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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Remington 700 PSS 300 Win Mag in a bedded McMillan stock on the way. I bought it from a friend who was using it to shoot long distance but switched his platform.

To go with it I bought a Burris XTreme Tactical XTR II F-Class 34mm 8-40x 50mm scope. But I need help with rings. I always, every time, get rings that are either too short or too tall.

I am looking at the Vortex Precision Matched 34mm rings. If you can do the math to tell me how tall the rings need to be, I’d appreciate some advice. These are too expensive to order the wrong height.

Thanks.
 

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With a 50mm objective, you can use Low rings. I use Medium rings on all of my scopes so each rifle has the same style of cheek weld. Most have 56mm Objective's, but a few have 50mm.

That's a lot of magnification on that scope. I've never needed over 25x to shoot a mile, and most times because of mirage I have to turn it down to 15-18x. If that scope is FFP, you may have issues seeing the reticle good at lower powers.
On all of my scopes 4.5x / 5x lower end, the reticle really doesn't come into usable size until 10-12x. On that scope it will probably be 15-18x. Good luck!
 

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I’ve been bit and perplexed by this. I have dumbed it down to ordering from a vendor who will accept a return, order 2 and pick which works. I don’t take tools to the mounts and very careful with packaging.
The most challenging was on my 700 BDL. I wanted to retain the iron sights for back up so needed clearance while still staying low as practical on a 32mm I think I can slip a dollar bill between the front end and the rear sight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
With a 50mm objective, you can use Low rings. I use Medium rings on all of my scopes so each rifle has the same style of cheek weld. Most have 56mm Objective's, but a few have 50mm.

That's a lot of magnification on that scope. I've never needed over 25x to shoot a mile, and most times because of mirage I have to turn it down to 15-18x. If that scope is FFP, you may have issues seeing the reticle good at lower powers.
On all of my scopes 4.5x / 5x lower end, the reticle really doesn't come into usable size until 10-12x. On that scope it will probably be 15-18x. Good luck!
Live and learn I suppose.

I hope the scope is usable for my purposes, I'm purchasing some expensive stuff based solely on reading about what I need.

Thanks for the replies
 

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One thing also to consider is I like the minimum height of the scope which clears the barrel/receiver. The greater the distance between bore centerline and scope line of sight centerline, the greater the ballistic disparity effects. This is of course considering where YOUR line of sight is when using a consistent same place cheek weld to minimize parallax effects (which are always there).

If you're dealing with shorter ranges it's not a big deal but as you get into longer range shooting both cheek weld position and the disparity between bore and scope axis can accentuate problems.
 

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Dutch: Sir; another resource 🥸


Scope Ring Height and Clearance Calculator
Use this simple calculator to figure out if the scope and ring combination you're using will clear the barrel of your rifle when fitted. This calculator takes into account usage of Butler Creek scope covers as well as the scope mount for traditional bolt rifles.
 

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Hi Dutch, to do the math we also need to know what mounts you are putting on that rifle sir. The thickness of the mount plus the height of the rings will need to be ever so slightly larger than what 1/2 of the scope's "objective diameter is. According to the info on the Midway USA website, the "objective diameter" of that scope is 2.28" , and half of that is 1.14" so you'll need mounts and rings that the combined height will equal slightly more than 1.14". Hopefully I explained that correctly and clearly...
 

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Also here's a place you might check out for rings and mounts Dutch. They make some excellent products at a very affordable price point compared to many of the boutique brands. They offer picatinny mounts in both professional models and consumer models with varying amounts of MOA engineered into them to accommodate long range shooters and they also have recently released their new Keystone Series rings. They also manufacture lots of stuff for AR shooters and the 1911 crowd as well. I have one of their 20 MOA mounts on my 270 Win. Weatherby Vanguard.

 

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Also here's a place you might check out for rings and mounts Dutch. They make some excellent products at a very affordable price point compared to many of the boutique brands. They offer picatinny mounts in both professional models and consumer models with varying amounts of MOA engineered into them to accommodate long range shooters and they also have recently released their new Keystone Series rings. They also manufacture lots of stuff for AR shooters and the 1911 crowd as well. I have one of their 20 MOA mounts on my 270 Win. Weatherby Vanguard.

