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I think I know the answer to this, but here it goes anyway....

Is milsurp ammo reloadable? Using a flashlight, I've seen the two non-standard holes in the primer on the inside of the shell case at the bottom.

I've heard the primers are hard to knock out, and the primer pocket does not allow modern primer insertion. True?

Maybe I shouldn't be saving all the brass...
 

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It can be done, but it probably isn't worth it unless you do that sort of thing for fun.

Look up Berdan primers on google; Wikipedia has a pretty good article on the difference between Berdan and Boxer.

The main difference is that you can't punch the Berdan primer out with a metal rod like you can the Boxer. One common way instead is to use hydraulic pressure by filling the casing with water, inserting a tight-fitting rod into the mouth of the casing, and smacking it one. The Berdan primers also aren't as readily available, at least here in the States.

Some guys convert the casings so they can use Boxer primers instead. I think that mostly involves just drilling out the bottom of the pocket (where the two holes are), but don't take my word for it; I've never done it.
 

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That, and price. Unless you have a specific bullet or powder you really want to use, I think you're gonna have a hard time reloading for the same cost. (even more so when your consider time).
I just bought a bunch of MN ammo for $37.95 for 440 rounds. That's pretty cheap shootin'..
 

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You really can't reload berdan primed cases for the same price as buying milsurp ammo. I know it sounds tempting, I personally have about 2000 cases lying around that I'm saving for either scrap metal or when the going gets tough, but it is a royal pain to get a berdan primer out and in again.
 

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That, and price. Unless you have a specific bullet or powder you really want to use, I think you're gonna have a hard time reloading for the same cost. (even more so when your consider time).
I just bought a bunch of MN ammo for $37.95 for 440 rounds. That's pretty cheap shootin'..
With the current prices I can reload for considerably less than commercial or most surplus ammo.

When you reload throw your time 'worth' out the window. Ninety nine percent of reloaders do it for fun, for savings, and for a more accurate ammo.

With reloading component prices expected to rise sharply due to Democratic controls a monetary saving may go by the wayside.

I bought a batch of bullets from Hi-tech Ammo and (speaking with them personally) they said the advertised cost in Shotgun News had ALREADY risen due to copper prices.

I've had reputable acquantances, who own gun shops, tell me that after January 1 watch those prices go through the ceiling. And that will be on everything gun related.

But for now, and in the past, a reloader could save quite a bit of money reloading 'rolling their own'.
 

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It can be done. It has been years but I have or had a device to get the primers out. I have a bunch of brass which has the primers out and still have the two holes. I was looking for some 30 carbine brass in my stash and came across a bunch of 223 which I had taken the primers out. After you have got the primers out you have to ream the cup where the new primers go as the mil brass was never meant to be reloaded and as I recall the cup has a slight bevel the civilian does not have. You can get a reamer and just sit and watch tv and prep the primer pockets. If you wanted to I guess you could drill out the cup. I have shot a bunch or 223 mil which I reloaded. I had an old lyman reloading manual (probably older than I am) which told you every thing to do. I would bet a sizable sum of money that the cheap reloads you buy started life as mil brass. If you buy a bunch on ebay make sure they are or are not mil. The mil will bring a lot less. The cheapest way for you to accumulate reloadable brass is either ebay or buy a bunch of the cheapest ammo you can buy, shoot it and then you will have the brass.

Milton Edens
 

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You can do it. Years ago I did. I was looking for some 30 carb in my stash and came across a bunch of 223 with primers removed and nothing done to the primer cup. You will have to ream the primer cup as the mil have a bevel which prevents them form accepting a primer. This is a nothing piece of work. I had an old lyman manual (probably older than me) which told you all the steps. I have shot a lot of mil 223 I reloaded.

Try a short primer "rod??" and get on the press and see what happens.

The cheapest way for you to accumulate a bunch of brass is ebay or buy a bunch of the cheapest stuff you can buy, shoot it and use the brass. The cheap stuff brass started life as mil brass any way.

Note that in most calibers mil brass is thicker than civilian brass. This is good and bad. Start your loading with about a grain to two grains below the 10% most books reccommend, shoot a few and then work up to heavier loads. The good is that you will probably never live long enough to even have to trim the mil brass and unless you are a real young pup you will never load it enough to ever have to throw it away.

Weigh the cases to determine what you have even if you bought low cost ammo to start with.

If I come across my book I will post and get the info to you.

yorkieshome
 
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