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Hello. I have been looking at remington's 710. Particularly the 270. What do you think about the remington 710? Is it a good accurate gun? How does it perform? :feedback:
 

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What is so bad about it? I have read lots of bad stuff about it (like what people think of it) but none of them said why they didnt like it. The reason i am wanting to know is that i'm probably gonna get a new rifle soon. I was looking at the NEF in 270 and the remington 710 in 270. Which one do you think is better? Which one is more accurate? Thanks in advance
 

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I think that there is no question in saying the NEF is a better gun. What it comes down to is quality. They put on a very cheap stock, the bolt feels like it was made with sand when you run it. They had accuracy and mechanical problems from day one.
 

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I've held a 710 before and something just wasn't right. The bolt was a pain to operate, and the stock felt like it was going to fall apart in my hands. When I gripped the end of the stock tightly, it actually compressed toward the barrel, touching the barrel at one spot...very bizarre.

NEF makes an awesome rifle. Also, if you save up a bit more, look at the Remington 700 SPS rifles. They're only a bit more than the 710, and a ton better.
 

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I tell Ya,Never in my life I'd thought I'd ever agree with lefty o,but he knows his guns I see.The 710 Remington is in left O's words {junk},and it is.
 

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I've held a 710 before and something just wasn't right. The bolt was a pain to operate, and the stock felt like it was going to fall apart in my hands. When I gripped the end of the stock tightly, it actually compressed toward the barrel, touching the barrel at one spot...very bizarre.
What do you have giant monkey hands or something?

I have no idea what kind of 710 you were "compressing" but I Own one and it's a fine 30.06, I still have yet to sight it in properly but a great light firearm none the less..and way less weight than My Winchester 30.06..way less.

My bolt is as smooth as many things are, such as Vaseline on a Ducks back..
 

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Lol, nah. What I was trying to get at was the stock on the one that I held seemed soft...it was really weird.

Remington does make very good rifles, and you probably do have a good gun there. I think the majority of the 710's are average though. No matter what though, the gun will go bang and probably be pretty accurate, but it might be worth considering upgrading to the 700 or to a Savage.
 

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Here's my opinion of the Rem 710 vs Rem 700, in terms of the hunting and shooting styles that favor each one:

Rem 710 - you buy it in a package at your favorite chain sporting goods store, clean the bore, and go straight to the range. Within a few shots you're dialed in and ready for hunting season, with a likely accuracy of 1.5moa. The stock is really easy to get used to. Very standard and comfortable in its ergonomics. You manage to get caught on every branch and thornbush out there. You get torn to kingdom come and don't notice that your 710 doesn't show a scratch. In your exhaustion, you lose your footing, and fall down a hillside with your 710. You brush it off as best you can, check the bore for obstructions, and keep going. Then you see a deer. You get your shot all carefully aimed, pull the trigger, and convert to an open circulatory system from the scope because you got too friendly with it and the gun was lighter than you're used to. As you apply pressure to your forehead wound and try to get your bearings, you find that you downed your deer cleanly. When telling your exaggerated hunting story without referencing your gun, your friends spot your 710 in the corner, and make a comment on your clean new rifle that clearly hasn't seen a trip to the field, much less your recent hunting adventure.

Rem 700 - you know exactly what cartridge and model combination you want, but Remington doesn't offer it, even though it's the most sensible choice. But you finally decide a Rem 700 is what you want for its tradeoffs against Savage, Ruger, Weatherby, CZ, Mossberg, and such. You then shop forever for a scope that's exactly half the value of the gun, because that's the rule of thumb you go by. Finally you cave in and buy a scope that isn't exactly half the price of your 700 but is actually something you want and a good deal. Then you buy at least two different kinds of scope mounts, whether high rise or base&rings. Gotta cover all the possibilities, you know. Then you buy a boresighter to site in the scope. Your boresighter doesn't work worth squat, so you end up shooting, adjusting, and eventually remounting the scope to finally get it on target. Your groups may or may not be sub-moa. You don't feel confident enough with your new setup to hunt with it, so you carry your dad's 30-30, your Mosin, or some other less elite rifle. Over the next year you practice enough with your 700 to use it confidently, but then you bang your scope on the trail and worry that it may be off. Then you see a deer. You shoot and aren't sure you hit it, so you rapidly reload and aim your next shot. You shoot again and very noticeably flinch, taking an owl out of a nearby tree. Your deer then falls down dead. Turns out you made a clean kill shot, but the animal was high on that new "deer crack" sold in sporting goods stores and couldn't feel any pain until it bled to death. You start to dress the deer and then find rust already appearing on your 700. You forget entirely about the deer and start frantically trying to stop it from spreading. By the time you give up, you turn around to find a bear eating your deer.
 