I agree that they make good stuff for various firearms.
My Remington 700 .308win came with a EGW 20 MOA base.
And I'm thinking of going to their bases and rings for my Milspec II .300WM. Or not, as sometimes you get perfect stock/shooter interface.

My advice is to go as low as possible with the rings and mounts. But you may have to go with some sort of either adjustable or permanent as in bolt on cheek piece.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi Dutch, to do the math we also need to know what mounts you are putting on that rifle sir. The thickness of the mount plus the height of the rings will need to be ever so slightly larger than what 1/2 of the scope's "objective diameter is. According to the info on the Midway USA website, the "objective diameter" of that scope is 2.28" , and half of that is 1.14" so you'll need mounts and rings that the combined height will equal slightly more than 1.14". Hopefully I explained that correctly and clearly...
Yep, after reading this I came up with 1.14 as well. Thanks for explaining it. Makes total sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Dutch: Sir; another resource 🥸


Scope Ring Height and Clearance Calculator
Use this simple calculator to figure out if the scope and ring combination you're using will clear the barrel of your rifle when fitted. This calculator takes into account usage of Butler Creek scope covers as well as the scope mount for traditional bolt rifles.
That’s a handy calculator. If nothing else you can plug-in the numbers just to verify you’ve got clearance before ordering the rings. Thanks.
 

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There are so many different variables that come into play when choosing scope rings.
1. What degree of bolt lift does your action have. Some of the scopes made today have very large ocular lense housings and magnification rings.
2. The body length of the scope compared to the length of the action. Some scope bodies are too short to mount on a long action receiver unless you use a picatinny rail base.
3. Some people want to mount the scope too low, where it barely clears the barrel. Then find out that they can't get a comfortable cheek weld in order to use it.

I set all of my rifles up so that when I shoulder the rifle, I'm looking directly through the scope without having to move my head placement. I may need to adjust the cheek riser, or install a pad on the stock in some cases, but I never have to push my cheek down into the stock to see through the scope.
Most of my scopes are between 3/8" - 1/2" above the barrel, and I use Medium height rings on all of my scopes no matter the objective size.








As far as guy's telling you to mount a scope as low as possible, that's really BS. If you measure the distance between the scope centerline and the bore centerline and install it into a ballistic calculator, it will give you the correct adjustments when dialing you scope. I shoot out to a mile with several of my rifles, and the ballistic data is spot on when the inputs are correct.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
There are so many different variables that come into play when choosing scope rings.
1. What degree of bolt lift does your action have. Some of the scopes made today have very large ocular lense housings and magnification rings.
2. The body length of the scope compared to the length of the action. Some scope bodies are too short to mount on a long action receiver unless you use a picatinny rail base.
3. Some people want to mount the scope too low, where it barely clears the barrel. Then find out that they can't get a comfortable cheek weld in order to use it.

I set all of my rifles up so that when I shoulder the rifle, I'm looking directly through the scope without having to move my head placement. I may need to adjust the cheek riser, or install a pad on the stock in some cases, but I never have to push my cheek down into the stock to see through the scope.
Most of my scopes are between 3/8" - 1/2" above the barrel, and I use Medium height rings on all of my scopes no matter the objective size.








As far as guy's telling you to mount a scope as low as possible, that's really BS. If you measure the distance between the scope centerline and the bore centerline and install it into a ballistic calculator, it will give you the correct adjustments when dialing you scope. I shoot out to a mile with several of my rifles, and the ballistic data is spot on when the inputs are correct.
Do you have a preference for ring brand on your long distance rifles? the friend who sold me the rifle pointed me to the rings linked in the OP, but I haven’t ordered yet.
Looking at the pictures he sent me I think the rail might be Weaver. If so, it’s cheap enough to put a new 20MOA rail on it and get whatever picatinny rings I choose.
Rifle and scope should both arrive on Wed and I will know more.

thanks for the post, it was informative.
 

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Ahhhhh! The dilemma that has haunted me since I first mounted a scope. Very informative as usual, gentlemen! Thank you.

Maybe when you grow tired of this post, you can inform me on how to properly level a scope. And don't give me the 'get two levels and put one on the action' story. I've yet to find a level spot on any action.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ahhhhh! The dilemma that has haunted me since I first mounted a scope. Very informative as usual, gentlemen! Thank you.

