perry shooting Teams back then...






    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Ballbearing

    Ballbearing G&G Evangelist

    Another beautiful antique revolver! How in the world do you keep them so pristine perfect? Now that's what I call a classic!
     
  12. smithp67

    smithp67 G&G Newbie

    1
    0
    Detroit PD 38

    Hi,

    Do you mind saying where you purchased the 38 and if they had several? I am from Michigan and would like to have an old Detroit service revolver.

    Thanks for any info.

    Phil
     
  13. Ballbearing

    Ballbearing G&G Evangelist

    Unfortunately, I purchased it far away from Michigan, in a pawn shop and there was only the one. The proprietor said some fellow had sold it and he had waited the proper time to clear it for sale, and it had been in the case less than half an hour when I walked in, picked it up and bought it on sight. It's now one of my favorites, even though it has some character and has seen some miles, it's still a great little shootin' iron. I never did change the grips. The old walnut service stocks just seem to belong there somehow. I wish you luck in your search however. If I were you, I'd want one of these little jewels too.