Remington 725 .280

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by lcmcrev, Jun 11, 2008.

  1. lcmcrev

    lcmcrev G&G Newbie

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    A retired gentleman who is moving away gifted me with his Remington 725 .280 rifle. It is in excellent condition and with a nice Bausch & Lomb BALvar 8 scope. I will be taking it to the range this week...and hopefully to the mountains for hunting this fall (here in NM the big game hunts on public land are lottery). I've done some online research and found out that this particular rifle was only made in 1958...at least that's what is indicated on the Remington website. Do any of you know how many of these rifles were manufactured...or how I can go about finding out such information? Any other info you can provide would be appreciated as well. Many thanks. -LCMCREV


     
  2. GlennF

    GlennF G&G Regular

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    I believe this rifle was a transition model between the earlier 721/722 models and the current model 700. Nothing wrong with it. It was a little better finished than the 721.
     
  3. Sportsterboy

    Sportsterboy G&G Enthusiast

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    Model 725 info

    The Remington 725 was a more deluxe model of the 721/722 line (think ADL vs BDL Model 700's). The 725 had better stock with checkering, drop magazine, etc. 721/722 line had poorer wood quality for their stocks, no checkering and solid bottom (no drop) magazine. The 725's were made in 1958 and 59 in long action calibers only and 1960 and 61 in short actions calibers additionally. I have read (I think in old Guns & Ammo article) that the total # of rifles produced was 16,000 and change for all calibers for all 4 years combined, with 30-06 being the most common (about 6,000) and .243 being the least common (less than 1,000). The shape of the stocks on 725 vs. 721/722 is quite different with the 721/722's being kind of short pull and the 725 being (for me) just perfect. I have a 725 in .243 that I found in a Mo. pawnshop and have hunted with for over 20 years. I also have a 721 in .270 that was my dad's, that I now have since he passed away. I can attest that both are "shooters", with the 725 being a much easier gun to mount quickly/easily. I wish Remington would re-issue the 725, as I believe it is a much more classic looking rifle than the 700. Hope this helps.....If I were you, I would buy it in a minute. I have toyed with the idea of finding a 725 in .270, but already have my 721 in that caliber.
     
  4. rontpe

    rontpe G&G Newbie

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    Rem Model 725

    also have a 725 in 243 win cal.,, bought this new in 1963. Remington records indicate 990 made in 243 cal. Rifle is mint with a Redfield BearCub 3x9 scope HCH from the original purchase. Rifle has original factory upgraded stock. This has an adjustable trigger set at 2#, best in my collection. A total of 248 rounds fired in its lifetime,very accurate 1" moa . I would be interested in hearing from other owners of 725's to share pictures and experinences. Can be reached at [email protected]:feedback:
     
  5. 15AcreWoods

    15AcreWoods G&G Newbie

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    I had a 721 in 30-06 which is an ADL compared to the "BDL" 725. It was one of the finest shooting rifles I have owned, sorry I traded it. I had a .280 Reming in a Ruger M77. It was also a fine shooting cartridge. So you have the best of both worlds.
     
  6. 15AcreWoods

    15AcreWoods G&G Newbie

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    The 721 is the long action, the 722 the short action and the 725 the BDL of both.

    Model 721 Description: First truly modern centerfire rifle with the strongest bolt ever developed. Offered in long action only. Introduction Year: 1948 Year Discontinued: 1962 Total Production: Approximately 118,000 Designer/Inventor: Merle "Mike" Walker & Homer W. Young Action Type: Bolt action Caliber/Gauge: .264 Win. – 1961 – 22" barrel
    .270 Win. – 1948 – 24" & 22" barrel
    .280 Rem. – 1961 – 22" barrel
    .30-06 Sprg. - 1948 – 24" & 22" barrel
    .300 H&H Mag – 1948 – 26" & 24" barrel Serial Number Blocks: 11,000 – 430,0000 Various Models: 721A 1948 – 1962
    721AC 1949 – 1955
    721B Special Grade 1949 – 1955
    721D Peerless Grade 1949 – 1959
    721F Premier Grade 1949 – 1959



    Model 722
    Description: First truly modern centerfire rifle with the strongest bolt ever developed. Offered in short action only.
    Introduction Year: 1948
    Year Discontinued: 1962
    Total Production: Approximately 118,000
    Designer/Inventor: Merle "Mike" Walker & Homer W. Young
    Action Type: Bolt action
    Caliber/Gauge: .222 Rem. - .1950 - 26" & 24" barrel
    .222 Rem. Mag. - 1958 24" barrel
    .243 Win. - 1959 - 22" barrel
    .244 Rem. - 1956 24" & 22" barrel
    .257 Roberts - 1948 - 24" & 22" barrel
    .300 Savage - 1948 - 24" & 22" barrel
    .308 Win. - 1956 - 24" & 22" barrel
    Serial Number Blocks: 11,000 – 430,0000
    Various Models: 722A - 1948-1962
    722AC - 1949-1955
    722B Special - 1949-1955
    722 D Peerless - 1949-1959
    722 F Premier - 1949-1959
    722 ADL - 1955-1959
    722 BDL - 1955-1959


