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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was shooting Rem. UMC .38 spl 158 gr LRN's (prod code L38S5) t an indoor range with dim lighting at the firing line and did not notice that one cartridge had an irregular and excessively thick rim and lacked the rounded groove in the brass case about 0.205" behind the lip. It failed to fully chamber, though I closed my Colt Detective Special without excessive force. Problem: the base dragged on the rear frame of the gun to the extent that I nearly stripped the pawl. I could have resulted in mis-indexing of the cylinder causing severe lead shaving & possible damage to the gun & to me. I have reported it to Remington.

I have learned a lesson: I will either use a flashlight on the range or prescreen any factory ammo I intend to use. Watch out for these cartridges: they were purchased at Dick's Sporting Goods (large chain) in North Carolina in April.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I located the lot # of the box with the offending round: it is nearly invisible (no inkO on the box end: it is either P25M 31 or P25N 31, I can't decipher which. Thanks for the comments. Now watch that ammo, y'all!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
PAPA G you are correct about the tiny percentage of bad ammo but consider the seriousness if a malfunction occurs which causes an injury. I think the best way to improve your chances is to visually inspect factory stuff just as you would your own loads. I perform QC in my own job: I can't correct it once it's out of my plant but I can tighten up my procedures and learn from my mistakes. That's basically all I hope to hear from Remington.
 
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