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skeet shooting with a handgun?

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by cremley, Apr 27, 2008.

  1. cremley

    cremley G&G Enthusiast

    I was wondering if anyone has ever shot clay pigeons with a handgun before. I think i saw some sort of a "shot" round before, but I could be mistaken. does anyone know if you can do it? I don't own a handgun but I was thinking of getting one for concealed carry and target shooting. I was also wondering if a springfield XD in .45 ACP was a good choice and if I can buy this "shot" load for it?

    Thanks,
    Chris


     
  2. andrew cochran

    andrew cochran G&G Newbie

    Yep, you can get "shot" loads for em. But thier for snakes and thus called snake loads. I dobt they would break a clay. But I might be surprized.
     
  3. thomasbrooks07

    thomasbrooks07 G&G Newbie

    taurus makes new revolver called the judge its a .45 and .410 guage shotgun it looks pretty **** cool I would like to get one. I have seen a old timer at my gun range that can shoot a skeet with a regular bullet from his hand gun its pretty **** impressive. He makes quite a lot of money doing it from people who dont know him who bet he cant do what he claims lol .
     
  4. TheWall

    TheWall Firearm Affectionado Forum Contributor

    I've never heard of it before. I know people that have done it just screwing around. You can get shot shells in just about any caliber, I think. It would be difficult to do I think because of the speed and distance the clay pigeons travel. Look forward to reading other comments.
     
  5. nathangdad

    nathangdad G&G Newbie

    Editing . . .

    . . . . causes many things to happen in the movies and on television.

    Someone can be shooting a blank while someone else offscreen has a
    shotgun or a rifle. With the right camera angles and sound editing you can "see" someone hitting all sorts of targets with a handgun.

    Actually, your changes of hitting a flying clay target with a handgun are just about zero. But, given that you launch a bullet toward a flying target does mean incredible accidental hits can occur.
     
  6. andrew cochran

    andrew cochran G&G Newbie

    Well said!
     
  7. lefty o

    lefty o G&G Enthusiast

    ive seen a few people do fairly well with a contender shooting 410's.
     
  8. cremley

    cremley G&G Enthusiast

    I was just wondering. that is a pretty helpful piece of information though, thanks. with that being said, is a 45 ACP Springfield XD compact a good choice for concealed and target shooting? I have fired a lot of rifles and a lot of 12 guage shotguns before but I have only shot a 9mm glock handgun once. would the .45 be a good choice?
     
  9. nathangdad

    nathangdad G&G Newbie

    Hi Cremly

    Well, you can ask too much of a handgun.

    A gun designed for concealed carry is just not designed for
    longer range target work. It is designed for those situations in which you
    produce the gun then point and shoot in the least amount of time. Concealed carry and instincting/reflexive shooting go hand and hand.
    You should concentrate on producing your concealed carry gun then firing at a torso target about ten yards distant. The mantra I was taught is "produce, point, and fire" and do it until you have proficiency on the torso target.

    Target hanguns will be larger, have longer barrels, and distinctive/adjustable sights allowing you to properly frame the target.
    They are not designed for convenience of carry and fast draw.

    You might want to look at the Ruger website for an interesting example.
    They have SP101 small frame revolver which has a short barrel (two and three quarter inch or three and one sixteenth inch) and no adjustable rear sight to hang up on holster or clothing. This is a true concealed carry gun but not what you want for a 12 inch pie plate at 20 yards.

    They also have the GP100 revolver which is a larger framed gun with an adjustable rear sight and can be had in a six inch barrel. This is the gun you want for aiming at a definite target such as a 12 inch pie plate at 20 yards but note it is neither really comfortable to carry all day every day nor is it quick to produce in a time of emergency.

    Hopefully, this example will convey the message. Consider what you really want a handgun to "do or be" and let that guide your search for the gun you should purchase.

    Personally, I like the .45 auto as it can be had in both carry gun design and
    target design of the Colt Gold Cup theme. I urge you to test fire as many handguns as possible to get a feel for what fits you best in terms of recoil, pointability, sight picture,
    grip to hand fit, trigger pull, and so on . . . .
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2008
  10. callcameron

    callcameron G&G Newbie

    Answer to both questions

    First, I have shot at a clay pigeon with a 45 loaded with snake shot. It doesn't break (although, upon close examination, I noticed some very small holes in it).

    Second, although I have never fired a Springfield XD compact 45, I have heard nothing but good things about them. I love shooting my 45. Great knock-down power with a lot less recoil than my 44 magnum.
     
  11. Bravo

    Bravo G&G Newbie

    I can see this being possible with a .410 handgun.

    I don't think it will work with CCI shotshell ammo though.
     
  12. jerry

    jerry G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

    I can just hit them with a shotgun
     
  13. runfiverun

    runfiverun G&G Evangelist

    i have shot trap with a hand gun it is not easy, got the idea from an old army team shooter.
    it was part of their routine.
    i do shoot trap with my 92's with light loads it is really fun can hit about half of them
    with some practice.
     
  14. TXplt

    TXplt Gun Toting Boeing Driver Forum Contributor

    I was out bustin' clays with the judge a few weeks ago.

    They were hand thrown and real close, though. The shot charge spreads out very rapidly.

    Was a blast, though.
     
  15. cremley

    cremley G&G Enthusiast

    Thanks for the advise guys, I will look into firing different guns and will probably go with a small concealed gun. Then I will get one for target shooting ;-)
     
  16. oldjarhead

    oldjarhead G&G Evangelist

    The Springfield of which you speak is a good choice and will serve you well in both carry and target. There is no need to buy two different pistols for what you want to do. I carry a PT58 .380acp 4" barrel and use it for target shooting all the time. It just takes practice and know-how. When you are ready go for a pistol for competition if you want.
    Don't confuse target pistols with competition pistols; there is a difference.
     
  17. stalebiscuit

    stalebiscuit G&G Newbie

    hahaha ohh, man that takes me back

    i mean, what a terrible idea
     
  18. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder G&G Newbie

    The biggest problem is getting shot shells to feed in an auto. I load them in 44 and 45 and use them a lot in SA Rugers for bird control.
     
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