    Model 725 Description: Similar to the Models 721/722 with a Monte Carlo stock, Hinged floorplate and oversized three position safety. Introduction Year: 1958 Year Discontinued: 1961 Total Production: Approximately 17,000 Designer/Inventor: Wayne Leek & Charlie Campbell Action Type: Bolt action Caliber/Gauge: .270 Win – 1958 – 22" barrel
    .280 Rem. – 1958 – 22" barrel
    .30-06 Sprg. – 1958 – 22" barrel
    .222 Rem. – 1959 – 24" barrel
    .243 Win. – 1960 – 22" barrel
    .244 Rem. – 1959 – 22" barrel
    .375 H&H Mag – 1960 – 26" barrel
    .458 Win. Mag – 1960 – 26" barrel Serial Number Blocks: 700,000 – 717,000 Various Models: 725ADL – 1958
    725 Kodiak – Custom Shop - 1961
    725D Peerless – Custom Shop – 1961
    725F Premier – Customer Shop -1961
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2009
  7. Sportsterboy

    Sportsterboy G&G Enthusiast

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    Model 725 experiences

    This is in reply to the other Model 725 (.243) owner. I was aware of the small #'s of 725's in .243. I had read somewhere that there were 987 manufactured, so I believe your figure of 990 out of entire run (4 years) of 725's in all calibers combined. I talked with a guy that was a Remington dealer in the 50's/60's and he never had even SEEN a 725 in .243 and had tried to obtain one at the time they were available to no avail. He had a 725 in 30-06 that he had used for years and still hunted with. At the time I got mine, I was well aware of the Model 700's but not aware of the 725. On a whim, I hit several pawn shops in SW Mo in the late 80's and found mine there. When I picked it up, it fit me like a custom made gun and handled like no other bolt action centerfire rifle I had previously handled. Mine is equipped with a fixed 4 X scope which has always been quite adequate for my use. The longest shot on deer I have taken/made was about 175 yards. I have used mine every season since getting it in 1988. Every year I tell myself I shouldn't be using it in the field as it is kind of a rare bird, but the gun FEELS so good to carry/shoulder/shoot, that I keep going back to it every season. I have had other Remingtons, Model 7400 in .308 (sold), and Model 721 in .270 (still have), but the 725 is by far my favorite. With my handloads, I had a 1 MOA gun, but terminal performance with Hornady spire points was less than stellar. I switched to Federal Premium 100 gr Nosler partitions about 10 seasons ago and their performance is as good as it gets, with more than adequate accuracy from factory ammo. I have occasionally seen 725's in .280 or 30-06 at the Tulsa gun show (Wannamacher), but had my hopes of finding one in .270, so held off. The 725's are definitely one of the unheralded classics. My 2 cents.....
     
  8. elkhunt2

    elkhunt2 G&G Newbie

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    rem. 725

    I have a 725 .243 in great condition that Im thinking about selling can anyone give me a value? Not blue book but a real world value.
     
  9. Sportsterboy

    Sportsterboy G&G Enthusiast

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    I picked up my 725 in .243 in 1988 for $315 w/scope from a pawn shop. I haven't seen any recent copies of books of gun values to quote. About ten years ago there was a guy at the Tulsa gun show (Wannamacher's) that had a booth with several 725's (.280 Rem and 30-06's) that had written a book on Remington 725's. We talked some and he said he would give me (sight unseen) $1500 for my 725 in .243, but he could always have been blowing smoke up my *ss. I would check it out well before selling, though. :feedback:
     
  10. Sportsterboy

    Sportsterboy G&G Enthusiast

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    A few months back I did see a 725 in .222 Remington bring either $1100 or $1200 at a Cabela's (gun library) which are usually pretty pricey sales. Just a FYI.
     
  11. elkhunt2

    elkhunt2 G&G Newbie

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    Thanks for the info I went to cabelas yesterday and they told me it wasnt worth near as much as i figured ( about 800 bucks ) and that it wouldnt sell once they put it on the shelf. So I bid them good day and its back in the safe. Think I"ll just hang on to it. I currently have 4 .243s and that one is so pretty it never goes hunting, just puts holes in targets. Its an ok shooter 1 1/2" with 85 gr. sierras. Oh dont ask why 4 of them just right place right time. lol :burnout:
     
  12. Montana Guy

    Montana Guy G&G Newbie

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    Is there a market for Remington 725's? I have four of them. any information would be nice,such as what auction houses to work with and so forth. I have a 30:06, 222, 243, 375. Any suggestions about selling them would be nice too? Thanks, Montana Guy
     
  13. Sportsterboy

    Sportsterboy G&G Enthusiast

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    I would think at a major gun show (Tulsa-Wannamacher for example) you would find a market (decent price) for selling. The .243 you have is the rarest of the calibers you mention. Less than a 1000 (987 is the # I have seen in several articles) made in that caliber out of total (16,600 in 4 year run) of all calibers combined for Model 725's. The 30-06 is most common (6,000) of the calibers made.:usa2:
     
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