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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a Remington Model 11. Looks just like the Browning A5 humpback. I want to take the plug out. How hard is this? The end of the magazine looks like its threaded but it also has two crimps holding it in. Am I better off going to a gunsmith? Thanks for any help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can get the cap and forearm off. I was wondering about getting into the magazine. I don't even know if the model 11 has a plug. I can only get two shells in the magazine.
 

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Ive been reading up on the entire line of the old hump back design. Give me a day or two to get some of my books unpacked and I'll get back with you. Might not take that long but it will be at least untill the boys nap time.

I still havent came across my information but I was reviewing your post. This gun was the Browning A-5 I beleive later on Remington made a few small changes. But for a limited time Remington actually produced the Browning models during the war. The A-5 was the first succesfull semi-auto shotgun dating back to 1901 I beleive might be 03. FN Belgium made them orginally then Remington stepped in then the gun went back to FN and then to Japan. The Savage version of this gun was actually used as a riot gun for the Army for a limited time. And Ive not shot one or even handed one. But I do know the Franchi 48 line is also based on this design. Not for sure how the long action works without the hump back design or even how that gun is actualy designed. I'll keep looking for my information and get back with you asap.
 

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It's possible that your gun may be a three shot Sportsman model.

After you remove the forearm does the mag tube have the normal stamped steel spring retainer, or is there a solid steel insert with a treaded hole in it? If a sportsman the bolt will also have "The Sportsman" stamped into it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't have the gun at the moment but remember seeing Sportsman stamped either on the bolt or the receiver. It does have the steel insert with a threaded hole. I'm glad I didn't try to take it apart. The crimps in the end of the magazine tube threw me, I'd never seen that before. Thanks for the the info. Guess I'll have to learn to shoot better.
 

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Glad I could help. Ya' just gotta' love a Model 11.
Great design, handle well and as reliable as a stone axe.

Does yours have any kind of military stampings on it? Mine was a mil issue used for gunnery training. It has US and the ordanance bomb stamped on the upper left side of the receiver near the front.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No military markings. In fact it doesn't even have model 11 on it. Great gun. I inherited it from from my grandfather. Mine doesn't always cycle well in the cold otherwise no problems. Mostly use it for late winter game farm pheasants. 16 gauge is perfect for that. Someday I got to get a new stock and forearm and give it a makeover. Too nice of gun to look beat up.
 

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How cool, grandads gun makes it even better. If it's not unreasonably rough and ugly you might leave the appearance alone. Your grandad put those scuffs and mars on it during use and they tell their tales of his days afield with it.
Two of my five shot 11's came from my great uncle, one is an 11A (field grade) the other is an unfired 11F Premier. Both are first series guns with the safety inside the trigger bow.
Try using a better, lighter grade of oil on your magazine tube. Keep the tube clean and use just the lightest film of oil possible. Most of the cycling problems with 11's come from dirty mag tubes and oils which stiffen in the cold.

;as a side note; If you ever reblue your 11, you will Need to have the receiver recoil cushon replaced. Hot salts blueing will destroy it, and without it you risk damage to the receiver.
 
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