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Scout Rifle Link

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Jesse, Apr 18, 2002.

  1. Jesse

    Jesse G&G Newbie Forum Contributor

    2,036
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    Scout Rifle

    I thought you guys might find this link interesting...


    Jesse
     
  2. wes

    wes G&G Newbie

    My "scout" rifle concept is my father's old hunting rifle,1917 Enfield,30.06. Basically,the barrel has been cut down about four in. and no top wood or foward wood. Don't have a scope,just those fine peep sights.
     

  3. Logansdad

    Logansdad Guest

    Peep sights are outstanding !!!. I wish I could find a see through Extended Eye Relief scope mount for my 10/22 so I could leave my Williams peep sight right where it is & still be able to use it & mount a Leupold 4 power....kind of like having your cake & eating it too
     
  4. garandfather

    garandfather G&G Newbie

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    Oregon
    Israeli mauser .308, cut to 20", Choate light weight stock, B-Square L.E.R. Mount, Tasco 2x scope. Less than $200., light and fast.
     
  5. Ayteeone

    Ayteeone G&G Newbie

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    My first real scout was a Rem mdl 7 converted with the Burris base and scope. It was a smooth action, but had no backup sights and wouldn't group better than 1.25 off a rest, with anything. It was light and very practical, a good carrying gun in the field as long as one only needed a couple of shots. I got rid of it because the point of impact would quickly wander as the barrel warmed, as in after the first or second shot. Today I would send it to a quality smith...

    After several years of use it was replaced with a Savage Scout, the detail of which are elsewhere on this board. It's a fine working tool as well, not quite as refined but better suited to constant use. The stock does not make me entirely happy, could be slimmer and stiffer. This rifle is still considered in work.

    Most recent project is a Mdl 94 Trapper, converted with the Wild West Guns scope base, and a handmade sling which utilizes the saddle ring. While limited in hunting range, I find it incredibly fast on target and with followup shots. This could be called my camping/hiking gun, and has done duty as the home protection weapon as well, with the scope detached. The the open nature of the Ashley ghost ring sights means that they work especially well at room ranges.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2002
  6. WOULD SOMEONE PLEASE

    ....explain the scout rifle concept to me. Maybe I'm thick (in the middle for sure), but I just don't understand it. thanks.:confused:
     
  7. Ayteeone

    Ayteeone G&G Newbie

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    To understand the scout rifle concept it is neccesary to lay a bit of background... When used for "serious" purposes such as hunting, defending oneself or in the offence to take the fight to the enemy, there are parameters that must be considered in order to be successful. Some of these include:
    1. Short time frame in which to act, with a stiff penalty for second place.
    2. Unpredictable engagement ranges, but normally limited to within visual.
    3. Unknown capabilities of the "target" both offensive and defensive. This applies to hunting as well; "use enough gun".
    4. Unpredictable timing; the weapon must be at hand when it is needed, and fast to employ.

    It can be boiled down to being able to deliver a decisive blow where it is needed as quickly as possible, in the case of a fight before the other guy does.
    The Scout Rifle concept sought to provide a tool that would accomplish exactly that. It's small size and low weight keep it handy and easy to carry for long periods of time. The sights, especially the optical, allow the eye to rapidly, almost naturally, align the gun with the target. The sling allows the rifle to be stabilized against the body within fractions of a second. And the caliber is chosen to require only one shot if properly placed, over the practical range of engagement.

    In effect, it is a gesalt, a blending and refinement of features to produce a tool that improves (over other designs) the chances of success.

    If you have not spent time with one, I reccomend doing so. The style is not for everyone, but is undeniably effective, and in skilled handles amazingly so.

    This is a quick explanation, there are many other commentaries and thoughts on the matter.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2002