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Bahahahha..good story..

+1
 

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LOL...that was pretty good :09:

Like I said before, I love...LOVE Remington firearms. I own 5 of them now. There are 2 guns that I don't care for. 1 is the 7400, the other is the 710. I own the 7400, and as much as I hate it, I wouldn't sell it.

Without a doubt, the 710 will go bang when you shoot it, and will hit where you aim it. I just think the 700 is built from better parts.

BRG3, your comment about the limited calibers in the 700 used to be very true. Now that they have the SPS line though, they seem to have eliminated that issue.

Also, as far as I know, Remington has done away with the 710, and introduced the 770 (which is essentially the same rifle): Remington Model 770™ Specifications

You mentioned limited calibers on the 700...this gun is even worse :sad2:

But I actually like the look of the 770...and if the stock is any better, I might actually get one in 30-06. I could always use another Remington :D
 

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I suspect they came out with the 770 because people caught on to the 710. If you look around right now, you can find a lot of Remington ADL's at a good price, you would be better off with one of those.
 

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The thing with Remington caliber choices is that they don't pair the right calibers with the right models. I have yet to see an SPS or heavy barrel version in Remington's own 260. And they wonder why it didn't catch on. I would have loved to buy a basic rifle in that cartridge, not something high grade like the M7 or one of their super lightweight models. And they make a cartridge with extreme accuracy potential but fail to chamber it in a heavy barrel. So my 6.5 cal is a Howa in the Swede cartridge, and my M700 heavy barrel SPS varmint is in 308, a caliber Remington does not have their name and a general monopoly on.
 

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I was in our Wal Mart yesterday and made my way over to sporting goods.
When I got there the 2 guys working the dept. Had a model 770 out spraying the bolt with Break Free and I said to them that ain't gonna help !
And they turned and said to me this is a piece of Sh--T !
Then one of them handed it to me. I found it to be a very good looking rifle, I gave the stock the Charmin test and it was solid.
But working the bolt was nasty, very bad. I hope Remington gets the bugs out because as far as eye appeal I like the style...A.H
 

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Hi Shooters,
Yep, I'm new here... first post, (added later...long post too, Sorry....)

Just wanted to comment on the Remington 710. By accident I accompanied my wife to Wal-mart for some birthday cards. I visited a friend in the sporting goods dept while Momma did her thing.
He, knowing I'm a gunsmith asked if I'd ever worked on a Remington 710. I had not, but he handed me one in .243 Win, telling me it had been sent out for repairs twice. Problem was the bolt was horribly stiff to close. The store had marked the gun down to a ridiculously low price selling the piece "as is". So I bought the gun. I disassembled the rifle and checked it over. I immediately spotted the problem and fixed it in less than half an hour. The cocking cam and its centering notch were galling due to a rough finish with tool marks. Machining had left sharp edges on the sear and rear of bolt body. A few minutes with a medium Arkansas stone cured the galling but still the bolt was rather stiff. A coating of Lubriplate laced with diamond dust and about a hundred cycles of the bolt cured 95 percent of the stiffness and shooting a few rounds will finish breaking in the gun. After a thorough cleaning and a light coat of Gold Gun Grease I test fired the gun with loose Remington .243s from a "catch all" can on the loading bench. Since it was 107 outside I shot out of the shop bathroom window using the sill as a rest. The Bushnell scope on the rifle was as it came from Remington I didn't touch it. I fired five rounds at paper plate stapled to a Hickory at about 60 yds. The group almost missed the plate to the left but I was surprised it was just over an inch spread. Now, this isn't a brag on my markmanship, I was down on one knee resting the forearm on my hand on the window sill. Not a real good bench rest. I'm confident the gun will shoot as good or better than any 700 or Model 70 I ever owned.

