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Awhile back, I ran across an old 16 gauge shotgun that had been taken apart in an effort to repair it and I was offered the chance to either buy it or simply attempt to get it back together. Actually, the gun hadn't been broken as badly as it seems and the two long arms that extend from the back of the bolt into the return spring assembly had been bent slightly and came out of place. So, I after a night of straightening up the bent parts and figuring out how to get the gun back together, I had a gun that was nearly operable but took it home to make sure.

I did later pay for the gun after deciding to buy it for myself for $100 and felt this would be a neat project. The smooth bore of the shotgun was nearly flawless and most of the parts seemed to be in pretty good condition aside from some tarnish and having not been cleaned in a long time. The bluing is really decent, although very light surface rust had begun to form on the right side of the receiver which is mostly eliminated after rubbing the gun over in a light coat of oil. The stocks had been badly scratched and the finish had been knocked off in several places so I decided to refinish them in a much more attractive red oak stain and glossy polyurethane.

I still haven't had a chance to shoot this gun but I'm very pleased with the way it's turned out and I feel lucky to have found it when I did. I'd always liked the idea of having a 16 gauge and interesting enough, this gun marks the 16th firearm in my current collection. It's an odd and very random deviation from my normal pile of surplus rifles but I'm glad that I finally have a good old semi-automatic sporting gun like this one.

ImageShack - Hosting :: remington1148bs3.jpg

If that works, it should be a link to the most recent photo of the gun as it is after my little restoration. The most interesting thing for me about this gun is the action which is a long-recoil type in which the barrel actually moves back almost the length of the shell and then returns forward, followed shortly by the bolt. This gun has a large return spring for the barrel mounted around the magazine tube along with a brass friction ring which can be positioned in different ways to allow the gun to cycle using different loads. Right now, all I have is an ounce of 8 shot which I'd consider a lighter load. I have it set up with the brass ring in front of the recoil spring assembly with the beveled end forward at the moment. Does that sound right?

So, as I have little exprience with a shotgun like this, I'd welcome any experiences and advice regarding them. Thanks!
 

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Since 03-15- 2002
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very nice. welcome to the wonderfull world of the 16ga fan. You will love the way it shoots. Now go buy a bunch of 16ga shells to support the cause.

BTW, my 16 is a Remingtom Model 31 Pump
 

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I can justify anything.
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I have the same shotgun in 20 ga. Remington 11-48. Old world craftsmanship.

Same here.. 26" IMP choke, and it's never missed a beat as long as I've owned it, for 12 years... It's my ol' standby shotgun, as long as I'm shooting shot.. For some reason, it throws slugs 3' high and 1' to the right at 100 yards, every time... So I don't use it for slugs.. :)
 

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Good job Agent. the old 11-48s are becoming collector items especially in 20, 410 and the rarest the 28ga. Just look on gunbroker some time. I have a 12 and a 20. My 12 ga is a great trap gun.
 

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Wonderment :)
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1148 schematic

Numrich Gun Parts corp. has 'drawings, breakdown, schematics for the 1148
 

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This shotgun was made in 3 variations, Rem. 11-48, 48 Sportsman & 48 Mohawk. I have one 11-48 and two 48 Sportsman, all in 16 gauge. The difference between the 11-48 and 48 Sportsman is magazine capicity. The 48 Sportsman only hold 2 in the magazine, nice no need for a plug. The 48 Mohawk was the same as the Sportsman except it has a hardwood stock rather than walnut. I'm a big fan of the 16 and these Rem. were built on thier own frame and not a 12 ga. one. I find them to be a great shotgun. I also have a Belgin Browning Sweet 16 and all the Rems. are several ounces lighter, will have to reweigh them and see just how much lighter.
 
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