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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In 1939, the British soldier was still armed with the same rifle his father, or perhaps even his grandfather, carried. The Short, Magazine Lee Enfield (SMLE) delivered sterling service from the mud of Flanders to the farthest reaches of the Empire. With Hitler’s war machine on the move, the British needed an accurate, mass-production rifle. Thanks to inter-war development, an improved and simplified design was waiting in the wings, and the No. 4 Mark I rifle was adopted on November 15, 1939.
The No. 4 Mk I, chambered in the same .303 British cartridge as the SMLE, retained the better features of the SMLE (in 1926 the SMLE was renamed the No. 1 rifle), but changes were made to the receiver, bolt, stock, sights, barrel, nose cap and bayonet. While being similar in appearance and features, very few parts were completely interchangeable between the No. 4 and No. 1. The No. 4’s receiver was strengthened and squared off; requiring less milling and simplifying manufacture. A simple one-piece charger bridge to accept five-round stripper clips was fitted into grooves on the top of the receiver, as opposed to the No. 1’s rounded bridge. The SMLE’s complex-to-manufacture nosecap was discarded in favor of a milled, and later stamped, front reinforcing band and a simplified sight guard. The No. 4 also had a heavier free-floating barrel, which protruded from the fore-end and eliminated the need for precision full-length bedding.
No. 4s had four types of aperture backsights. The Mk I micrometer backsight was made of milled steel with a battle sight set for 300 yds., which when flipped up was adjustable for elevation out to 1,300 yds. The Mk II had a simple, stamped, two-setting aperture sight. The Mks III and IV were also made from stampings, but, like the Mk I, had provisions for sighting from 300 to 1,300 yds.
New government ordnance factories set up to produce the No. 4 were Royal Ordnance Factory (ROF) Fazakerley in Lancashire and ROF Maltby in Yorkshire. Birmingham Small Arms (B.S.A.) Gun, a private company, also established B.S.A. Shirley in Birmingham to turn out the No. 4. All three began producing No. 4s in 1941. Despite its role in developing the design, the Royal Small Arms Factory Enfield did not produce any of the 2 million-plus No. 4 Mk Is made in England during the war.
In early 1941, while America was still officially neutral, the British Government contracted with Savage Arms Corp. to build 200,000 No. 4 rifles at the former J. Stevens Arms Co. factory in Chicopee Falls, Mass. After the entry of the U.S. into the war, Savage continued to make the No. 4 under the auspices of “lend-leaseâ€￾ agreements. The lend-lease Savage-made rifles were marked “U.S. Property.â€￾ Long Branch Arsenal, located near Toronto in Ontario, Canada, produced about 330,000 No. 4 Mk I and I* rifles. In sum total not only did North American orders bolster British production, but actually exceeded it during the war. The No.4 Mk I* was not actually adopted until 1946, despite being produced at the North American factories as early as 1941. The principal variation was in the method of bolt release. The bolt ribway had a new slot cut for the bolt head to be pivoted upward, out of the ribway. The machining at the rear of the ribway, the bolt-head catch, spring and plate were then no longer necessary.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I've been seeing Savage made Enfields in the Shotgun News for $175 before shipping, handling etc

it looks like it would be an outstanding, inexpensive bolt action so I bought one :right:
 

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Premium Member
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what!!! no glowing reports...no range report...no greasy fingers on the key board :right:
 

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Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler
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Give him time, PapaG! Takes awhile to get all the cosmo off. :right:
 

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Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler
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Joe, be sure to get one with the Mk.1 sight - that's the most accurate and bestest one! :right:
 

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Joe, I hate to say it, but you and I are thinking alike on this one. I got my k31 last week. Will be looking for the Enfield in the next month or so. I still haven't got the cosmo out of the K31 yet either.

I ordered some of the mil surplus ammo for the k31 - I think I am almost as impressed by the ammo as the gun.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A Century of Quality Firearms Development

The Savage Arms Company was organized in 1894 by Arthur Savage in Utica, New York. A native of Jamaica, Arthur led a romantic life, having been schooled in England and the United States. In his thirties, he explored the interior of Australia and was held captive for a year by Aborigines.Later he became the owner of the largest cattle ranch in Australia.

After moving to Utica, New York, he developed the Savage Halpine torpedo, became the Superintendent of the Utica Belt Line Railroad, and invented the first "hammerless" lever action rifle with the entire mechanism enclosed in a steel receiver. This remarkable rifle featured a rotary magazine with unique counter that visually displayed the number of bullets remaining in the receiver.The Model 99, as it became known, advanced firearm technology, offered the average person an affordable rifle, and started a business that has stood the test of time. In 1919,Chief Lame Bear (opposite) approached Arthur to purchase lever-action rifles for the Indian reservation and the two men struck a deal. The tribe would get discounted rifles and Savage would get their support and endorsement. It was at that time that Arthur Savage added the Indian head logo to the company name, a direct gift from the chief. By 1915, Savage Arms was manufacturing high power rifles, 22 caliber rifles, pistols and ammunition.