If it's worth reading, let me tell you what I see in this rifle. First it's designed for ease of manufacture. Just as the 700 eliminated dozens of milling cuts used on Mauser actions, the 710 eliminates several steps used in making a 700. A recoil lug is not used. Instead two front action screws mate tightly with two crosswise recoil lugs built into the stock. A smaller third screw holds the rear tang to the stock. The major change found in 710 is the non-standard locking system. The barrel, may not be threaded, I suspect its not but is a press fit into the action ring, the barrel extends completely through the action ring ending just forward of the magazine cutout. This allows the locking lugs on the bolt head to cam directly into the back of the barrel. The complete cartridge is enclosed in this style breech. This is very similar to the breech of the M99 Japanese military rifle from WWII. On the Jap the bolt head enters the back of the barrel about 3/16" but the lugs lock into the receiver, the cartridge head is still completely enclosed..save the extractor cut, which leaves a small portion of he case head exposed. If anyone isn't up on the Jap's legendary strength. Read Poppa Ackley's blowup tests of actions. The Jap was the strongest action he tested. Granted he tested a M38 but it is quite similar to the M99.
So for you who call the 710 junk, you might want to look closer at the rifle. I'll stick my neck out and say it's probably one of the safest action designs available at any price. I'm speaking of its design and not its mass. Of course, bigger thicker receivers and barrels will be stronger but they are heavier and bulkier too.
The 710 has a well designed bolt guide on the left side of the action. This slicked up with the diamond dust and now the bolt feels like its running on ball bearings without any sloppiness at all.
The stock on the 710 is about like many of the synthetic after market stocks being sold now days. Its light and has a good non-slip feel. I can't feel any softness or give in the forearm as mentioned on this thread. I do hope they used a better recoil pad on the magnums but the .243's recoil in this stock is more like a corkgun.
For an inexpensive rifle the 710 has a good trigger. and if I'm not mistaken it's adjustable... (didn't have my glasses on putting it back together but think I seen adj.screws). I found it crisp with a tiny bit of creep which I like, after all I've been building rifles from Mausers, 03s and U.S.Enfields for near half a century.
Here in the south and out west many a rancher or farmer and their hired hands put a rifle in a truck and never take it out, they don't need or want a 1000 dollar rifle. As long as they can hit a predator and the gun functions well they are happy. Where guns are carried daily they are just tools and are not taken care of very well. The 710 will be that sort of rifle. The metal's finish looks like spray on resin which about eliminates rusting on the exterior-- same as found on most newer rifles.
The one thing 700 lovers won't like about the 710, you can't just change barrels like you change your undies. The setup to machine the breech will be a trifle difficult for someone used to just threading a barrel and screwing it in.

Now I'll tell you about another sleeper that is bargin priced. That's the newer Mossberg rifles. True they are limited to a few cartridges, but out of the box they will shoot with any Ruger, Savage or Remington. Arkansas boar hunters are buying them for re-barreling to 338-06 A Square or Ackley Imp. Have barreled a couple to 9.3x62 and one to 35 Whelen. Renecks down here like a big bullet for big hogs in heavy brush but they don't like the price of express rifles nor the recoil of elephant guns. Mossbergs are 250.00 plus tax at Wal-mart in .270 or 06. A new barrel blank and three hours labor makes it a real hog gun.

Just my opinion...

By the way this post is about inexpensive rifles, we can also talk custom, push feed, dangerous game rifles, if need be.. Try shucking a round into a 700 while running and dodging the claws of a lion.. then you'll know why 700s don't go to Africa.
"If it wasn't for Mauser we'd still be shooting Springfield trap doors and lever guns"

bolt rifleman
 
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