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Question to all you reloaders out there:
I got my RCBS press and some components but was wondering something not mentioned in the manual. Does it matter what brand of brass casings you use? I would think it does but I can not find it written anywhere.
thanks!
 

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for plinking ammo, brand of brass isnt really an issue. now for best accuracy, or maximum loads you want to use 1 brand, and 1 lot of that brand. volume differences between lots, and different brands affect accuracy and pressures.
 

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The reloading manual you use will have the Type of primer, the Case used, and other pertinent Info. you should follow when duplicating the load you want...
I use Remington, Winchester, Federal, and Norma Brass.
Rich
 

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Please keep in mind if your using a military caliber ie. 223. 308. The case capacity can be less due to the brass being thicker. So, if your loading 40 grains of your favorite powder in a Winchester case, it may act like it has more in a LC (lake City) case. Safety factors are pressure considerations. Worst case you shoot the mil mixed with the commercial and end up with not so good groups.
 

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I agree with LeftyO about brand but when mixing them,will weigh them on scale and get the ones that weigh the closest in one lot.That way they will shoot closer togather in fps and when using the haevier ones I may have to adjust the sights just a little.I always seperate military from civ.mfg. and reduce gharge except .223 which I find no difference in unless foreign made.Even then 1/2gr is sufficient reduction in mil.. sam.
 

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"...Does it matter what brand of brass casings you use?..." Nope. Mind you, benchrest shooters will weight every case and keep the like weights separate. Benchrest shooters will also weigh each bullet, primer along with the powder charge. They'll also pay close attention to the powder lot.
They're a daft bunch, but without them we wouldn't have the selection or quality of reloading components we have. A lot of 'normal' cartridges we get to play with wouldn't be around either
You don't need to use bench rest techniques to load good ammo. Meticulous loading techniques using any brass will produce good ammo. Weighing each charge with match grade bullets and using a single stage press will produce match grade ammo.
Absolutely top notch match grade ammo requires near bench rest techniques though.
Ammo for just shooting for fun doesn't. Nor does pistol shooting games ammo.
 
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