Maybe when you grow tired of this post, you can inform me on how to properly level a scope. And don't give me the 'get to levels and put one on the action' story. I've yet to find a level spot on any action.
Are you referring to getting the reticle perfectly vertical to the action? I, too, would like to know how to do that correctly. I've only been able to get it satisfactory by looking through it and adjusting until it's subjectively correct.
 

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Do you have a preference for ring brand on your long distance rifles? the friend who sold me the rifle pointed me to the rings linked in the OP, but I haven’t ordered yet.
Looking at the pictures he sent me I think the rail might be Weaver. If so, it’s cheap enough to put a new 20MOA rail on it and get whatever picatinny rings I choose.
Rifle and scope should both arrive on Wed and I will know more.

thanks for the post, it was informative.
There are many good rings and mounts available, but I only use American Rifle Co. M10 rings on my 34mm or larger tubed scopes. I also use them on some 30mm scopes, but mainly use Burris Signature Zee rings on them.


Ahhhhh! The dilemma that has haunted me since I first mounted a scope. Very informative as usual, gentlemen! Thank you.

Maybe when you grow tired of this post, you can inform me on how to properly level a scope. And don't give me the 'get two levels and put one on the action' story. I've yet to find a level spot on any action.
It can be hard to easily level scopes on guns that don't use a picatinny rail base. I run a picatinny or Weaver style base on almost all of my rifles, so it's easy for me to level all of my scopes.
1. You need a way to hold or stabilize the gun. I use a gun vise.
2. I mount level's like this on all my guns. Then you can level the rifle in a vise, or know you're holding the rifle level while shooting. You can buy them cheaper on Ebay & Amazon.
You can see the little level right behind the rear scope ring-

3. Once you have mounted the rings, then you can level the rifle, and clamp it in the vise where it doesn't move.
Even if you don't have or use a picatinny rail, you can also use a level on the lower half of your rings after you mount them.
4. Put your scope in the rings and adjust the scope for your eye relief. Then loosely attach the top rings.
5. There are a couple ways to level the reticle.
(1.) If your bench is perfectly level, mark a plum line on a wall behind the rifle, and shine a flashlight through the front of the scope. You will see the reticle lines on the wall, and adjust the scope to line up the reticle with the plum line on the wall.
(2.) You can put a target with a grid pattern up, but you need to make sure it's level. Then hold the rifle in the vise or on bags, and make sure it's level. Then look through the scope and adjust it until the reticle is lined up with the grid on the target.
6. Now the hard part! Depending on your rings, the scope can / will rotate as you tighten the screws on the scope rings. You must tighten them evenly, and check to see that the scope doesn't move at all while tightening / torqueing the screws. This is another reason I will not use 6 screw rings, it takes forever to keep the scope level when trying to tighten the screws.

If you take your time, your scope should now be completely level with you gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
There are so many different variables that come into play when choosing scope rings.
1. What degree of bolt lift does your action have. Some of the scopes made today have very large ocular lense housings and magnification rings.
2. The body length of the scope compared to the length of the action. Some scope bodies are too short to mount on a long action receiver unless you use a picatinny rail base.
3. Some people want to mount the scope too low, where it barely clears the barrel. Then find out that they can't get a comfortable cheek weld in order to use it.

I set all of my rifles up so that when I shoulder the rifle, I'm looking directly through the scope without having to move my head placement. I may need to adjust the cheek riser, or install a pad on the stock in some cases, but I never have to push my cheek down into the stock to see through the scope.
Most of my scopes are between 3/8" - 1/2" above the barrel, and I use Medium height rings on all of my scopes no matter the objective size.
I have the rifle in hand. If my measurements are correct a set of medium American Rifle Company A10 rings has .33" clearance up front. Surprisingly, low rings will clear with roughly 1/8th inch according to my calculations. You are spot on with the possibility of low rings being too low of course.

I will get a set of mediums ordered.

Objective Diameter of 57.91 mm
Scope Ring Height of 28 mm
Barrel Taper to Scope Mount is approx 9.43 mm


The rail is a single piece 20moa Weaver. The weaver base is proving to be a bit of a problem, almost every ring set someone points me to is picatinny. It may have to be replaced.

Edit to add - I love that ARC company gives you a handy measurement chart for ring height.

Second Edit - I had it backwards. Picatinny rings will fit the weaver base. I just need to get the scope in hand to verify the bolt knob will clear with a set of medium rings.
 
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