During World War I, Savage merged with Driggs-Seabury Ordnance Company, and made Lewis machine guns. In 1920, Savage purchased J. Stevens Arms which was associated with the famous barrel maker, Harry Pope. Later, Savage acquired the assets of Page Lewis Company, Davis-Warner Arms, Crescent Firearms, and A.H. Fox, thereby becoming the largest firearm company in the free world.

During the Second World War, Savage contributed literally millions of firearms to the campaign, converting it's factories to accommodate heavy munitions. After the war, Savage had excess capacity and adopted some of it's manufacturing processes to alternate consumer products, including the worlds first motorized lawnmower.

Between the early 1960's and late 1980's, numerous public and private
corporations owned and sold Savage Arms, culminating in a reorganization of the business, having filed for bankruptcy protection in early 1988. Ronald Coburn was named president/CEO and redefined the future of the business. The company downsized and produced only the model 110 bolt-action rifle until mid 1989.

By early 1990, the company was once again on a secure footing, having developed a strategy to build superior products at a reasonable price, something the competition could not match. Savage continued to redefined value during the 1990's, developing new products, improving materials and adding features that where only available in much higher-priced rifles.

Savage became a "consumer sensitive" company, adopting many of the ideas and suggestions offered by firearm users. Management spent time in the field, listening to hunters, talking with guides and comparing notes with industry writers, many of which have since became good friends and confidants over the years.

There is no substitute for hands-on experience, so management took all new products into the field themselves, to learn and appreciate the features and benefits of a new offering, and fine-tune as needed.

In 1992, Savage designed and patented the SNAIL, a environmentally friendly shooting range system that has since be adopted by all major firearms manufacturers, police, military and private shooting clubs in America and 14 other countries. The NRA, FBI and numerous special forces currently use the SNAIL Savage system.

By 1995, Savage was now financially strong enough to attract potential buyers and the owners showed interest in selling. In order to keep the company focused and under the control of local management, Ronald Coburn raised the money to purchase the company and took it private.

Since then, Savage has opened a factory in Canada to produce all .22 rim-fire rifles and reintroduced the famous lever-action "Favorite" rifle. A wood factory in Connecticut now produces stocks and a bolt-action shotgun and a hunting handgun called the "Striker" was introduced in 1998. In late 2000, Savage developed the worlds first smokeless muzzleloader and introduced a number of short magnums to complement it's center-fire rifle series.

Savage Arms is proud of its reputation for product improvements and has become the standard for accuracy in the industry. Recently, the company introduced the new AccuTriggerâ„¢, a trigger design so revolutionary it will forever change the way shooters expect triggers to function. Its another example of Savage's fresh innovation in setting new standards. At Savage Arms, the entrepreneurial spirit that originally defined the company is still evident today and history is currently being written!
 

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Logansdad said:
anybody know where I can find a 5 round mag for hunting ?
most any gun parts places will have them. if legal in your state, put a block of wood under the follower spring to reduce the capacity. :D
 

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Tradehawker LLC / www.tradehawker.com / Jn 17:17
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#4 MK1 SMLE, one of the finest rifles made. Savage made one of the best. The earliest ones sold to the Brits on lend lease had 6 groove barrels. These fall somewhere in the pre-* #4 MK1 US Property marked and flaming bomb proofed rifles. The later ones were marked the same, except with the * after #4 MK1 and sported 2 groove barrels.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
mine is marked "US Property" I dropped it off at my gunsmith's yesterday for cleaning, check headspace etc :right:
 

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Logansdad said:
Thanks Papa :right: can you be a little more specific ?
ok, cut a piece of wood to the approximate inner shape, thin enough to just pass the feed lips, and about half the depth of the magazine. add a screw in the top of the block to facilitate removal (let it stick out a little)
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
PAPA G said:
ok, cut a piece of wood to the approximate inner shape, thin enough to just pass the feed lips, and about half the depth of the magazine. add a screw in the top of the block to facilitate removal (let it stick out a little)
too much trouble :)
 

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LD, maybe this will help. all the centre fire rifles in Canada have been limited to 5 rounds. What I have seen done on mags like the 30 rounder for my mini 14 is that a small hole was drilled though the mag and a rivet was put in. you would have to determine where the rivet would go to allow only 5 rounds to fit in the mag. this mod is easily undone with a drill which is nice. hope that helps.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I don't want to mess up an integral part of an historic firearm...maybe I can find an aftermarket magazine :D
 
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