Road Flares for Fire Starting?

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by EHCRain10, Feb 23, 2008.

  1. EHCRain10

    EHCRain10 G&G Newbie

    What do you guys think of using the roadside emergency flares to start a fire in a survival situation?
    the ones that ive found burn for 15-20mins each so they should be able to get even wet tinder to burn.
    any ideas?
     
  2. toolman

    toolman Resident Sasquatch Forum Contributor

    Seems like a mite overkill to me, but in a survival situation they should work fine.
     

  3. Why not just get a magnesium fire starter? They're cheap, light, small and start lots of fires. Magnesium burns REAL hot and can start wet stuff also. Do a Google on "magnesium fire starter" if you haven't seen them before.
     
  4. If you want something small to start a fire for camping or survival, might I suggest one of these. I have one and that word GREAT! You can get them in black,yellow,red and a couple other colors I think. And that;s about the best price you'll find. One seller had a video of him using it to start steel wool on fire to demonstrate how hot the sparks get. Trust me, it does as I tried it.
    GunBroker.com guns: Ultimate Survival BlastMatchâ„¢ fire starter (item: 93030359 ends: Feb-24-08 05:29:59 PM)
     
  5. EHCRain10

    EHCRain10 G&G Newbie

    all the advice i see about packing a survival kit says to have at least 2 ways to start a fire and i was thinking that these could be a third way in a dire situation or a way to signal at night
     
  6. Well yes, at least 2 ways. Matches can get wet. Something could get lost or broken. Generally, I try to have one that isn't mechanical in nature. As they can break. So one of the 2, will be non mechanical or strictly manual. But those I mentioned are small and compact. Someone will always find fault in something if they look hard enough. lol Persoanlly, I think a flare is a good idea. Gopher it.

    I mean if a doctor orders enough tests on someone that's healthy, eventually they'll find something wrong. lmao
     
  7. samuel

    samuel G&G Newbie

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    Highway fuzees draw moisture and deteriorate very easily. sam.
     
  8. Wingwiper

    Wingwiper Guest

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    I am not sure what you all mean by the SHTF, but if it is because we are over run by the enemy for whatever reasons, whether it is for our oil fields or whatever, then you would not want to give away your position to everyone.

    For fire
    carry flint
    magnesium fire starter
    Carbide smoker,
    l.e.d. flashlight, far less power consumption than an ordinary bulb
    sections of rawhide to to be able to use the stick fire starter routine.
    matches
     
  9. I think it's a good idea to use flares or anything else that will light a fire in a SHTF situation.
    I don't like being cold so anything that would get a fire going fast would be super dupper to me.
    A.H
     
  10. I have a case of something called tryoxane. It's used to heat MREs. It looks like compressed laundry detergent. It burns very well.
     
  11. killer

    killer G&G Newbie

    I think you can figure out where I work due to my avatar and we use flares (fusee's) alot. Some of the "goofballs" I work with use them to light cigarettes. They have a tendency not to have long careers I've noticed....accident prone and all.

    Rain and wet sloppy snow will put the darn things out at times so they are not as great as one might think. But if you had wet tinder and needed something to assist and keep a good flame going for awhile I'd say they'd be good.

    One problem "new hires" find out is they stick them in their personel bags (grips) they use while out on the road and they are somewhat fragile. In a few weeks they find the magnesium powder has leaked all over their stuff.

    Like samuel said they have to be stored in a dry place, and keep them from rubbing on stuff while transporting and yaaaaaaa...I think a couple in the ole SHTF gear trunk not a bad idea.

    I had a terrible thought one night as I sneaked a ride in the caboose of a foreign railroad as they creeped through our yard heading home. The floor of the caboose was soaked with fuel oil from over the years. As I dismounted from the caboose I thought, "Wonder if I tossed a fusee in there by the time they were crossing the Mississippi river off our property if the hind end would be lit up like a torch? That would be kind of cool."

    Hey now...just a thought and I don't act on all my thought's. You know how things just pop in there uninvited..."Billy" I could use some help here.
     
  12. samuel

    samuel G&G Newbie

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    Wingwiper:sh** hit the fan.
     
  13. Wingwiper

    Wingwiper Guest

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    Sam

    I know what the letters meant, just not sure under what scenerio they are referring.
     
  14. BPierce

    BPierce Guest

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    Charcoal lighter fluid, read the cautions on the can and don't spill it on yourself.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2008
  15. mrloring

    mrloring Guest

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    I am a fire fighter so I get to use these fairly often. They will absorb moisture very quickly and then they are worthless. It actually takes very little moisture to ruin the striker on a flare. I tried to use one to light a campfire once, it doesn't work that well. Flares are designed to be held with the burning end up, like a candle, if they are held upside down they may go out. If you do use one light the flare, lay it down, and then put kindling on the flare.
     
  16. sell33

    sell33 G&G Enthusiast

    Only thing i have ever used a road flare for was to try to light a charcoal grill at a tailgate party because we forgot matches lol, it worked but was slow. Not surprising tho cause charcoal is always a slow burner...
     
  17. BPierce

    BPierce Guest

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    mrloring, I have been told that firefighters particularly forest fire people use fuel oil to start a fire. It burns hot but sometimes can be a little hard to ignite. I like to mix in a little gasoline but that means you have to be real careful. Having worked in a hospital, I can attest to the folly of using accelerants to start a fire when in a less than sober condition. A little squeeze bottle of an accelerant that you are familiar with is not a bad thing to have in an emergency.
     
  18. damage855

    damage855 G&G Newbie

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    clorine pool tablets, then drop a little brake fluid on them..:firedevil:
     
  19. mrloring

    mrloring Guest

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    That is true. In my area we have never had to fight fire with fire. When we do a training though, burn down an old house or in the countys metal burn building, we will use kerosene or diesel fuel. It is much safer than gasoline because it is not as volatile. We light up with a road flare either way.
     
  20. Amarksman

    Amarksman Guest

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    Thats a new one to me. Care to ellaborate a little?