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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for someone that can help me in finding out about a double barrel shotgun that was my grandfathers.

It has W Richards on the side, no serial no. that I can find and on the top it has "fine damascus". Also, this is double hammer, double triggers.

Thanks to anyone that can help.:feedback:
 

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Safety first

Do not fire this gun as it has damascus barrels. It is not safe to do this with modern pressure loads
and also not safe due to age. In the simplest way to put it, damascus is a sort of wrapping of flattened metal wire around a form then fusing the metal together with a process similar to soldering.
I am using an extremely simple explanation not to insult yours or anyone else's intelligence but to
explain the barrels can give way suddenly and violently under pressure from a modern shotgun load. My advice - learn what you can about the gun, refinish the wood if you like, and keep it as a conversation piece.
 

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+1 I would put it over my fireplace.:09:
 

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You have a W.Richards Belgium made Damascus Shotgun. Value is 100 to 400 dollars...Depending on configuration and condition... It will Shoot Black powder shells , but It would need to be checked out By a gunsmith first... Clean it up, keep it clean and oiled...
Rich
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
WRichards Shotgun

Thanks very much for the information. I have no plans of shooting the gun. It is hanging on the wall and will stay that way.

Thanks again

Casey01:)
 

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glad your not going to shoot it. the only way to know if a damascus barreled shotgun is safe to fire- even with BP loads- is to have the barrels X-ray'd. having a gunsmith look it over wont cut it.
 

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A little more on Damascus twist barrels: they're made of layers of alternating steel and iron, or hard and soft steel, folded and refolded and hammer-welded together in strips. Typically three of the built-up strips are wrapped around a mandrel, and hammer-welded into a barrel. The barrel is reamed to the proper gauge, and filed to the proper shape outside. Properly done, it makes a very good barrel. But the layered construction is an invitation for rust to get into the softer layers and start the barrel delaminating.

The main problem with them is that they were designed for black powder, which burns very quickly, almost in an explosion. So typically BP shotguns are very thick at the breech, because that's where they had to withstand the pressure. The pressure drops rapidly as the wad and shot move down the barrel, so they usually taper toward the bore. But modern smokeless is a controlled burn, and pressure actually keeps building behind the shot as it goes down the barrel. Those tapered barrels can't handle it.

My Dad's cousin way back in the late fifties was offered a $10,000.00 signing bonus to play with the Washington Senators as a left-handed pitcher; a lot of money in those days. But he went goose-hunting using modern loads in an antique shotgun...he blew the ends off the thumb and two fingers of his pitching hand, and ended his career before it ever started.
 
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