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Ive always been very intrigued by re-loading, but I dont know squat about it, most of my gear is 7.62x39, 7.62x54, 223 or 8mm, for just plinking. I will usually pay the buck 50 a round hornady for my 7mmag, and the 300 savage, I dont know where to begin, I know im getting tired of the cost of 7mmag and 300 savage, also even 30-30 is becoming expensive, but how do I break into re-loading and what do I really need? its another jungle, is it cost effective? thanks, also I use my sporting rifles strictly for hunting, not impressing people, but just good solid shots on game, after I get a good sight picture
 

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Reloading is not all that difficult, and once you start it will grab you too.
Get some reloading books, and read up on it some, I started with and still have the lee starter set, I think I got it for around $100.00 and it had everything you need to start excluding dies, polisher and a few other odds and ends.

Take a look:
http://www.leeprecision.com/catalog/browse.cgi?1005369969.1508=anivers.html

As far as cost, It can save you money, but I see it as more control over each shot.
 

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RCBS has a "starter kit" with press scale and other stuff thats pretty cheap! i have never bought one because my dad gave me an old pacific press before he passed on,but i only buy RCBS dies and they have very good equipment! the kit also comes with instructions for getting started. if i hadnt had a press already thats the way i would have went . i cant remember the price right now but do a google for "RCBS RELOADING EQUIPMENT" and youll find all ya need. and reloading can be cheaper than factory but it can also be more expensive! it depends on the quality of the round you want to make. some of my 30.06 loads for target shooting only cost about as much as you pay for your 7mm mag rounds. but those are made with high $ sierra match grade bullets. hunting and plinking is way cheaper with reloads! for instance a box of 20 rounds for my 41 rem mag cost about 20 bucks from the factory! but i can reload em for between 0.6 and 15 cents per round!
 

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Started with an RCBS "starter kit" besides dies and a couple of extras (stuck case remover, trickler, case trimmers, tumbler) Iv'e been running stock for 14 years.

I don't think there is a bad brand out there. The quality control and customer service is good in this industry from what Iv'e seen anyway. Lee Starter kit would be good too.

Even if you decide to g progressive in the future, the tools in the starter kit are still usefull.

With the starter kits you may end up spending an extra 100~150 yet if you go with some of the options mentioned above.
 

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7mm I started with the Lee stuff as well....Also need to add in the cost of primers, powder, bullets and brass (if you have not been saveing it).....Ive been at it about 3 moths ish....fairly simple process.....My problem has been more addiing dies and accessories that run the cost up...My goal is to have the dies to reload every calaber ...except 7.62x39...cant beat the USSR price. I started by reading the LEE reloading manual...others are also good....the saveings of $$ depend on the cost of factory ammo....I save big time on the 458mag (Factory ammo is $2 a round reloads with hollow points is .30ccents)...for the 9mm handgun factory plinking ammo is only $11 per hundered...(wal mart winchester brand)....reloading with commerical cast bullets is $6 per 100 and home castdrops to $3 per 100.
With reloading the saveing come from you being the labor ....factory's pay people to make their stuff....you take the same componets and you are the labor.
My inital reloads have not ben the tack driveing 1/4 inch groups at 1000 yards I dreamed of while waiting on my first kit to arrive :)....but as good as factory (most of the time).... What I do like is I can make my loads the way I want them....LIGHT too super heavy....so for the 300mag you can make light plinking loads that have a lot less recoil.....or go super heavy if you enjoy pain. The same with bullets you use..can try a lot of diffrent types based on what you want..from Match grade to cast lead...and the cost is about the same....I've been loading HP bullets for the 45/70 and 458 because I shoot soda cans....
 

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7mm when I started about 10 years ago I picked up an RCBS Partner press kit it came with everything I needed except the dies. For dies if you are beginning go with the Lee's they are good quality and they last a long time. You mentioned 223 - just a tip spend the extra and go RCBS on these when you order get the "SMALL BASE" dies. I have found these are required for most auto loaders.

My current recommendation for new reloaders is the Lee anniversary kit they run about 80 if you shop and contain everything you should need less the dies.

Just a warning -- reloading is addictive. You will find yourself in the winter months loading ammo and loading ammo and loading ammo. Before long you will be like me with a minimum of 1000 rounds for every gun.

come over to the hand loading forum when you are ready and we can help with loading data
 

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I also recommend the Lee Challenger Anniversary Kit. You will still use everything that came with the kit, no matter what you decide later. Progressives are not practical for loading small amounts of rifle ammunition, because of the cost of the shellplates and/or tool heads. Switching over to certain calibers on the Dillon costs more than many single stage presses. A few years back, I bought the Lee kit, thinking I might "upgrade" later. I still haven't found a real need to do so.
 

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7MM,
The Lee kit is a good place to start and maybe all you'll ever need. My recomendation would be to read everything you can get your hands on about reloading. Then sort the wheat from the chaff. Not all writers agree on everything, but it's good to know both opinions. I've been reloading for 35 years now and I'm still learning new tricks. One thing I've always tried to do was keep a crossection of up-to date loading manuals on hand to compare loads.

The weakest link of the Lee kit is the manual. Richard Lee put a lot of ideas in the book to help sell his dies and equipment ignoring established practices. The load data is fine just the selfserving how-to section is suspect. I have and use a lot of Lee stuff I just don't buy all the hype in the book.
 

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I also have the Anniversary kit and I really like it. I didnt like the hand held primer tool though. After seating the primers on a bunch of rounds it can get tiring. I got the Auto Prime II that uses the press to seat them. Much easier and faster.
I dont think it can be beat for the money.
I like the fact that I can neck size only and that did more to improve accuracy than anything. I'm still experimenting and they just keep getting better.
Shauns warning is correct! Its been a little cold to go to the range so I've been loading every empty case I can find! Come spring time I should have enough ammo loaded to last the year
 

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All great ideas, 7MM.

I bought all my stuff piece mealed.

I've got RCBS stuff, Lee stuff, Lymans tuff, Hornady stuff, and stuff I'm not sure who made it.

But, regardless, I get the job done and I thoroughly love reloading, 7MM.....you would too!

There is some stuff I reload that I really don't save much doing myself but I really, really like putting something out that I did with my own hands.

I think the most important thing is to get two-three- or more top reloading manuals and read, read, read.

I must confess, to me, some of the stuff in the manuals about velocities, trajectgories, etc. is like reading a medical text book. But 90 per cent of it is apllicable to the average dummy, like me.

Step in, 7MM....get yer feet wet and you'll want to jump in.
 
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